How often do you clean your firearm?

#1

We all hear about the mythical gun you never have to clean. However, in real life, we need to clean our guns regularly - especially if we want them to function correctly and we want to make sure we can demonstrate we’re responsibly armed by taking care of our equipment.

How often do you clean your firearms?

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#2

I clean after every trip to the range but do a really deep clean a few times a year. Just depends how much ive shot thru it and how abused it got. I shoot in all weather and some dusty environments. My EDC gets a little more attention as does AR before a trip to ensure everything is GTG

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#3

As soon as I get back home from the range and every 2 weeks (Just a simple wipe and inspection) if not used.

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#4

I clean my carry gun once a week. Basic field strip with a very light wipe down with a patch, not much more. After a range visit it gets a more thorough cleaning and the mags get a wipedown. Every few months the magazines get a more detailed cleaning.

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#5

I can hear my late father, the old Korean War Mst Sgt; “Would you bet your life on that weapon, son?”. I get anxiety if I don’t strip and clean everything I shoot, the day I shoot it.

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#6

When dirty and whenever I want too.

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#7

Exactly my process. Quick once over, every week. If I’ve been to the range, a little more in depth. Deep clean about every 6 months. More if I’ve shot more frequently.

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#8

I probably spend about 30 to 45 min per handgun after shooting. I have a dehumidifier in my safe, so I wipe down my unused guns every couple months.

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#9

Imediately after every trip to the range, and once a week for the one I carried that week. The safe queens get some attention around every 2-3 months, unless I get bored and, do it sooner.

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#10

Right now I’m experiment with my guns. I’m pushing and testing them. I want to know their limits. Before my experiment phase I deep cleaned it after the range. Im figuring out how much oil to maximize functionality. Im a bit OCD about it. Im dying not having cleaned them the last two range visits. But I’m going to drive forward.

I’m not going to throw it in mud puddles like I saw one review. LOL. I’m good. Clean your damn weapon before you screw it up. In the Army we field stripped and clean so much we could break them down with our eyes closed. M16 (very similar to AR15), M60 and M2 .50 cal.

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#11

I clean my EDC pistol usually after a heavy run at the range. Rifles I usually clean after about 2 trips to the range, or depending on how many rounds I feed them.

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#12

Ok this question is one I truly believe will be all over the map. You should check your equipment once a week remove any dust and dirt build up checking that it operates properly. Once a month clean and oil. And clean and oil after every use. You must be ready when you least expect it. I never worry if my weapon will malfunction due to being dirty or if a part isn’t functioning properly. When I place my firearm in it’s holster I know it’s ready if I need it. And never try to clean a firearm that YOU haven’t cleared. Trying to remove dust between the trigger and trigger guard is one of the most common accidental discharge of a firearm that ends in tragedy. SAFETY FIRST CLEAR THE WEAPON YOURSELF FIRST THING.

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#13

I have talked with someone who shot a hole in their hand and had to have numerous surgeries because he didn’t clear his gun before cleaning it.

When I heard that person’s experience, I had a hard time believing it. How could someone who was so experienced with firearms have a negligent discharge? We all get to a comfort level with firearms. That level of comfort needs to include a healthy awareness of how damaging a firearm can be and there can be no complacency when it comes to safety.

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#14

Anytime I handle my weapon to dry fire, clean it, show it to someone, I drop the mag and rack the slide to eject the round. I then rack the slide a bunch more, just to make sure and lock it back.

Even after that, when dry firing, quite a few times when I’m about to pull the trigger I’ll readjust and rack the slide again, just to make sure I did it.

If someone interrupts me while I’m doing that, I tell them to give me a minute and have them leave the room or area if possible so that I can give my undivided attention on clearing the weapon and making it safe.

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#15

I’m the same way, @Kerryman71! I’m hyper vigilant about it -especially after talk with that person who had the ND.

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#16

The way that I set up for my dry fire practice is to go to the room where I store everything. Clear my weapon, double and, tripple check then field strip it. Then take the field stripped weapon along with my Barrelblok and mag bloks to the room where I do my fry fire practice assemble, insert bloks and proceed to practice.

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#17

I set up a new topic strictly for dry fire training setup: How do you setup your dry fire training at home? Please feel free to share your dry fire training comments from this thread on that thread as well. Thanks!

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#18

Part of my training is if my weapon comes out of my holster it’s either for live fire training, self defense those would be the only time that I wouldn’t clear my weapon. Any other time I drop the mag rack and lock the slide and visually check the weapon. I keep my weapon in a holster at night so I do not mistakenly discharge it by hitting the trigger while I’m half asleep. Trust me it has happened especially when the weapons placed under their pillow or mattress or in a drawer without a trigger guard in place. One thing that most don’t think about that doesn’t fit with carrying a firearm is complacency. Safety should always be the first and foremost mind set of every second dealing with firearms. All this comes with great information being given durning forms like this which is were most first start their firearm education. Never forget that a firearm can kill when in the wrong hands or being miss used. They are not on our person to make us ten feet tall and bulletproof. They are there for self defense so first defend yourself by education and training.

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#19

Here’s a new blog article on cleaning your gun - thoughts?

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#20

I think cleaning your stuff is taking care of it is important. I clean my firearms to a pretty high standard. My dad is a mechanical engineer, and a pretty stern dude at times. He always told me that a gun is a machine. Machines need to be kept clean to extend their life and their productivity. That mentality was reinforced in the Army as well.

If I need a fouled barrel in my rifle for shooting a match at my gun club, I take it the day before, check the scope, scope rings, and dirty it up a bit, shoot the next day, then clean.

I also do not take much stock in how professional shooters take care of their guns. I put stock in how they shoot and their techniques. They put down so many rounds a year, it wouldn’t matter if they cleaned it religiously. I want my FNS9C to be functioning properly and shooting well in 10 years, I doubt any professional shooter looks at their G17 and says, I want this one to last another 10 years. Maybe I’m wrong, but you don’t get sponsored to pinch pennies, and that cleaning time could be time to make money doing something else.

So basically long story short. I clean my guns every week when they’re being used. At least.

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