Handling firearms in my apartment

I’m a soon to be gun owner here, trying to think through every aspect of owning and carrying before I purchase my first handgun. I live on the 4th (top) floor of a midrise style apartment building, and I would appreciate any advice about these concerns:

  1. per the fourth universal rule I’m worried about administrative handling like at-home training and cleaning since I don’t know if it’s ok to muzzle any of the four walls. Two are shared by other apartments, one has the shared hallway behind it, and the other has windows facing the space above the central courtyard.
    I am also concerned about muzzling the floor when carrying/training since there is another apartment directly below mine.

  2. I will be regularly driving to places that do not allow firearms so I will sometimes need to leave my gun in my car. If I had my own garage I could easily and privately transfer my gun to the trunk or a locked case as required by CA laws, but I have to walk from my door through hallways to the shared garage where there is no privacy around my car. I guess I am broadly curious how you might discreetly transfer a handgun from holster to car or vice versa in a public place.

3 Likes

Do not train in your apartment with live ammo. Use a laser bullet or snap caps.
Sirt, ITarget pro, a couple training devices. I’m sure others will add to the list.
Can’t suggest a detailed method of stealth weapon transfer as I don’t know your environment. I used to keep a lock box under the driver seat,cabled to the seat frame. Slid it out to the floor, put the pistol away, locked the box and slid back under the seat.

15 Likes

Have the lockbox in your car easily accessible from the driver seat if possible. I can discreetly I unholster my firearm and lock it up in the car and vice versa. Look around first to see if anyone is paying too much attention to you. Otherwise, most people are too focused on their own business to worry about yours.

If you’re looking for a safe way to load/unload your firearm in your apartment, a metal bucket or large ammunition can filled with sand should take care of any accidental discharges.

9 Likes

Clearing gun at home.
1)drop mag
2) rack slide to eject round in chamber.

Cali is crazy. Pretty strict gun laws yet let’s folks get a permit w/o any training.
3) get some training, gun handling/live fire. Either an experienced friend or a club/NRA course…

I got into an argument with a guy from Cali, thinking he was a troll. Then I looked up their permitting process. :duck:me… written test, good to go

4 Likes

when handling the firearm at home with live rounds, there are two appliances that are most likely to provide an adequate backstop: refrigerator or air conditioner.

7 Likes

I definitely wasn’t planning to train with live ammo, I was more worried about “always treating the gun like it’s loaded”, but yeah I suppose training devices should eliminate the main risk.
Thanks, I’ll look into lock boxes like that!

4 Likes

Thanks, I’ll definitely use the bucket idea!

4 Likes

Ah, great idea, thanks!

2 Likes

Great post. I often learn new safety tips each time I read up here.

I also choose a specific corner within my residence, and when having to handle or touch, I keep the muzzle pointed in the safest direction. I found a thick brick wall where on the opposite side there is no residence adjacent. I feel more comfortable there.

Makes me wonder if I move to a larger home, I could actually build 2-3 portable walls of bricks to help protect, perhaps a layer of wood on the inside to help absorb and prevent ricochet, “God Forbid.”

Dude. Good for you. You haven’t even owned yet and you are already thinking sophisiticatedly. Peace.

5 Likes

I have great appreciation for your thought process and cause for concern. Please study the laws of your state. Definitively know who you are willing to protect. If it’s just yourself, that’s ok! Situational awareness is key.

  1. Know, recite and apply the universal rules of handling a firearm.

  2. Unless faced with the ultimate decision of defending yourself, KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER.

  3. Practice your draw, reholster, and stance with an empty firearm. Yes, there is a noticeable weight difference empty verses loaded. However, that why there are shooting ranges.

  4. Unload your firearm with your muzzle pointing downward over your bed. Assuming you don’t have a waterbed or single mattress. Most defensives rounds are not likely to travel through a mattress, box spring, floor and ceiling. It’s possible but not likely. Just keep your finger off the trigger.

7 Likes

Get a 5 gallon plastic bucket and fill it with sand. Use it to clear your firearm or chamber a round before leaving. Point downward into the bucket to get the maximum amount of sand. That should help avoid negligent discharges that go through apartment walls or floors/ceilings.

9 Likes

Do you already have a CA CCW permit? If not I am pretty sure that CA requires your handgun be transported in a locked case whether you are in your car or going from your car to your home or other legal place. So transferring from holster to a locked case in the car would probably be illegal without the permit. Unless there is some legal language somewhere exempting public areas in an apartment complex and garage that the possessor resides in??

CA is an anti self defense State. Make sure you are completely up to speed on all the State, County and local laws or you can unknowingly lose what few self defense rights you have as well as potentially your freedom.

8 Likes

Yes, I am aware of that requirement in CA. I will apply for a ccw as soon as I purchase a gun so I was asking with my expected future routine in mind.

5 Likes

For discreetly transferring your handgun to a vehicle lockbox it depends on where you’ll keep your lockbox.
I keep mine in the trunk because passenger compartments get broken into all the time in my ''hood and yes, perps take the time to feel around under the driver’s seat,
I’ll suggest looking for an easily removeable holster and practice “palming” your pistol and holster as one, putting it into the lockbox.
For a lock box, Liberty is an inexpensive route (Harbor Freight is even cheaper.)
The FAS-1 models are far superior and, I think, well worth it, but AFAIK
it’s not CA DOJ approved,( I hope that’s changed.) Thicker steel, a better lock and more secure mounting, but go figure, this is CA.
A 5 gallon bucket of sand is cheap insurance when loading and unloading your pistol in your apartment. It’s what we used at the Peace Officer’s Range. Put it on a chair at a comfortable height and point your muzzle into it when chambering and unloading,

4 Likes

Question, as I don’t know much about California. Do they not allow you to transport firearms from your car to your home?if they do, just discreetly throw it in a backpack/lunchbox/whatever, and go straight from your car to your home?

2 Likes

It depends on who the sheriff is. mattm. Different counties have different requirements.

3 Likes

I heard about that, but also read California is a “shall issue” state?

2 Likes

IIRC, without having a CCW, it needs to be unloaded in a locked container.
If you have a CCW, it needs to be concealed.
But I’m not a lawyer and I didn’t spend the night at a Holiday Inn Express nor watch any courtroom dramas on SLING TV,
And the laws have probably changed since you started reading this anyway.
That’s the way Gov. Newsom rolls in CA.

5 Likes

Hadn’t thought of that, but now that you mention it yes it should be allowed based on the “destination” criteria that I’ve read about, even for transporting without a ccw.

2 Likes

That sucks if that’s the case… sorry citizens of California :expressionless:

4 Likes