Trap/Skeet/Sporting Clays

So I went to Active Shooter Training at my church, put on by the District Attorney’s Office.
One of the takeaways was that ushers who are CCW holders need training on moving targets.
That’s not going to happen outside of taking formal classes, as running and gunning isn’t provided for at many ranges outside of combat courses.

That got me thinking about shotgun sports. While not Hogan’s Alley, they do provide experience on moving targets, and while not handguns, they are after all, guns.
I’m thinking that shotgun sports may be helpful in augmenting my handgun practice in between less frequent opportunities to train on a pistol combat course and along with those laser gizmos.

Any thoughts?

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Interesting thought.

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Any IDPA or USPSA in your area. A google search might tell you.

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I’m not sure how well sporting clays would directly translate to defensive handgun use. Though it would likely at least help train the brain to better track moving targets. It would almost certainly help with tracking targets with a rifle. That’s why I purchased a shotgun last year for sporting clays, along with the fun factor of shooting clays.

Agree with @Robert1246 that finding a place that hosts competitive handgun shooting would be the best bet for inexpensive training. The one not far from my town has competitions a few times per month with very low entry fees. Though I suspect they don’t have moving targets very often.

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Does either program have competition stages involving a moving target?
I have seen stages with moving shooter at stationary targets, but not the other way around.
Of note, John Murphy of FPF Training does have a moving target shooting exercise in his training. It is challenging and fun.

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I shoot a lot of trap and sporting clays. Other than the 4 basic rules, i don’t see any cross over or applicability to shooting a pistol, and certainly not defensively.

I also shoot competitively (at least i try! :slight_smile: ) in IDPA. Depending on where you shoot, there are quite often stages with moving IDPA targets in addition to having to move to different firing positions. IDPA also will help you improve your slide lock and tactical reloads, as well as drawing from concealment, strong hand and weak hand shooting, etc.

I would lean more toward something like IDPA for practical training. Alternatively try and find a trainer or range that offers Force on Force training with simunitions (or even Airsoft)

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We have swinging targets that are activated by hitting another target. Targets that pop up when activated and show itself until a no shoot pops up. Spinning targets on a wheel about 5- 6” disks that have to be knocked off. Drop turns.

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Texas Star😎

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It would be bigger in Texas.

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It seems to me a running target may be a bad guy who has stopped being a threat. Think a bit and shoot carefully in that case.

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Determining whether attackers are running away or repositioning to continue an attack could be a challenge.

In the two attempted car jackings I have faced the criminals tried flanking me on two sides. Fortunately I saw them coming and was able to get out of there. But could easily see those situations having turned into a moving target situation.

Good point!
A soft target is selected because there won’t likely be armed resistance so why would an active shooter run?
I’ll have to ask the DA people the next time they visit us.

I think you mean is still a threat and running for cover. I know you are joking but it worries me.

I mean exactly what I said and am not joking. It is a tough decision to be made by anyone put in this position. Is he done shooting is the question. Is he running because he wants to get away? Is he going to grab a hostage? Or, like others suggest, is he running to get some cover? You have to decide when to pull that trigger, and you must be able to articulate to a jury why and what you have done. If you are convinced he is still a threat, then end the threat. If you aren’t sure then figure it out quickly. In a Free State like Texas ending the threat at any part of the incident and you are probably OK. Unfortunately, in the big cities in the rest of the country you may become the target of gun hating Soros DAs. Think through different scenarios in your church and try to plan what you might be facing and plan what your options and actions could be.

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Sorry, I thought you were implying to decide to shoot a bad guy who is no longer a threat. I guess it was the way you worded it that made me think that. I wouldn’t want anyone to think one can shoot a bad guy that is no longer a threat.

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Hi Robert, I was trying to point out the thin red line where the good guy with a gun takes a justifiable shot and that instant where it becomes a not defensible shot. Maybe keep him in your sights until he either leaves the building. or turns back to shoot?

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Thanks I appreciate your clarification.

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Another issue that needs discussion is this:
We won’t be having a Security Team.
That’s not in the cards, yet anyway.
We do have volunteers such as ushers who may have CCWs and therefore might have occasion to use deadly force to protect themselves and their families during an active shooter situation.
I can understand members of a security team being covered by appropriate insurance, but as a volunteer parishioner caught up in such a situation, would I be covered by USSA?

I think situational awareness and de-escalation techniques is something worth looking into. If you aren’t already.

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