Responsible Gun Owners

The USCCA has many articles and most have the words “RESPONSIBLE GUN OWNERS” . How many of you stop and Think what that means? For me there are several items which I believe we all should follow.
1 Be Legal and know when a weapon can be legally used.
2 Be trained , Not “I passed the CC class three years ago so I am Good”. Not My friend took me out and I
shot his gun last year, “I have a different type of gun but there all the same”. It is not like driving, Know
how do arms maintenance, know different ammo, and train with what you carry. And listen to
knowledgeable trainers on not only pulling the trigger but How to aim,reload and clear a jam.
3 Practice Practice Safely(unloaded) how to draw and holster your weapon, Watch some “you tube” of
people Looking down the barrel , firing with the wrong grip and handling drawing or holstering a gun
with their finger on the trigger. Learn how to holster without anything catching the trigger
4 Do Not Only read these listed items and devote time learning to use what might save your and your
loved ones life
5 Learn how to discuss ( not argue ) with Anti- 2a people the rational and common sense reasons to
carry and elect Pro - 2a politicians
Please comment Pro or Con or add anything I may have missed or what you may feel is inaccurate.

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Sorry, no responsible gun owners here!
I have to say, though, half of us ( at least on this forum ) were or still are some form of law enforcement or military!
I’m pretty sure 98% of us didn’t learn our skills from Xbox or television!
99% of us own a few firearms and practice on a daily basis.

On a personal note, I’ve had a sidearm in my hands since 1977, and like a doctor, this is my practice. I’ve never stopped learning or teaching

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Some good points but what’s the difference? As long as there is dialogue I am thankful. I think people let their egos get in the way.

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As it says… responsible.
I agree with first 4 points.
Discussing or arguing it’s not a part of it. I know a lot of responsible people who own the firearms who do not talk about 2A. They just exercise their rights and do this responsibly.

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Couldn’t help but bring this up. Of the six people that were not so much “anti” but unsure about our rights as AMERICANS, I had many discussions about why I carry. Most of the time the conversation started with why I like to sit in a certain location when dining out.

Well, in today’s society ( meaning the past 15 years ) there are more bad guys than cops! Most of the discussion revolves around survival, through the meal, on the way to the car, picking up last minute groceries, going to a movie, shopping at a mall, picking up the mail, in other words, sh#t doesn’t happen on a schedule! Be aware of your surroundings, your head out of the phone and expect the unexpected! The second half of the conversation is safety! After a few days, in some cases weeks, on the range for acclamation to the life style, they couldn’t wait to purchase their own! The six, all have become every day protectors of their families. A couple whom I’ve recommended to USCCA. You can lead a horse to water…

The third half of the conversation is our God given rights to protect ourselves and other human beings! You know the thing…it’s important to know that I expressly teach the protection of humans, not cars, not TV’s, not wallets or credit cards! In some cases, depending upon the level of communism in a particular state, I do bring up the protection of the castle and all of its occupants!

Discussing firearms ownership should be a very personal matter.
In the same manner you might discuss religion, taxes or sex!

If you have any other questions, you’re in the right place. Keep your head up and watch your six. Our world our country has changed!
As far as responsibility, that’s as personal as it gets!

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I can’t argue any of those points. Very well said :clap: :+1:

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All excellent points. I might add: Be trained in de-escalation techniques / non-lethal strategies (what works and what does not work) and know when and how to use them, and when not to use them. I personally could use a lot more training in these. I am a senior, so I will not be doing any ‘Chuck Norris’ moves, but there are still things I could learn which are still effective.

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Yea it is a bitch getting old and if well past 70 you reach where the mind says go and the body says No

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I’m 68 & in good health but I’m pretty busted up. Lots of arthritis too. I try to get to the range at least twice a month & do quite a bit of dry fire. Getting old ain’t for sissies

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Well said, I think more people need to be trained in “conflict resolution”.

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Humility, and continual learning.

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I did not even try to cover that area or being aware of your situation and staying out of trouble areas. USCCA has published some good articles and hopefully as a person trains those topics become covered.
Thank you for the comment

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We can only hope Thank you

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Interesting also in that, any one legal owner can make a mistake, and that one error can reflect on the greater responsible community.

I know I’m preaching to the choir, but “good judgment, being rationale, not acting as though one can act like a police officer”, just because.

As someone else pointed out, not putting oneself if a predicament of “use”, but avoiding conflict. It calls for mature thinking.

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Good point. Avoid conflict at all cost. Once it has started it can only be stopped not ignored. If we can’t stop it than the police. I hope response time is quick:sunglasses:
De-escalation is key.

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I was lucky to have been raised in South Texas on 120 acres. I can’t remember a time when thete wasn’t a gun in sight. I got my 1st 22 rifle when I was 11 years old. My father was mister gun safety. I actually went to “gun camp” for two weeks when I was 12. I got my 1st deer rifle when I was 13. A Remington 243. My father was not an abusive man but if he saw me do ANYTHING unsafe witha firearm he would slap some skin. I enlisted into the Navy at 17 in 1974. I was in bootcamp 3 weeks after graduating high school. We had some basic handun training with the Colts. It really wasn’t until I was on a shore duty rotation that I was assigned to Base Security & had to go through some fairly insightful classes about the use of deadly force, when I was allowed to unholster my firearm (S&W 38) etc… I became more interested in handguns at that point (1981). I’ve been a handgun enthusiast since then. I was also on a Regional Navy pistol team for a few years (1911s) which gave us unlimited range access & free ammo ( only for use on the range). I’m 68 years old & still learn new things about handguns everyday. You never “know it all” & the best way to screw up is to become complacent with safe practices. None if this long text addresses what being a responsible gun owner means. My point is that being around & using firearms for over 50 years does NOT make me a responsible gun owner. Only dedication to training, learning my state’s gun laws & reading everything I can about how to be a responsible gun owner can lead to the goal of being “responsible”

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Thank you for the comment and information, I hope people understand the importance of continued training and reading your story should help.

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Thank you for your comments, the more people understand how complex a bad situation is the more they will be aware that carrying a firearm does not mean you have to always use it.

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The more we learn the safer we will be. Thank you for your comments

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Man, ain’t that the truth. One day you’re out being a man doing manly things and the next you’re on a bed in the ER with tubes coming out from every hole plus some they made in you.

If this rain stops, I’m putting up a target and punching holes in it.

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