How many times DO YOU FIRE. Your EDC. TO.STOP THE..THREAT ❓

If you life is in danger :bangbang: how many times do or would you fire. YOUR.EDC. TO. STOP :stop_sign: THE THREAT :question:

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As many times as needed to stop the threat.

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You answered it @BobbyJean! Once the threat is stopped!!

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Adam34 GRATE ANSWER SIR . Some times criminals . Are on drugs and or ALCOHOL. AND THEY JUST WILL NOT BE .DETERRED :bangbang:

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A few shots as possible to stop the threat

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As many as it takes to stop the threat.

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The necessary amount to stop the threat.

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And, it’s important to note, STOP shooting the moment you’re no longer in immediate danger.

We see too many stories of people who were in real danger and started shooting, but then didn’t stop when the assailant turned his back and started retreating.

Knowing exactly when to shoot and when to stop is, to me, the most important part of training we can have, and one that requires the most “mental training” and prep. It’s the giant responsibility that comes with carrying.

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That is the ideal but no one is capable of instantly recognizing and stopping. It is important for everyone to remember that it takes time for your eyes to send the images of what is happening to your brain. Then it takes time for the brain to process what those images are showing. Then usually even more time to determine if those images show that the threat has actually stopped. Then it takes more time to send a signal to the rest of your body to stop doing what it was doing.

The sending of the signals takes over a quarter second each way for the average person. The processing and decision part can take some people several seconds. Even incredibly well trained and experienced people are likely to take a least a second to identify and react to a change in threat status. Most shooters can fire 2 to 5 more rounds in that one second.

Guess what I am trying to say is that we all need to train and practice to identify and react to changing situations as rapidly as we can. But everyone needs to realize that shots or actions taken after the threat has fully and unquestionably ended may have been legitimately started when the threat was still very real.

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Agree 100 percent brother @Joseph488 .

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I’d ask how many rounds minimum you gonna shoot to stops the threat :point_up_2:

That question is more tricky because the answer is not so obvious.
Usually people don’t think about it, but when situations is very dynamic your brain must react immediately. There won’t be any time to think.

So I was always taught and had been practicing “controlled pairs” as the fist shot. If your life is in danger there’s no mercy and you don’t want risking your single shot did nothing.

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What @Jerzees said. I try to make it a habit to be ready to take another shot after every shot. In IDPA or USPSA most stages required two shots per target where I practice.

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No wonder why… :wink:
I was discussing need for two shots many times with many Instructors. Each person think about it differently, but my or my Family life is more important than anything else. Two quick shots, then check if did it work. Be ready for third shot.
Don’t forget about verbal warnings.

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I often do controlled pairs but I also practice longer strings up to 5 or so rounds.

If someone was charging at me with a knife I wouldn’t want my body to be conditioned to automatically pause and reassess after 2 shots if they were still coming at me. Hopefully I would keep firing as fast as I accurately could till they dropped, stopped and dropped their weapon or clearly turned to run away.

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That make sense… however it brings another question - how many is too many? Answer is simple, there’s no too many if your life is in danger, but too many in some situations means empty mag.

We go beyond OP question now, but rounds count for first shoots must come with plan or learned tactics.

If you start shooting creating distance the same time, you can control situation and save ammo.
2 shots without moving and attacker still running at you will force you to shoot more.
But your attacker may still run only because of blood pressure dropping down slow. When you create distance, those extra few yards may be enough to see your attacker going down. When you’re ready for next shots you take them if needed.

It’s not a formula… each confrontation is different but the point is to have a plan, constantly practice it and be ready.

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Agree that movement and use of cover are very important. I train to move as I start to draw and shoot while moving unless I can get to good cover or at least concealment. Though there are situations where I may not be able to move because I am blocked by something or the people I am with are not reacting to the threat fast enough so I would have to stand my ground to keep between them and the threat or give them time to get away. In which case I may have to fire every round I have and then use the pistol as a club if the threat doesn’t stop quickly enough.

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If I am going to do longer strings it takes me a fraction longer to get a better grip.

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For me the quality of the grip mostly affects how fast I can shoot as apposed to how many shots I can take. With a poor grip it takes me a little longer to get the front sight on target so a little longer before I can pull the trigger again.

In a self defense situation I assume that my body will be moving as quick as it can so the likelihood of shooting with an imperfect grip and stance is pretty high. Most of my practice is at slow speed to try and build the best technique possible. But when practicing at full speed I just deal with whatever imperfections occur because I likely won’t have time to fix them in a real event.

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2 to the chest 1 to the head. but really as many as it take to stop the threat.

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please… don’t do that… :joy:

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