How to blend in while carrying

#1

It was brought up in the January issue of uscca magazine about being “low-key” and i always toss back and forth the concept of low key. I am a tshirt and jeans guy with either cowboy boots or converse shoes kinda guy. I read from other forums about ghe idea of conceal carriers being targeted and i often think about my past experiences. Before i got my ccp i forced my self to open carry for 2 weeks or so before i began carrying concealed. I learned alot. 90% of the time people didnt notice the 1911 on my hip. So why would a wardrobe singlw you out as a target? Has there been any recorded situations that can prove this theory or are we just paranoid???

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#2

I don’t know of any situations where such a thing has been recorded. But for the reason of looking inconspicuous, I’ve not been wearing my tactical pants out in the public.
I would think that the more military/tactical you look the more likely someone is to think that you could be a threat or that you’re just looking cool. I read a story of a guy who wore his Army field jacket out in Philadelphia and got mobbed. As a result, he was hospitalized and his jaw was basically destroyed.
Just my two sense. Dunno if that helps you or not.
Also, what 1911 do you carry?

#3

Its a para ordinance i have. Dont carry it much. More of a range piece these days.
I open carry when i go to the woods so yeah sometimes im wearing camo and a pistol on me. Ive never been or came close to the feeling of beimg targeted. Just a few awkward stares occasionally.

#4

I’ve seen the Para USA 1911s. They’re not cheap. They’re actually some of the most expensive pistols on the market.
That’s understandable.
I mean to everyone their own. I personally just prefer to look as normal as possible. I mean even if I did look utilitarian, if anyone were to ask I have the plausible deniability of working in the trades.

#5

I picked up that 1911 in a trade for a heritage 22wmr revolver. Its about a 500$ pistol. Great shooter.

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#6

The Para pistols are around $500? Every place I see they’re about $1300. So either I’m looking in the wrong places or you got lucky.

#7

I think para usa and para ordinance are two different companies. The model is a para expert ive seen it in gun shoos for 500-600 they have some higher end pistols though.

#8

Actually I looked it up. It’s the same company just PARA-USA is the successor to Para-Ordnance. So that’s the only difference to my knowledge.

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#9

Well thats cool! I had heard that Remington had bought them?

#10

I picked up a para 1911 GI Expert for about 550 at bass pro a few years back that was the first gun I ever bought and I still love that thing it’s a nail driver out to about 15 yards

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#11

They are some accurate pistols. I had a guy try to trade me a kimber for it. I declined because he was clearing jams like every 3 rounds :laughing:

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#12

I’ll have to look for them at a local gun store next time I’m there.

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#13

Honestly I would take one over a kimber any day. I know the fit and finish on a kimber is great, but I’ve not heard good things about their customer service and for the cost I can turn a para into a better 1911 then that

#14

Ah, nice! How you liking the recover tactical grips? Are they super thick?

#15

They are a real trade off I dont really carry it any more but with the grips it won’t fit a standard holster they are a bit thicker then standard but feel good in the hand. I like being able to mount a light/ laser for home defense. The compensator was an anniversary gift from my wife a few years ago and while it doesn’t perform 100% as a comp the added weight really helps with muzzle rise for faster follow up shots. Eventually I want to get the trigger done and the feed ramp and ejection port polished just keeps getting back burnered since it mostly a range toy.

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#16

Yeah I always heard that those comps were more of an aesthetic thing. I wanna gut mine and put all Wilson combat internals and a threaded barrel for my new suppressor.
I like the idea of the recovery grips. Gotta get a tlr-1 on that bad boy!

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#17

Low key is a good point, @Skywalker87. And I think what you wear is only part of it. How you carry yourself can also make you a target or blend in.

Are you nervous? Do you fidget with your gun (a new carrier’s mistake, but carrying is an adjustment)? Are you “hyperaware”? There are those whose head is always noticably on a swivel and are tacti-cool - you know the ones I’m talking about - they purposefully draw attention to themselves and will brag / hint about carrying.

Calm confidence, aware of your surroundings, and dressed appropriately for the event/location will all play into if you’re targeted or you blend in.

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#18

I don’t fidget with my gun but sometimes I have to pull up the back of my pants when I’m carrying in my Wrangler jeans (I find they stretch over time; don’t like that). And I try to just give a glance or two around as I’m in line checking out or when I walk in. Not make it obvious. Actually in a store, that’s the easiest place to blend in because you’re always looking for something.
But places outside of a store I would think that you need to be more careful as it would be more obvious which can be difficult at times.

#19

My personal opinion, I dont think people are paying that close attention if any. I’m a head on a swivel kinda of guy I make eye contact with individuals approaching me I’m very self aware and always watching out for my squad (kids).
I believe people are too busy going on with their lives that they aren’t searching for someone with a gun.

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#20

Head on a swivel is a good thing, but with appropriate tact.

I’m always looking around, but casually. With kids it’s even easier to look casual as you’re probably checking out where your kids are - my three used to go in three different directions when we’d get to a store. So I had every reason to look around.