Training

Looking at recent community opinions, I noticed something. Some have formed overtime their own ideas on how to protect themselves, storing weapons, when do I use it, carrying it, The list can go on. None mentioned training. The NRA, and the USCCA , have very good training and refresher courses, to keep our mind on the need for practice, updates on new or changed laws and to sharpen our skills in the proper use of our weapons. These help us to make the right decision ,if we are forced took defend against an attacker. Make a point to practice regularly.

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Amen brother!

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Don’t just look at the “Gun range” practice side of it either. Practice the mental awareness side all the time.

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I like GarandThumb, Reid Henrichs(Valor Ridge), and John Lovell (Warrior Poet Society) on youtube for training ideas, especially their low round count ideas as of late, and practice what I can. Getting older and stiffer (burpees became history a couple years ago, but at 62 it’s been a good run, and still climbing hills on my bicycle better than 22 years ago), but empty club weekdays allow me a little “flexibility” as it were. My son, living in “free state central” has been training with WPS , and I think I saw him in a Reid Henrichs video last night as well…
Anyways, just want to say, fitness is key in most things in life, so do your warmups, stretching and workouts, folks. Like I told my son, if something hurts, work something else. Feeling good, ribs won’t allow running, but not running allowed my knee to heal…hakuna matata :wink:
Edit to add…love my laser trainer (Itarget pro) for my John Wick moves in the privacy of my own house. Got the 9mm bullet which works in 7 guns for me, and got one for my son, and noticed he had targets set up at his house on the walls, so know he’s using it.Think I should get the 5.56 laser bullet so I can practice with the AR’s…
edit #2…ran today, slowly, but ribs healed good enough…3 steps 3 days ago knew I wasn’t ready, but gave it a shot today and got in 3.5 miles, with 115 pushups, 105 leg risers, 2 mile walk and finished up with the dumbbells. I always felt, should shtf, having the ability to maintain 5-6 mph for a few hours carrying 30-35 pounds could be crucial and is a fitness level I strive to maintain.

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@mattm >> thanks Matt good advice and, we should exercise and understand that if it’s time to hit the deck at least know what to expect and know what to do.

[ KUWA SALAMA ]
:us::us::us:

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Should we train for it, yes. That said, a kneeling position would be a better idea. From kneeling, you can still get up, and mobile quickly. You also, can still pivot 360 degrees if you need to.

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Good catch >> kneeling was not shown in the video <<<
:us::us::us:

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Kneeling- Uh, well, after knee replacement, kneeling is not an option. The Clint Eastwood movie Sudden Impact, He says several times, A mans gottah know his limitations! In the Marine Corps I learned adapt and overcome. So, there is squatting. Being able to maneuver quickly is key. Your location is relevant. Whatever gives you the advantage for survival is important.
Anyone ever train to escape and evade?

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@Todd30 >> *[quote=“Todd30, post:9, topic:74284, full:true”]
Kneeling- Uh, well, after knee replacement, kneeling is not an option. The Clint Eastwood movie Sudden Impact, He says several times, A mans gottah know his limitations! In the Marine Corps I learned adapt and overcome. So, there is squatting. Being able to maneuver quickly is key. Your location is relevant. Whatever gives you the advantage for survival is important.
Anyone ever train to escape and evade?
[/quote]

Sorry>>if anybody has hip trouble >> better call Jiffy <<

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This is some funny stuff brother @Blacky :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Interestingly I just realized how little practice I had done shooting a handgun while kneeling when a drill I was doing called for several shots from the kneeling position. I had to think about which knee should be forward. Having to think is not a good thing in an SD situation.

With a rifle, shooting from a kneeling or prone position are completely natural for me. I rarely shoot a rifle standing unless I am braced against a tree or some other object.

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And, the same basics of shooting a long gun kneeling can be applied to a hand gun.

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Yes probably feels identical for most folks. I am cross eye dominant though. I shoot pistols with my strong hand but rifles with my weak hand. So it feels better for me to have my weak knee up when shooting handguns for more natural eye alignment and my strong side knee up when shooting rifles.

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I’m cross dominant, and shoot hand guns and long guns strong hand side.

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Lets put this scenario to work. You are home in bed when the door bashes in and you can hear someone coming in. You kneel by the side of your dresser and stay away from the top! Or do you lay down besides your bed and shoot from the floor. These are the best positions for self-defense, it gives you advantage and concealment. If driving in your car and you have to defend yourself you will be sitting. If your in a restaurant and the place erupts,… you will be sitting.
So, between sitting kneeling and laying down your more likely to be in those positions and the Lord forbid you would ever just stand there like an old spaghetti western during a shoot out.

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Reading through this thread, I have to admit to maybe being envious of many of you. Ten years ago I was diagnosed with arthritis in my lower back, 1 level moderate, 2 levels moderate-to-severe, and 2 levels severe, as well as tri-compartment arthritis in both knees. 2 years ago, new x-rays for the pain management doc, he told me radiologist basically said OMG in the report. I am not getting on the ground, kneeling, or squatting, and I can’t run away. I train what I can with physical limitations (my son is 18 years ANG Security Forces/CATM, and helps with some training). My biggest thing is making certain to be aware of my surroundings, aware of what cover, or at least concealment, is available for me considering said limitations. It’s easy to talk about all these kinds of training, but please remember that many of us simply can not do some of these things.

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Interesting topic, but no where do I see legal training discussed. Proper aim and trigger pull is one thing, but knowing the law is quite different. So when and if I must draw I must understand the legal aspects of the situation. If I could escape the situation by a means other than using my gun, it would be in my best interest to do so. If I do not, then firing my weapon could be legally questioned.

I could be “legally” correct and found not guilty in the use of my weapon. However a civil law suit could be filed against me. I am told that the judge would refer to legal aspect and possibly toss the case out, but who knows if he will or not. At the bear minimum, the civil case adds the burden of my time and legal fees.

I have taken several legal courses that describe when is it proper to pull my gun. The best one had videos and we were asked to discuss the legal issues of the scenario.

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I believe every one who wishes to carry or own a firearm needs to get some kind of training, if new gun owner never owned or fired a hand gun or rifle should get the proper training and learn all the firearm safety rules.

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Dry fire training can actually be fun. Laser dit apps are a great way to improve accuracy. You can use your EDC (keeping ALL live ammo in another room), and set up targets. The app registers the hits so you can see how you’re doing. Another big plus, is you get used to your guns trigger. That’s another big advantage to doing dry fire. And when you DO get to the range…Be prepared for an improvement !!!

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