Front sight movement after break when dry firing

Greetings all! Hoping to get some insight regarding the front sights movement when dry firing. When the shot “breaks” my front sights move just a hair nothing crazy, stable enough to keep a snapcap balanced on the sight. Is that normal? If I don’t reset the trigger and just do the pull straight back I see virtually zero movement. Look forward to feedback and tips thank you!
Firearm: Canik tp9 elite sc
Strikerfire

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Normal for most. For validation and some great suggestions checkout the USCCA Protector Academy video selection…especially the section of grip and SIRT training. The dual laser SIRT pistols provide excellent feedback in this regard because it gives correlation between your point of aim when you start your trigger press and where it is when you release the striker.

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I think it is both normal, and what you are trying to eliminate.

When you pull the trigger and release the sear, springs will make parts move, hammers or strikers will suddenly go forward and then suddenly stop. Inertia of those moving parts makes the gun jump. When you don’t reset the trigger, none of that inertial movement happens — just you and your fingers, which are easier for most of us to control.

A “perfect” grip — not too strong, not too weak, hands in all the right places — will dampen the movement produced by the internal parts jumping around. When it comes to live fire, there is even more of the same going on — powder blows this way, bullet flies that way, slide jumps into motion, etc.

More practice makes less motion, less motion means better accuracy — if you’re doing it right.

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Hey @HeyT :wink:

Based on the topic I’m assuming the movement occurs after the shot was taken, so minimal movement during dry fire session when resetting the trigger has nothing common with recoil and muzzle flip during live fire.
You will never control front sight with live ammo to keep snapcap on it.
The only movement you want to eliminate is between trigger’s wall and break. Other movement doesn’t matter.

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That ^

There is likely going to be some movement as you reset the trigger. Many guns IME even have some movement when the shot breaks due to the internal forces of the hammer/striker/springs.

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You are now officially validated.

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:roll_eyes: No one here is Robo Cop.

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You might look into overtravel-stop triggers. I don’t know if they are available for your firearm. If you’re not comfortable with experimenting with trigger options keep it stock. If you’re groups are tight on paper, don’t worry about it.

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That’s what I mean, sorry not so great at explaining sometimes. I come back to the wall, sights are steady then the break and I have a hair of movement. I cant seem to eliminate that

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It’s normal IME

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No worries about the explanation. At least I understood what you meant. Not all of us are familiar with all terminology so I’m ok with that.

If you see movement during the break, so it happens exactly at the moment the bullet is coming out from the chamber and the muzzle may be slightly off the target. That’s a theory. How much this movement will affect the accuracy? You don’t know until you test it either on the range or using laser cartridge and target at home.

These days laser will be less expensive option. Pink Rhino 9mm laser cartridge costs $39. Good laser target with sound feedback costs about $90.

I’m using 1.5" target at 25’ distance for dry fire practice. If you consistently hit with laser even with movement, extend the distance or make the target smaller (my target cannot be smaller).
In my opinion, if you find consistency hitting the target from 30’ - your movement of the front sight doesn’t change the muzzle position, meaning your POA=POI

(POA ->Point of Aim; POI ->Point of Impact)

If you find the movement being the problem with accuracy - tighten your grip, especially support hand and focus on proper trigger press.

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