Should I call the police?

I got a call recently from a Responsibly Armed American with this question. Should I call the police. Here are some details from this encounter.

BF was walking with his GF on the street about 9pm in the Louisville area when a large dog came rushing at them. The dog was approaching barking and did not appear to have a friendly demeanor. BF draws his weapon but does not fire. The dog turns around and goes running back to the house it came from. As the dog is going home, BF holsters his firearm about the same time a man comes out of the garage calling the dog back. It is likely the man was calling the dog before he came into sight making the dog turn away. Sunset in Louisville on Sunday was approximately 8:35 pm so it would have been dark at 9:00 pm.
The firearm was never discharged and was not pointed at anything other than the approaching dog. It is unknown whether the dog’s owner saw or even could have seen the firearm at any time during this encounter.

Should he call the police?

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If yes, only to say there is/was an aggressive non leashed animal that when retreated upon being called was in that house over there…

Otherwise, I’d say no.

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Well you can just to cover yourself because you don’t know who could’ve been watching and accuse you of brandishing a weapon. You can always inform the police what had happened, they would probably say no harm no foul.

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I would say no. The dog went back when called and nobody was hurt. Unless this is a known pattern of behavior with the owner and the dog, I would let it go.

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In open carry state I wouldn’t call the Police in this situation.

@MikeBKY… hopefully you will tell us the proper answer soon… :thinking: :slightly_smiling_face:

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My answer is yes the police should be called and notified as with any scenario where one is forced to draw a firearm. It is possible a neighbor or passerby could have witnessed this action and it would be best to be on the front end and provide full transparency to the police vs being reported for brandishing, menacing, or anything else.

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I’m with @ScottH on this one. If my firearm leaves my holster outside for any sort of self-defense situation, I’m calling the police – whether I fired a round or not. Is it going to be more paperwork, yes. Will it help protect me? Probably. Be the first to call the police.

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Thats a tough one - I would say no, Common sense: Nothing happen regarding the incident - owner’s dog initiated the response, even though the reaction of the Dog owner may be WTF- it still was initiated by the Dog’s owner - the question to ponder is what would the result be if the police was called - If BF has a CC and drew is weapon to protect himself he acted properly - or rather I think I would have reacted the same way-also Provided that the dog could have reached him or his GF No Property fence to prevent the dog from completing the attack - my opinion

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Absolutely yes. BF drew a deadly weapon with the intent to use it for legal defensive action. Call and notify Attorney, LEO, and USCCA (if covered).

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I have to say no on this one. I walk everyday before I go to work and although I carry my firearm, it will only be used in case of coyotes. I also carry a tazer just for things like this and it has happened before and popping the tazer off has scared the dog away everytime. Its gonna happen at some point if you like walking. I just do not see the point of getting law enforcement involved if nothing happened.

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I believe it was you @MikeBKY that said a person should usually not talk to police, unless you’re the victim, and then be very careful what you say.

I’ve watch enough cop shows to recognize that this feels true; they are always looking for the perp, so just don’t be on their radar if you can help it.

Unless I felt the need to report the dog as a problem, not reporting a draw in the dark is not a crime, especially if it was defendable and warranted.

I do carry a large can of Bear Spray when I walk for exercise though, for just such an event.

Fact is, I live in a very safe and civilized area, and I’m much more likely to need spray against a bad dog, than a firearm against anything. That said, I usually carry both when walking.

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If you call Police in THIS situation, you act as the victim.

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No crime was committed. So I’d stay off the radar.

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I assume you’ll eventually tell us the correct answer, @MikeBKY. I’m generally inclined to not call, but I’m on pretty good terms with my local PD and I don’t think I’d have an issue. I think USCCA recommends that you report any time you have to un-holster your weapon, so that’s probably the best answer. Also, while this is in Louisville, it seems like the answer could vary depending on your state and local laws, and perhaps your local LE and judges.

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FOR-SURE!!!

I know what many of you might be thinking…
No harm-no fowl but all it takes is one nosy neighbor in the shadows puffing a ciggerate too see you and before you know it the whole task force is rolling up on you guns blazing.

Personally, would not like to eat dirt today and catch a felony.

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I’d say yes, for 2 reasons. 1. unleashed animal 2. he drew his weapon.
If anyone witnessed that and calls 911, I know in some localities that is no bueno.

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I’m not so sure I wouldn’t anyway after telling them I drew (brandished) a weapon at a dog in the dark that didn’t bite me.

Reasonable cops and jurisdictions would react reasonably in this situation. But not all are… California for example in SF or LA county.

I’m staying silent.

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No! Don’t create a problem where there isn’t one. :roll_eyes:

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Slightly off topic, this is the reason I got my CCL over a decade ago!

I used to drive out to the country (before I moved to the country) to photography landscapes and nature. Once I was in the middle of the road with a tripod, I looked back behind me, about 50 yards away, there were 2 mean ass looking dogs just growling and staring at me,!

I went the next week to classes and got the CCL.

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There are variables that would determine the answer to the question if it was me, such as the presence of passing cars, nosey neighbors peeking out of windows, or bystanders who witnessed the events; a quick look around would tell the story. If there were no potential pitfalls to my choice, I would probably walk on without calling in an ‘almost incident.’ However, I would feel compelled to return to the dog’s home in the light of the next day to make his owner aware of the near miss with his pet. The reasons for my choice are fairly simple - I’d rather try to handle neighborhood relations myself rather than calling the cops to handle it for me, and give neighbors a chance to do what’s right before involving LE. If the man is a responsible, reasonable pet owner, he’ll make sure the dog isn’t problem in the future, and if he isn’t, then a call to local police is next on my list of actions to take. It’s possible my choice may lead directly to jail, and I see the reasons for calling it in are valid preventative measures, but it seems like a lot of people (not ya’ll) use LE as option one to deal with anything that comes up rather than making an effort themselves, when possible. We are, after all, our own first responders.

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