People new to carry that have questions

@robert15 there are model-specific under-seat safes for a lot of vehicles, here are a couple examples, but you always have to look for what fits what you’re driving.

https://www.amazon.com/Rocket-Offroad-RO-JP-LK1-Underseat-Wrangler/dp/B0741H8SF1/

and underseat lock boxes for the rear seat:

https://www.amazon.com/Tuffy-316-01-Width-Under-Lockbox/dp/B00XY2YQB0/

in-floor boxes:

@John150 this might work for you: console lock boxes or inserts:

https://www.amazon.com/Tuffy-Trucks-Security-Console-Insert/dp/B01EZA1ICO/

https://www.amazon.com/Locker-Console-Personal-Secure-Organized/dp/B00FQKKNOW/

Zee, I can’t find where I had originally posted this note. I have since found a “Gun safe in your car” section but my post isn’t there. Maybe you folks can combine some of these similar posts and questions. I like this site but it is getting big and there are many duplicate places. Not sure how to rectify all of that though. Good job keeping everything going.

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@Robert15 - I’ll try to find the “car safe” thread and move some of these over to it… if I can’t @Dawn probably can :smiley:

Do you by chance have room between the seat and console?

I’m giving away a secret here but I have one permanently mounted in all my vehicles that ride there, it’s just covered with a jacket, towel etc so nobody sees it.

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I need lingo help. There’s so many terms here I’ve read that I’m clueless about, but can’t quite remember them all. I’ll have to ask as I come across them. Two that I just read are stove piping and double tap though. I’m thinking double tap is firing two shots quickly, lol?

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Best explanation would be to watch video:

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So double tap is two shots quickly and as closely as possible? Is this for training purposes, or what you should do in a real event, or both?

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YES.
From user’s (I’m not instructor) perspective - both purposes.
All of us are train to stop the threat, and stop it asap, so double tap is 100% applicable here.
Practice “double taps” whenever you can, this well trained skill can save someone’s life one day.

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I disagree slightly and my disagreement is based solely on semantics, but I’m a firm believer that words and their usage matter. I feel that “double taps” should really only be used for competition or contact close distances in defense (which would often end up being un-sighted fire). I believe that “controlled pairs” should be used in most defensive situations requiring 2 or more rounds. A controlled pair can be just as fast with training (I personally run in the .18 splits range when flowing well) and I think we need to be able to explain ourselves, after the fact, as having a solid idea of where every one of our rounds is going. Here’s an article talking about the difference between “double taps” and “controlled pairs”…

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Thx @JustinK - that’s a good instructor’s explanation.:ok_hand:
And good reading, it explains everything :+1:

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Thanks to you @Jerzy and @LolaKinks for the great question and conversation.

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@JustinK, U R welcome. The fact is that you change my thinking about “double taps”. I’ve always used this name for my 2-rounds fast shooting…and now I know it is “controlled pair” :+1:
Now I can impress my kids with this term :face_with_hand_over_mouth::wink:

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It’s an old, outdated training and tactical approach.

Pretty well universally today police, military, and self defense have all come around to “shoot until the threat is eliminated”.

The original “double tap” was “one to the heart, one to the head” as taught to SWAT, and Spec Op’s personnel to ensure that the target was stone dead by the time they hit the ground.

That is not our objective as self defenders and we need to be extremely clear about that.

We can shoot only as long as there is an active threat of grave bodily harm or death to ourselves or third parties we are defending.

That may take one, six, or 24 shots but if you’re ever involved in a defensive shooting you’re going to have to justify every shot you took particularly when it comes to any potential civil case that follows.

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Me personally, if the threat is within arms reach. I will not draw my firearm, I will use hand to hand or use a close quarters weapon if needed. If I draw my firearm, it better be my only option from the beginning. If I deescalate the situation I will. It’s best to exhaust all other options first before choosing to draw and fire.

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I think double taps are really nicely covered by the team here :grin: :+1:

Stovepipes are when the spent brass fails to completely exit the ejection port and is trapped by the slide as it moves forward. This can result in the empty brass sticking straight up and pinched in the ejection port, preventing the slide from returning to its fully forward position (that full forward position is called “in battery”). The resulting brass-sticking-up situation looks like a stovepipe, hence the name.

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There are multiple causes for stovepipes, but the common ones are

  • “limp wristing” - grip and position allows too much movement on the recoil and bleeds off the energy that should operate the slide movement and extraction of the spent shell
  • round is under powered - the firing round doesn’t generate enough energy to overcome the recoil spring and the slide doesn’t travel all the way back before returning forward
  • recoil spring is too stiff - the spring overpowers the force of the round throwing the slide backwards and the slide doesn’t travel all the way back before returning forwards
  • dry or dirty gun - the slide should be oiled where it meets the rails so it slides smoothly forward and back. If there is too little lubrication or a lot of gunk has built up, it creates additional drag on the slide so it doesn’t cycle properly
  • extractor issues - the extractor is supposed to pull the used brass out of the chamber and pop it out of the ejection port, but if it’s not working correctly, that may fail

That list is more-or-less in order by likelyhood.

Stovepipes are a malfunction of the FTE (failure to eject) type but are sometimes included as a FTF (failure to feed). In any case, your gun won’t fire in this condition and the offending brass has to be cleared and a round chambered, then the slide must return to battery, before you can make your next shot.

Clearing malfunctions is part of what your instructor should be teaching you, as it can be critical in a self defense situation.

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Thank you for the thorough explanation!

My husband and I are going to the only somewhat-close-to-me shooting range today and I’m going to sign up for a class while I’m there, and also inquire if they have any instructors that do one-on-one and if so, if I can get myself in with that person asap.

I’m also going to get together with my friend who has a lot of guns, sells guns, and even helped me with the purchase of my own (Walther CCP 9mm) about how to clean/oil/whatever my gun. He’s been a great help so far, but just hasn’t been able to help me as much as I need/want him to due to medical reasons.

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If you can get your friend to help you break your firearm down completely and practice putting it back together several times will help out a lot.

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At the range today, the owner of the shop gave me a very quick rundown on breaking down a firearm and it seems MUCH easier than I anticipated. I will still see about my friend coming over, but maybe there’s a video about it with my specific firearm. I also bought oil and a thingy (I don’t remember what it’s called - a pipe snake thing) to do the cleaning with that the owner suggested I get.

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Yeah, they’re generally not too bad. What model firearm?

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Walther CCP 9mm - the one that uses a key, not the more recent M2 model.

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