California: Man shot in leg during training class at sheriffs facility

What would you have done if this happened in a class you were taking?

3 Likes

Grab my trauma bag, Make eye contact with another and direct them to call 911. Check for trained EMT staff at hand. Observe wound flow while throwing on my gloves. IF arterial flow, apply direct pressure asap, get another person to use a clean cloth and assume applying direct pressure. Pull tourniquet off my belt and slide strap under and up high to the top of the leg, tighten and check for a pulse. Confirm EMS is on their way, reiterate command if required. Check for pass through, Attend to blow-out side first if necessary, pack full and tight, Do same for inbound, wrap with combat bandage applying pressure over the wound site, and prepare for transport. Await EMS or hand off to them when they’re informed and ready to take over.

Oh, and the dumb 12345… that didn’t physically confirm clear tube…? Ah well, at least their charge during this class lived. I hope they both learned a lesson.

Oh and I hope to gawd my patient doesn’t go deep shocky or we’ve got a whole 'nuther skill tree to climb.

6 Likes

If this would happened on the range I’m using - I wouldn’t be helpful at all. The staff is ready to take an action in such situations, so the only activity from me would be to follow their instructions.

This particular situation: 100% fail following 4 basic rules. Bad, bad, bad. I doubt this guy is still “range staff member”.

2 Likes

@Jerzy You remind me to bring that point up. So many times it is filling out their forms for liability and releases et al. Visiting a new range, and before going out there amongst your peers, it seems to me it would be a good time to ask who their medic on duty is - IF they have one. And or take a moment to get the feel of how effective the staff would be if a trauma injury occurred at their business. These days I’m expecting to tourniquet myself if need be, but it would be ever-so-nice to know someone’s there to hold my hand while we wait for the bus.

3 Likes

First, I’d laugh hysterically and point and call names. Then I’d be fake outraged. Then I’d blame the victim ( we are in California after all). Then I’d ask for a coloring book and a safe space. Joking aside, grab my trauma kit and apply some of that there Pressure I’ve heard about.

3 Likes

100% agree with Chris4, I couldn’t say it any better. :+1:

1 Like

Chris,

You have an almost perfect reply, but when I was a flight medic in the military for my team in the military and then a flight trauma medic for both Ca. and Al. Has it changed where when a tourniquet is applied that you write the time in big letters across the forehead that you applied the tourniquet? So the Surgeons could make better decisions.

Just asking, cause that for a trauma medic that was right up there, with all guns are loaded until proven otherwise, and I never see that now when I see that topic come up.

1 Like

I’m not properly trained so if there are others more capable of assisting, I’d get out of the way, call 911 and ask if there was anything I could do to help. I’d like to get trained since I shoot regularly and also hike a lot.

2 Likes

First thing is scene safety. All weapons need to be holstered or otherwise made safe. Call or have someone call 911. Assess the injury and start first aid with whatever you have available personally or at the range following ABCs to stabilize until EMS arrives.

3 Likes

I love the responses. Not one of you got outraged by the fact that it happened in the class (well, not really :wink: ).

You were all ready to jump in and help if needed.

After the immediate situation was handled, what wound you do? Would you consider taking a class there again?

2 Likes

@Zavier_D You are absolutely right. Thank you for remarking it and making the point clear to everyone… Time matters: especially in cases of amputations where you have the pieces.( and another skill set to study) Reminds me: Carry a sharpie ink pen everywhere! Oh, many modern CAT, RAT, SOFTT(W)'s have a white tab or lock strap printed with the word TIME where you can write it!

Thanks, Dennis, most appreciated. Hopefully, we made a difference in someone’s tomorrow.

1 Like

Dawn? can I pass on the wound? One in a week, or month is more than plenty for me. About taking a class there at that range, again… Since it IS the RSO (sry: Riverside County Sheriff’s Office) training center for those Civilians seeking to acquire a concealed carry license in a conditional issue State and that County’s Sheriff is one of very few in the State of California trying to do the ‘right thing’… Ya, I’d go back. Not the same instructor, and I"d go to the Armor shop first for a complete 3+ vest/side panels and helmet. …and everyone who I meet there who asks me what’s up with the flack gear - read this here story…

1 Like

Just went through a Tourniquet training refresher with a Red Cross instructor at my employer and that very question was asked. The instructor said, the “preferred” method is to write the time on the tourniquet in the designated spot on the tourniquet, usually near the windlass. However, given the circumstances of the incident, you can write it on the ARM or LEG closest to the tourniquet if permissible, and the forehead is still an option if the others are not. But in the end do what is field expedient for the patient. Chest, arms, forehead, butt, whatever. Just make sure that when you hand off to the medical personnel they are informed of what you wrote and where you wrote it.

2 Likes

Call an immediate “Cease Fire” instruct everyone to put their weapons down, muzzle down range and leave the range, grab the trauma bag, go to work and have those already designated to enact the emergency plant to “get to work” and get EMS on the way.

I don’t care how experienced you are, one split second of complacency with firearms can end tragically just as this demonstrates.

Fortunately it looks like the victim is going to be just fine.

2 Likes

When I was a flight medic it was for my EOD team in the Navy, and then for Hospitals in CA. and Al. this was early 80’s to early 90, the reasoning back then was that
a) very unlikely to be a tourniquet around neck.
b) face and forehead we’re usually clean so surgeons would see.

But heck CPR has changed at least 6-7 times since then, so was curious.

1 Like

^^^ that right there

3 Likes

Unfortunately - This is Not surprising.
Historically - Most Police, who are shot, are shot in the Right Foot or Leg.
Usually trying to re-holster a loaded gun.

Unfortunately many, if not Most Police, do Not necessarily make good instructors.
Most don’t really shoot that much.
Most are not Trained Instructors.
AND - Most don’t really make good instructors.

Good Cops, maybe, but not good Firearms “Instructors”.
Being a good teacher/Instructor takes a different set of skills and training.

In this and many other cases:
Cop or student tries to put gun back in holster, finger stays on trigger,
finger is blocked by holster, gun continues down into holster - BANG.
See youtube videos showing this.

Another part of the problem - Most Police only shoot 1-200 rds/Yr!
Just enough to do mandatory Yearly or Semi-yearly Qualify.

If you want to learn Real, Hardcore, Gun Safety - Sign-up to shoot in a Competition.
Or - Take classes from an actual - Certified “Instructor”.

3 Likes