Do you train proper reactions for unusual circumstances being at the Range?

Check this out and think how would YOU react after being struck by ejected casing.

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Thank you for sharing… I’m sure he’s counting his blessings as we type. It’s good that this story gets out there so we can all remember the safety rules…

Muzzle Discipline
Finger Discipline
Pass Through Potential

No such thing as an accidental discharges. Only negligent discharges.

Best regards,
Jason

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DO
Put gun down, pointed down range.
DON’T
Don’t dance like a sissy while removing hot brass.

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Finish drill, or just holster/put gun down. Then back off firing line and do the hot brass dance. :grinning:

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Maybe that’s how we should treat unintended pregnancies and start prosecuting those that do it outside of marriage.

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Goes to show you the importance of finger discipline!

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Yeah… and that’s why I like NRA’s safety rules. They use word ALWAYS !

A 2021-06-23 17-20-14

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Hey @Jerzy, thanks for sharing this. Though I feel like we see one of these episodes at least every few months or so, it’s never too frequent that we shouldn’t pause and think about how important safety discipline is.

When I took my first safety/ccw course, my USCCA instructor told us he never goes to indoor ranges. I don’t know if these sorts of accidents (not hot brass, but poor discipline, and the bad results that sometimes follow) happen more often in the close proximity of indoor ranges than outdoors. They’re certainly caught more on video, obviously.

I’ve never shot at an indoor range, always outdoors, and generally alone. I like being my own RSO. I like taking that responsibility for myself (and for the occasional cows I find downrange before I set up to shoot), and I like the discipline it puts upon me. I get to control the tempo.

So to (finally) answer your question, yes I do train, because when something unusual happens, something I didn’t anticipate, I just stop and review what’s going on right then and there. I don’t worry about the clock, how much session time I have left, I log it and analyze it and prepare for what if it or something like it happens again. (I’m not saying I do this perfectly, but I do it.)

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Seems he should qualify for a Darwin Awards Honorable Mention. :thinking:
Are we seeing this more often because people have bought firearms without proper training?
I also carry a full trauma bag to the range.

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Who needs “proper” training when Hollywood has everything covered from how to shoot a gun out of someone’s hand to fighting off a score of professional assassins?

I could (we all could) go off on a rant about this, but rather I’ll suggest that many people who don’t own guns, or at least haven’t in the recent past, are so influenced by movies and other media that they actually think much of what they see is true. Hence the “fire two shotgun blasts,” or “shoot’em in the leg” advice from the current resident of the White House.

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True story: Last time I was at a public indoor range, there were two people in the bay next to me. At one point I backed up and looked over at them and the one person was holding a fully loaded pistol with his finger firmly on the trigger pointed right at my bay. But I guess since he couldn’t see me, it counted as a “safe direction” in his mind. I waited until they had finished shooting and I packed up and left. On the way out I mentioned to the guy on duty why I was leaving. “Happens all the time,” he muttered before turning back to look at his phone again.

I’ve never gone back.

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:roll_eyes:

Good plan.

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Reminds me of an old cartoon:

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Lucky he’s alive, good thing no one else was near this clown. My guess would be he’s a new guy that’s not going to forget this lesson. Next time he’ll stop acting like a little girl. If you been around for awhile, you’ve had a fair share of brass in your shirt, glasses, hair & other places not to be mentioned.

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My favorite comic… and rat is awesome. Follow his philosophy, and you’ll never be disappointed.

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If you see someone setting up to shoot a auto loader rifle on our left side with no dividers, ask them to move to anther position or, you can move. As we all know some people can be very inconsiderate and cause safety issues. When it comes to safety, speak up in a constructive manner. If that doesn’t work your rifle butt will -uooops that was a accident. Cant do that but we would like to. PS: got a question = did you ever hear anybody say “ watch you eyes “ ? Just wondering how to watch your eyes ? { I make ha-ha }
:us::us::us:

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:rofl:

One of my favorite outdoor ranges has a posted safety rule: “No egos.” It was added specifically because of a certain thin-skinned member who also happened to be an NRA instructor. He could not stand to be corrected by anyone on the range, no matter how serious his safety violations were.

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@Ouade5 >> call his safety violations to the attention of the range owner or, board members if it’s a club. I know his kind. That’s when I have to watch myself
[ HAPPY THOUGHTS BLACKY ] PS : if it’s a up to date range it might have cameras to show range activity, my club does.
:us::us::us:

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The board members already straightened him out. That’s when they added the “No egos” rule. We haven’t seen that specific member in awhile, I think he moved on to another club.

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Agreed … a hot brass shower can be expected; it all part of the range experience. It’s a perfect opportunity not to let it become a distraction. On my last range trip just about four out of five 10 mm casings came my way over the ballistic partition. I pushed through it and did not let it distract me

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