Does the ATF have a record of my guns?

I have had guns in the past that I no longer have and could not tell you where they are now. Maybe they went down on that boat that sunk in the Atlantic. But really, do they have a list of my guns?

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I don’t think so. Firearm’s SN is kept by manufacturer and FFL.
If nothing happens - it stays this way. If the firearm is used in crime… then the process starts.

  1. based on model, they look for manufacturer
  2. manufacturer points to store
  3. store points to FFL or buyer
  4. FBI knocks the owner’s front door

if you have no idea why the firearm was used in crime… that’s another story…
Hopefully yours are still in the bottom of Atlantic :wink:

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Todd, Jerzy has given a very and accurate answer to your question. Of course the ATF has a record if the gun was sold and the seller used a 4473 form.
Lets face the government knows more about you than you ever thought possible. I have a friend that allways is saying the government is not getting my information, wrong he is a 20 year vetern, they know everything.
Private sales or sales of guns be fore serial number will be harder to trace, but I sure some civil servant is working on that.
Larry

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I’m not sure but I believe they have some information regarding our weapons, if our info is in a computer I believe they can have access to that information.

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As long as you purchased the gun from an FFL (Federal Firearms Licensees) you will fill out the 4473 for a background check or your CCW will be used as your background check. Either way, FFLs have to know who they are selling guns to and track who they sell each and every gun to (by serial number).

Until you sell your gun (through an FFL), your gun is associated with you. If you sell your gun privately, please get a copy of the buyer’s information for your safety!!

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If they wanted to do the legwork, they could eventually be traced to you. Take the serial number to the manufacturer, manufacturer to the distributor, distributor to gun store, manually look through ALL the gun store records until they find the 4473 matching that serial number. Your name on the 4473.

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I dont worry about it. Do I think they have it? I dont know, but I do know they know enough about me that even if they dont know what I have specifically. I have a CPL, I have suppressors, I am a life member of the NRA, Elite USCCA, SCI, DSCI. I buy hunting licenses every year in multiple states. I am on the radar, and have been for some time. I used to worry about it, pay cash only for all my hunting and shooting related items to keep the purchases off my bank radar, etc. but I gave up with that thinking. Those that care already know about me and nothing I do or dont do will change it. I am not happy about it, but I cant change it, so why worry about it. They know you too. All of you. Just a statement of fact for all of us as gun owners. Look at what we are doing. We are posting on a pro 2A (I know, not specifically) site. You dont think they are monitoring this site and the thousands like it?

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To show your activities and your support for the 2 A is important to support it. The more the merrier. If 17 Million people have Conceal weapons permit, imagine how many people actually own guns.

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Which is why every firearm you have fell over the side of the boat in the deepest water.

@Jerzy, so that’s a yes in a roundabout way :thinking:

NO. The proper answer is NO - ATF doesn’t have a record of firearm.

This information has to be retrieved from other agencies. And it is not a simple process. There is no database or file in cabinet ATF can open and search.

They call it “firearm tracing” for purpose… somebody has to spend time to trace it… step by step…

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Thank you!

Except that some FFL’s are doing 4473’s electronically now, and WA State is requiring submissions in PDF format for local background check. Once it’s electronic, the only thing keeping it from easy access by any and all government agencies is bureaucracy.

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So there was about a 7-8 year period where I didn’t bother having a firearm somewhat recently, and I had an incident here…

I got into a traffic collision a few weeks after getting my first gun since that hiatus.
Officer shows up, runs my ID. Have not gotten my CCW/LTCF yet (EDIT: at time of incident, … ), and as such, was not carrying.

Officer asks if I have my gun with me.

I think they know a lot more than they are supposed to. With the ATF specifically, IDK. But I am pretty sure that info isn’t supposed to be accessible (and therefore in a registry) to local cops on a traffic stop.

Surely comes from the PICS check (NICS through the PA State Police)…? Anyone know for sure?

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If we think this way, we find out that everyone has any information about anybody in USA :slightly_smiling_face:

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Yes, and your point is? Lets face if you go on google type in a name some information will surface. I try to limit the onformation that I provide and some have said I am to skeptical, so what?
The electronic data base is just that electronic, lets look at this if the Pentagon can be hack some low ranking clerk can retrive in formation and for a small amount of money provide that to whoever will pay for it.
My trust of the Government can not be any lower.

Larry

My point is that the answer for the question is NO.

You have a cell phone. Your cell phone has a gps and a nic ID. There is a good chance your car has a gps and cell modem as well.
The way I figure it if you have nothing to hide you have nothing to worry about and if your a person of interest you have no secrets.

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OK, your opinion.

Larry

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Yes, it’s my opinion based on facts.
How log does it take to search internet using Google or DuckDuckGo engines? I would say less than 1 second. If I want to find address associated with a person - also 1 second. This is example to having records of something.
ATF doesn’t have database to match the person with firearm. It can be done only by National Tracing Center with valid trace request. It doesn’t take 1 or 10 seconds… usually tracing process takes 7 - 9 days. In some cases this period can be shorten to 1 day. And this is TRACING, nothing even close to having information on hand.

So the answer for question from the topic is - NO. What has to be done to find the match between firearm and owner was not the case here.

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