How important to have hand-to-hand skills?

My opinion is based on my life experiences.
I grew up in the South Pacific and now living in Massachusetts for 20years.
Back Ground:
As a child, I grew up in the old ways. My old man was military pretty strict. Living on an Island, learning hand-to-hand combat skills is part of growing up. Judo was my choice. It was a more defensive skill, plus I like to toss much larger folks around. At the time, I did not understand the difference between defense skills, defense+offence, or countering.

Why are we not amplifying our firearms training by including hand-to-hand skills? My thought is if you are comfortable enough to pull the trigger. Maybe you are comfortable using your hands.

I have only had to use my Judo skills once while carrying my firearm. I did need to pull my firearm out because I had options. To me, training with a firearm without training in hand skills makes us one-dimensional.
I hope I am making sense.

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Everything that you wrote makes perfect sense to me.

Stay safe.

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Yes, self-defense definitely includes being able to use other methods, as best as one can. I personally believe in situational awareness as the primary method to avoid bad situations. If one still finds oneself in a bad situation, hopefully, it will not rise to a lethal force encounter, that is essentially a “no win” scenario, even if one survives the encounter, there is the aftermath that one never wants to experience.

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Yes, you are making sense. If all you have is a hammer, everything is a nail. The same is true with firearms and self defense. If your only tool is a firearm, you limit you ability to defend yourself. I’m not saying everyone should load up like a cop’s duty belt, but hand to hand defense can be used without any other tools on your belt. It is often not practical on our daily lives to carry pepper, a baton, a taser and a firearm. But your hands should be with you wherever you are.

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:smiling_face_with_three_hearts::star_struck::star_struck:-- preaching the truth.

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Disparity of force. This is part of the why we carry a firearm. Plus, my montra, “A man has got to know his limitations”. Not everyone has the physical capacity to defend themselves this way.

I have nothing against hand to hand self defense, but as mentioned if your situational awareness skills didn’t allow you to maintain distance you failed.

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I agree to a certain point. If you try to walk away and the threat closes the distance in that microsecond, you need to decide. Situational awareness helps make judgment calls, in my opinion. Having options gives you more tools

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Unfortunately, there are times or places where there is no way to leave an adequate reactionary gap and there is not always a disparity of force where deadly force would be excessive.

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A carpenter does not just have to use a hammer for work. A chef does not just use a spatula, a mechanic does not just use a nine MM wrench because he usually cannot find it anyways! Why would anyone think that only one skill or tool is all they need? Knowledge is Wisdom and USCCA teaches the skills needed to protect yourself. Situational awareness, escape, evade and by avoiding having to use any other skills than you are successful. Using any hand-to-hand skills, if you are required to have to use is a good option.

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Agreed, in fact at one point I asked the guys at the gym I train at, “do you guys practice with guns as part of your martial arts/self defense training?” Surprisingly very few thought they needed to have a gun because they are Black Belts, Cage Fighters, trained martial artists. The Krav guys I deal with are gun friendly the MMA guys, not so much.

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Happy Anniversary @Fizbin and thanks for the input you bring to this family. :+1: :+1:

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It is important and I agree 100 percent. The thing is that as you get older those skills can diminish as you also get weaker. I did some boxing as a sport growing up. I can still box but there is no longer things called fair fights. If you can get some type of training in hand to hand it would not hurt, it can only help you.

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You should have SOME hand-to-hand skills and techniques to function in this ugly material world - keep them simple, direct, and target soft, vital points of the body. Don’t get fancy - eyes, neck, ears, etc… A hook or kick to the groin is a low-percentage technique, while a strike to the abdomen - especially the bladder - can be devastating, and double-up your attacker. Save your fingers and knuckles - use palm or hammer-fist strikes to the face, for example. Ordinary items like keys, pens, and combs can be improvised weapons, if you have to go that far. FYI

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I believe the hand to hand skills are very important. I can imagine many scenarios where a firearm is not warranted or where a person would have to use physical force to gain enough space to deploy their firearm.

I have read about, been shown and practiced a few moves. But I really do need to get a lot more in depth training. As soon as I finish my cardiac physical therapy I am going to try and get involved in a local krav maga class. Something I have wanted to do for the past several years but just never made the time for. Seems like a good way to start gaining back all the muscle I lost after the heart attack.

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Hand-to-hand is the original “less lethal” option and and could buy time if the transition to lethal means becomes necessary.

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Amen to that!

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Martial arts are up designed for close up work. Firearms are designed for distance work. “Close up” and “distance” can overlap depending on the situation.

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You have to have some kind of combative skills (ie: hand-to-hand). If you don’t, all you are is a holster for whoever comes across your body.

Personally, I’ve been doing Krav Maga for a while now. I looked at the different martial arts out there, and decided to go this route. You’re not going to use Tae-Kwon-Do in a street fight, same with Kung Fu. Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is a lot of grappling, and you’re not going to win a fight on your back. This made the most sense to me as it is designed for street fights.

I wrote an article on it on my website a while back: Self Defense – My Krav Maga Journey – We the People Firearms Academy

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Agreed, with this exception. Some of the stand up art DO teach one how to defend against punches and kicks. Krav, or at least the stuff I’ve worked on for the last few years, is an offensive art, close, close close. But to your point, and I think we’ve agreed on this before, Krav is simple, viscous, and effective. Practical to learn for the person that doesn’t want to spend a lot of time in a gym.

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In my opinion, Judo is a skill I think everyone should try. Judo, you don’t need to know how to throw a punch or kick. Suppose a threat grabs you or is close enough for you to grab the threat. Learning a few Judo forms, and you are good. Using a person’s body weight against them is how I have always trained. As I get older and slower, I feel this technique is good as I become an old man.

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