Carry when you are at home - Here's Why

Total stranger breaks in, attacks the people then starts the place on fire. This is a $1.2 million house in a rather up scale part of Centerville. We can’t be certain but we can assume, had the “elderly people” been armed they may have been able to stop this D—Head.

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Dang Mike, you sure aren’t helping the Utah real estate market with your posts :rofl:. One methed up state.

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It seems there is something a little off in the Land of Zion.

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I am always carrying I’m POGO pants on gun on

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I am always prepared to defend my home. When people ask me why would I carry in my house, I tell them 100% of home invasions happen inside the home. They all do the same head tilt as it starts to sink in and make sense to them.

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Studies show that 100% of home invasions happen in the home.

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Interesting side note: a local police sgt showed up at my door who didn’t like critism… he asked if I carried in the house… i asked why…he said “that’s odd, i could take your guns away”, to which i responded “go ahead”. He didn’t, but i did file a complaint because of his stupid comment.

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I am always curious when there is a report of a “break in” whether doors were left unlocked (usually for cars, but also sometimes for homes) or whether force was actually used to break something to get in.

This article is kind of unclear

“Ackerson explained that there was a physical altercation with the homeowners after the intruder somehow entered their house.”

As an example ^

There is nothing specific in there about kicking in a door, or breaking this or that, or exactly how the intruder got in. Unfortunately I think a lot of things like this happen where a securely locked door may have made all the difference. So many people leave doors unlocked, especially in areas with homes that nice.

My personal opinion is locked (and upgraded security like longer screws, reinforcements, etc) are even more valuable than carrying in the home. But. I am also carrying in my house as I type this right now, so…let’s go with BOTH for the win hehe

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My wife walked across the street to her parents today. She called me to unlock the door to let her back in. That’s how much of a habit we are in with locking our doors. I agree with your post 100%. Always lock your doors.

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Have you heard of this irresponsible type of humans, called children? They like to go outside and never lock the door.

What I liked about the article, they describe the suspect as armed with gasoline. MSM typically quotes an uncle “he is a sweet boy, but his suffered from mental illness and the society failed him”

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Oh Lord, don’t tell me what town you live in, but if you like, what state do you live in? If you don’t want to say that is perfectly fine. Just a terribly stupid and quite frankly disturbing comment from law enforcement , much less a Sgt. As a retired career LEO I hate hearing that type of comment. Glad you filed a complaint, let us know if anything comes from it.

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Bellevue, Nebraska. They hired a woke police chief a couple of years ago who is more worried about gender and racial hires and more about the “image” of the department so much so that the it is going to heck in a hand basket. An active shooter about a year ago… 16 min. response time and an officer from another jurisdiction finally made entrance and saved 2 lives… 2 more might have been saved if “officer safety” wasn’t an issue… reminds me of Uvalde.

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I didn’t read about any children present in the article linked.

And FWIW, my children lock the door after coming back inside through it. Teaching/training that starts early sticks with you for life pretty easily, after all.

'course, if children are playing outside, doors probably aren’t locked, wouldn’t want to lock them out, but, that doesn’t seem to be the case here (and I would hope that if children were playing outside thus requiring unlocked doors, the adults would be paying enough attention to the kids that the adults would recall exactly how the intruder got into the house)

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In reality, I understand the need to lock up. Always do.
But were you locked is not a legitimate question. No one has a right to enter my property uninvited. Period.
So while the need for locks is real, the question of locks is irrelevant.

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Right you are. We shouldn’t need locks on doors, we shouldn’t need security tags and scanners at stores, and we definitely shouldn’t need to carry firearms for potential defense against other people. We shouldn’t even have to have situational awareness to try to avoid potential attacks.

But, we do.

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My military dad always had a gun hidden but in easy reach at every entrance. In addition, he carried even just watching tv. I often thought it was excessive but now that I’m getting older myself I can see every day in the news where carrying at home is just a safety thing. **

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Welcome to the family Debbie13!

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This is a good idea - carrying in the home:

  1. Statistically, a home invasion might not be something most of us would expect, but it’s certainly possible.
  2. If it’s on your person, it’s hard for someone else to get at it.
  3. Probably iwb or some other mode of concealed carry is best - fewer questions from your kids/grandkids and visitors.
  4. You will get used to carrying everywhere; it becomes as natural as putting on your belt.
    If you knew when and where bad guys would strike, you would either avoid the location or have the police waiting. Semper paratus.
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Welcome to the Community @Debbie13. We’re glad to have you as a part of the family.