Hiking Safety

One of the best things about summer is getting out and enjoying nature. There are a lot of great places to hike both locally and across the country.

You may have different safety concerns based on where you are regionally — from animals such as poisonous snakes and bears to difficult terrain that includes steep trails, rocks or mud.

What gear do you take with you on your hikes to best protect yourself and your loved ones?

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@Dawn Are you referring to day hikes as opposed to overnight? Big difference for me.

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Firearm wise, here in the Hill Country of Central Texas I always have the first 2 rounds of my spare mag the CCI Snake Shot. So with a quick Tac Reload and cycling the slide, snakes have no chance.

Secondly, if it is going to be in a remote area we carry a Find me Spot.
If we’re in a remote area hiking and get bit by a snake or something else where even a cell phone may work but just don’t know exactly where we are, the satellite location device will alert a call center and send immediate help.

It’s basically like dialing 911 without having to talk to anyone.

https://www.findmespot.com/en-us/products-services/spot-gen3

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This topic interests me very much.
We have cougars. rattlers, coyotes and bears in our local mountains, but they don’t present many safety issues when compared to the merchants of Meth and the pot plantations.

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I would bring my EDC which includes a firearm, extra magazine, knife, flashlight and tactical pen. I would also bring water, insect repellent and a first aid kit, a compass would be good and maybe some rations. Bring a good camping backpack to carry your gear, also have some type of fire starting equipment like matches or a lighter.

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@John292 don’t forget the traps they like to set up.

In California there is this “grey” area (and with they way they change (how fast they change) the rules, who knows if this is still in effect. So if your hiking with a side arm, I guess bring a fishing pole with ya and of course CHECK the park RULES before you go.

“” There is a California Penal Code law that allows anglers to carry a gun while fishing and while hiking to and from their angling site. California Penal Code, section 12025 prohibits carrying concealed firearms in California, however, section 12027 provides the following exemption to this prohibition: “Licensed hunters or fishermen carrying pistols, revolvers or other firearms capable of being concealed upon the person while engaged in hunting or fishing, or transporting those firearms unloaded when going to or returning from the hunting or fishing expedition.” Remember that some areas that allow fishing, such as state and national parks, and some incorporated areas where fishing is allowed prohibit the possession of any firearm. Make sure to check on the local laws where you plan to fish. The California Bureau of Firearms in the Department of Justice posts a summary of California firearm laws online at http://ag.ca.gov/firearms/. “”

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I always carry 50’ of 3/8 in. rappelling rope and 10’ of webbing w/2 biners for going up or down steep places, this has kept me from back tracking a few times. :+1:

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First aid kit, sidearm, C.A.T. tourniquets, water, high-energy food (beef jerky, trail mix, mixed nuts, etc.), spare ammunition, compass, map(s), 550 cord, spare socks, K-Bar, flashlight, cell phone…and a contingency plan.

Not perfect…but has served us well.

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Thank you, I’ll look into this!

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I know I may sound “crazy” or prepared!?
I always carry my edc equipment with me. As echoed, we have mostly copperheads, water moccasins, coyotes. My standard keychain has a mini firestarter on it along with a mini compass. Always have a first aid kit, although small, yet efficient. Bug spray, water. I actually bring my two way radios due to being in the mountains cell service gets sketchy. Usually carry some kind of high protein snack, ie. Beef jerky. Life straw, (never know)
Basically it’s a mini survival kit.
And as far as out my way, it’s moonshine and meth!

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A hike for me is 1-5 miles near civilization. That includes EDC stuff (gun, knife, mag, phone).
In the truck is my bug in bag (everything needed for 48 hours, so sometimes I"ll grab that pack and make sure there’s 2 liters of water in it and I"m good to go.
If I don’t take the whole pack, I grab the water and the boo boo kit, sunscreen and bug repellant and take off.
Sometime the good SLR camera.
Usually the wife and I will have dogs with us, so it’s more water and a collapsible dish.

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survival kit, first aid kit, 24 hour food, socks, and gun, for a “day hike” Nothing worse than having to scare of a bear or mountain lion. I am not sure about Sasquatch!

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@Todd30–I doubt he’ll scare easily. :slight_smile:

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A rifle and handgun if allowed, bear Mace, enough Paracord to keep food and refuse up in the air. Sat. Phone, GPS, Wilderness IFAK (that’s quite a bit different from my EDC IFAC

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What is the difference between the two IFAKs? Guessing maybe the addition of snakebite kit and/or sting kit…?

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Additional Braces and types, C collar, solar blankets, additional lifestraws, 2 individual one man tents.

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Water
Pocket knife
Matches
Hat

Often times I’ll add
Compass
Sun screen
Mosquito repellent
A small camera
Hiking staff
Sweatshirt or wind breaker
A small first aid kit

Back packing would require a different load out.

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@John292 - ya know that’s just a really good day hike setup

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That’s right.
My CCW doesn’t change unless I’m heading for a more hazardous locale or using a different form of locomotion (horse, canoe, etc…)

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My kids and I have had a few black bear encounters on the Appalachian Trail. Need to stay aware and scan ahead of your path. Don’t press them and they will eventually amble off. Patience is a virtue. Keep food suspended at night. :bear:

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