Confused about the best bedside gun safe

Ive been trying to figure out what the best solution is for a bedside gun safe that is secure and easy to access as I abruptly get woken from a deep sleep. I like the idea of RFID if I can use a ring (which Im more likely to wear on a normal basis). Are biometrics better? I hear of people having issues with it not reading their fingerprint every time. I also want something that isn’t ugly to look at on my nightstand. Though I like the idea of an app on my phone to alert me of tamper and gives me the ability to access, does this give the ability for someone to access that I don’t want to?

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I don’t have a lot of experience with different brands, but I do have a GunVault safe next to my bed. I also didn’t trust the fingerprint scanners so I went with the safe that requires a code. There are a lot of options for these and I would suggest you look and try to find what would be best for you. I will link their website below.

I prefer simple and less complex systems just because I feel that the more technology something has, the more places there could be a failure.

https://gunvault.com/safes/

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I’d rather go with RFID, though I don’t have experience with it, Biometric scanners take a couple tries.

I think this varies, both across brands but also people. I have very weak fingerprints, and often struggle with fingerprint readers. There’s no way I would ever put a fingerprint scanner between me and my hold defense. But I’m just weird that way, they might be a great solution for some people.

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Consider a “disguised” storage option (such as a nightstand with a hidden drop-down shelf). My firearm goes into its night storage when I go to bed and back into the safe when I get up. I also have no one in the family I have to worry about touching it in the night. For me, therefore, a lock - of any kind - I don’t consider necessary. This also avoids the issue of fumbling around trying to open a lock box or the batteries going dead.

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I have the Wincent bedside box, which has both fingerprint bio and a 4 digit digital release, so you can use either. The memory can hold 100 fingerprints, so I put in about 10 to 15 each for my two thumbs and two index fingers. Once I had all those set up, I have never needed to fall back to the combination buttons. It also has a physical key for backup.
The model I have, and several others, are large enough for two pistols , or alternately a pistol still in the holster. Whether you go RFID, bio/combo, combo, or key, I recommend getting one large enough to handle the holstered pistol. It makes it both quicker and safer to store and retrieve the gun each day.

I use the Vaultek Slider behind my nightstand. I unlock and open it at night before going to bed and close the drawer when my alarm wakes me in the morning. I figure one less thing to deal with when woken abruptly in the middle of the night.

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I personally would not go with fingerprint scanners based on my experience with cellphones. Half the time it takes multiple tries and if thumb or finger is moist from sweat it’s even worse. RFID is pretty reliable based on my past experience with it in commercial settings, not gun safe wise. I would get something that is AC powered with a battery backup (preferably rechargeable that is maintained while on AC power) to ensure the RFID reader is always powered.

This is great advice. My car safe is not tall enough to handle mine in the holster. MAJOR drawback that’s all on me for not making sure it would fit. My shotty measurement foiled me. :rofl:

or you can do what I did…


BUT WAIT THERES MORE!

Thank you all. This advice is helping. I also just spoke to a friend of mine who is an electronic engineer and he brought up a good point. RFID is going to be faster in its process time whereas biometric takes a bit more time to read and process. So I am definitely going with RFID. I want to find one that will read the RFID ring because I would wear that on a normal basis.

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I know it’s not what you’re asking, and you may already be ahead of me in this, but to me the first thing that comes to mind when somebody expresses concern about needing to access a firearm right now when awoken from a dead sleep, is that this person might also benefit from beefing up their home security.

Monitored alarm that sounds immediately (no entry delay) with sensors on every door and accessible window that is armed (can set reminders in apps now), solid strike plates with long screws, deadbolts, NightLock or similar door barricades, etc. Things that might outright send a potential intruder somewhere else or at least make noise and buy time for you to shake the cobwebs out while the alarm is going off and they are huffing and puffing after working to defeat the barrier to get in.

For my quick access that is accessible near where I sleep they all have Simplex locks.

Like this:

For bedside use - one large enough for firearm, holster, two spare mags (loaded), flashlight, and a box of ammo. I also have a CAT in mine, but that’s just me.

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