Just Curiousity

Who has had experiences with the .454 Casull, or Henry’s version of the AR-7, the breakdown .22 survival rifle of the '50s? The AR-7 has movie history, being featured in two successive Bond movies, and Rage, with Goerge C. Scott. FYI

I know the AR-7 (didn’t know Henry was making one) well (I’m a sucker for all things E. Stoner) and have had some experience with the 454 Cas both reloading and shooting. What info are you looking for specifically?

Cheers,

Criag6

My AR-7 is from Charter Arms. Not familiar with the Henry rendition beyond what Google has to offer — appears there are some enhancements, if they haven’t given ground in other areas.

I’m thinking Henry bought the right to the AR 7 from Charter Arms quite some time ago (20 years or more). I have the Henry and like it. Light and compact when stored (all parts fit in the stock). Probably have 1000 or so rounds through mine with no problems.

Henry’s made the AR-7 for several years - just wanted to know if anyone has used the .454 for hunting or has used it for a backup for hunting/camping and hiking.

I’ve used the .454 Casual pistol in bear country. I don’t have a .454 rifle. I do have a really nice safe queen
45-70. It’s a special edition with lots of silver and gold engraving.

Thinking about picking up an AR7 myself. Henry has a good track record

I’m looking at revolvers in .454. Actually what I’m looking into is 460 Magnum. It is a super magnum cartridge, and I could shoot 454, and 45 Colt in the same gun. I haven’t used an AR7, but, I have experience with a Marlin Papoose. Same concept. If you can find a Papoose, their great little “survival” rifles.

Papoose seems more like a takedown 10/22 without a forend than an AR-7.

  • AR-7 = 2.5lb* = 16.5" disassembled (stores inside stock)
  • 10/22 = 4.5lb = 19" disassembled (separate case req’d)
  • 70PSS = 3.5lb = 21" disassembled (separate case req’d)

I found the Charter AR-7 with simple aperture sight to shoot well for any survival-type hunting practical with .22LR. The Henry provision for optics seems to add a bit, but then you have a separate storage (+float, +waterproof) challenge to address. Improved front sight and storage for a 2nd magazine are a definite plus.

User observation — I found a two-handed pistol-type grip on the AR-7 stock with support elbow braced against the chest (or knee) to be more solid than the “hang onto receiver/magazine” hold shown on the Henry website.

*actual weight of Charter unloaded; Henry lists their AR-7 at 3.5lb.

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I have had a Henry AR7 for about 4 years. Lots of fun to shoot, accurate and fits nicely under my Jeep seat. I believe the earlier Charter Arms models had magazine problems which put a lot of people off. The Henry model has an improved magazine design and I have probably put several hundred rounds through mine with no problems.

Not sure when that might have been. I’m sure I put more than a few bricks through mine in the 1980s and never saw a malfunction of ammo, gun, or magazine. That would have been before the internet was around to complain, so I only had my own experience to work with. Then I came up with scratch for a 10/22, and the AR-7 has been in the survival bag since.

Charter also made a pistol based on the same receiver and takedown design — functioned fine but was clumsy to shoot or carry.

I don’t have personal experience with the older Charter Arms models, just what I heard on other forums.

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