20 vs 12 gauge

Thank you again for the question and an opportunity to learn. I’m familiar with birdshot, but not so familiar with buckshot categories. You helped me find that out. For those not familiar, I found the below helpful. Good to keep learning. Shotguns are awesome.

2 Likes

For HD?
Choose one or the other, not both.
Buy only the ammo in the gauge that your shotgun is chambered for.
Keeping stocks of more than one gauge is inviting disaster
Either will launch Buck with authority and the recipient certainly won’t know the difference,
The worse case scenario is when you chamber a 20ga shell in a 12 ga gun, nothing happens and then you load a 12 ga. shell, turning your shotgun into a bomb.

Don’t do that.

Skeet shooters often shoot a variety of gauges as serious competition demands, but they are more “with it” than your average gunnerman.
For HD that’s not what’s at issue.

Out of curiosity:
Do those of you who have a shotgun for home defense keep the same type of ammo loaded in it? Or is there an “escalation of ammo” in your magazine?

I’m not looking to start an argument either way, just curious if anyone purposely loads their shotgun with different types of rounds.

1 Like

No, 5 rounds of steel T-shot (54 .20cal pellets) in the gun and 3 Slugs and 2 OO Buck in a 5 round
stock holder. :us:

1 Like

I do have a shotgun in a quick safe in the home, though it is not intended to be a first choice, generally. But, it should be up to the task.

Cruiser ready (empty chamber, bolt forward, safety on). Tube filled with a tight patterning 00 buck. Side saddle with 2 more shells of buck and also 2 slugs. Brass up on the slugs and brass down on the buck (for consistent differentiation in addition to appearance, and anticipate most likely using buck to feed the tube vs slug to feed the chamber but really, they are on the gun so that’s what matters for availability)

3 Likes

For HD I keep 00 Buck.
Old habits die hard.

3 Likes

#4 buck, 00 buck, then slug. If we get to number 3, then the bovine excrement has definitely hit the fan.

2 Likes

Ya I am partial to the Ithaca 37 in 12 Ga rifle sites and smooth bore
throws the Lyman 525 gr slug in a nice tight group out to 100 yards
as for 00 buck I use a 6 pellet load @ about 1550fps
little to no recoil with that 1 oz load

Mike

1 Like

looking for another 37 to customize with a pistol grip and a looped front grip
just not too many of them up here in the Keweenaw

Mike

1 Like

BTW the closest neighbors are a half mile a way :smile:

Mike

2 Likes

Honestly i think the recoil from a shot gun is far less vs. a hunting rifle.

2 Likes

That depends a lot on ammo choices. I’ll stick with mostly “defensive” loads. 2 3/4 number 4 buck, is a lot less than a slug. 2 3/4 00 is closer to a 2 3/4 slug, but, 3 inch high brass loads really pack a wallop. 3 inch slugs, well, I’d rather a 308 over that. I can handle the big boys, but my wife can’t even come close. My son, who shoots trap with my 12 gauge, would have a hard time with 3 inch slugs. And he shoots shotgun easily 5 times as much as I do. I wouldn’t say calibers like .308, and 6.5 Creedmor are the threshold for what is being used defensively. There might be a select handful of people that fall into the “this is the only gun I have” using “magnum” caliber rifles, but, it’s a very, very limited number. Most of those folks probably choose a shotgun if they can only afford 1 gun. Statistically speaking.

4 Likes

Depends on which “hunting rifle” and which shotgun (with which shell) you are comparing to.

A single shot break action 12 gauge shotgun with a hardwood stock firing a slug is going to far more perceived recoil than, say, a .30-30 lever action being used to take a deer. Even a pump 12 gauge with recoil pad and strong buck/slugs will outrecoil the -30

If however you compare a heavy, gas operated semi auto shotgun that’s well broken in firing target loads or reduced recoil buckshot vs, say, a lightweight minimalist 300 win mag…

3 Likes