Plasti Dip and Pluck Foam

I recently purchased a Plano Rustrictor 42" case which is a pluck foam based solution. I really like the case, solid construction and made very well. I put in the time to map the layout of where my rifle, and cutouts for my additional storage should be and overall was very happy with how things fit.

After a few rounds of taking items in and out I quickly realized the pluck foam was not going to hold up for the long term so I began looking for a better solution. I was happily surprised to find there was a low-cost solution to my dilemma and wanted to share my findings. Prior to finding this I thought I would have to get a custom cut single-piece foam solution or get a non-pluck version.

I’m sure many of you on this site are aware of this as it appears to have been around for a while, but it’s new to me and I thought it would be new to some of you as well.

There is a spray can product called Plasti-Dip, which is essentially a rubberized spray that is perfect for just this need. I bought 6 cans and ended up using 5 full cans covering 10 coats on the top side of the foam piece and 5 coats on the bottom. It’s important that this is done after you pluck the foam. I am super happy with the results. It’s also important to ensure you are doing light coats. I went a bit heavy on some coats and you can see some thicker rubber sections, but nothing that is too bad. I now have essentially a single piece of foam that feels like it will last a very long time. This will be done to all my pluck-foam inserts from now on. Be advised, when they say to use this in a well-ventilated area they aren’t kidding. Wow this stuff puts out the fumes. :smiley:

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Very nice!!! I hope Santa is watching LOL!

Stay safe out there.

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Indeed! Thanks, stay safe as well.

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@ScottH,
I have a soft case for my AR15 but if I ever purchased a case like the one you have I would try the same thing. BTW you did a great job brother.

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Nice job, definitely will make me look at this method

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Thanks @Johnnyq60 I’m very pl6with how it turned out.

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Thanks @Steven194. I watched a lot of YouTube videos on it and wasn’t quite sure. I figured it was worth a shot thou. Glad I tried it

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I wonder if it would work if you sprayed the whole thing down (top & bottom) and then went at it with a hot knife like the regular foam. That way you have a custom cut rather than just the blocky outlines?

Cheers,

Craig6

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That’s a great idea. It might work well. Probably would need to spray the cut areas again to recoat it.

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I have a pistol case and a few cans of flex seal. I will be trying out the removed blocks from the case which I set aside and trying the flex seal to see how it works. Feel like if I take some time with it it might work, might be a bit ‘heavy’, Ill update when I get it finished

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Very nice! I look forward to seeing the results. :+1:

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Nice. I may look into doing this myself. Thank you for sharing.

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Cool. If you do post some before and after shots. :+1:

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Cool idea; I’m going to suggest this to my daughter, who owns a spongy box that’s falling apart inside.

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Outstanding idea! Thanks for sharing.

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Thanks @ScottH new to me!

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Pluck foam never seemed like much of a solution for durability. I replace it with plain open– or closed–cell (depending on application) foam sheet cut to my container, then cut for my contents.

I use liquid or spray rubber cement to build up foam layers or shapes as needed — lamination also adds a bit of firmness to an open-cell foam. Sharp tools and careful strokes to cut the lines or shapes. If your container comes with pluck-foam, you might use it to create a pattern. If not, have cardboard or some extra foam to work out a cutting pattern.

This Pelican 1120 case holds a couple FRS radios and a couple sets of AA batteries. The pink foam block is built up in two layers, with a thin base liner and egg carton lid liner from Pelican. It’s been getting regular use for more than 20 years without significant deterioration. A firearm would be a different application, but the methodology would be another way to beat the shelf-life of pluck-foam.

I didn’t know you could get Plasti-Dip as an aerosol. :yum:

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That’s a sweet setup!:+1:

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I did the same plastidip spray two years ago on two of my cases from Pelican case company. They are both holding up well and make it look much better too. You have to ensure to layer the paint and do several layers.
It is a great, low cost solution.

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Welcome aboard @Christopher334

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