Physical training for self-defense?

Do you work out? Take martial arts classes?

How do you physically prepare your body for a possible self-defense incident?

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Running, soccer, swimming pool and sauna. :slightly_smiling_face:
And of course grip strengtheners… I use them all the time even driving the car.

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Run!

I’ve seen what happens to people who work out to death. :slight_smile:

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Swimming and flex, sometimes some Escrima edged, stick, and hand. Mostly flexibility in the therapy pool and right now laser shooting.

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What I do is I keep myself full at all times. So when somebody attacks me and hits me in the gut I puke all over them.:face_vomiting:

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I think this topic came up once, last year. And though I encourage physical fitness and self-defense training, I hope no one hear thinks they can take a half hour karate lesson and beat up ninjas like the movies consistently show. Most entry to mid-level martial arts are just enough to get your face beaten in a bar fight.

Colt made us equal. You don’t need to unlock the dragon, anymore.

Consider that Bruce Lee- the martial arts star who pushed physical fitness and martial arts to the human limit- still taught his students to poke their opponents in the eye and run away.

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Let me show you my routine.

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I found that working out should not be good for you. I break out with sweats, hard breathing, and causes pain!
Just kidding! cheez! Nothing better than running a quarter mile than shooting at a target. Then go run another quarter mile and shoot again and continue this till you have ran three miles. Than you can see how well your shooting has improved.:slightly_smiling_face:

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So many civilians (including LEOs) do almost nothing that any functional fitness plan that incorporates cardiovascular conditioning, some resistance training, grip strength training, and agility training puts a person light years ahead of the pack. But I have clearly observed a distinct advantage shared by contact sports athletes over the course of my 4+ decades of self-defense and martial (military) skills training and teaching. I don’t care if it is a combat sport, basketball, football, rugby, hockey, etc. That seems to make no difference in a fight. But the toughness and athletic intelligence that come from years of competing against an actively resisting opponent (s) is a big leg up! Then, when we begin talking about small unit tactical stuff, having a background in team contact sports is helpful.

Personally, (in my mid-50s) I split my time between moderate to vigorous cardio, light free weights and resistance bands and grip trainers, and martial arts and shooting sports specific agility training. I also shoot on a comp shooting team for old farts like me.

When I say agility, I mean something different than most people think of when they see/hear the word. I mean balance, quickness, complex motor skills, and fine motor skills training from eye exercises and hand-eye coordination all the way to martial arts, dance, golf. Pick your poison thoughtfully.

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Walking, bicycling, and swimming. Might be adding kayaking to that in the near future. If you see me running, you better run too.

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I was an avid distance runner and world class trail running and orienteering competitor into my 30s. Eventually the knees, hips, and ankles had simply had enough of that kind of constant pounding. After having a great ortho surgeon scope out my knees, I now cycle, walk, and hike a lot…per his advice. I still run 100-120 meter intervals now and then. The blocks in my neighborhood are in that range E-W. So I will run one at a 75% pace and then walk 2 while snaking through the neighborhood for a few miles. But, generally speaking, I am totally with you!

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The Starting Strength program - nature favors strength.

I ran track, and cross country in my younger years. Now, mild arthritis and 21 years of a manual labor job, have affected my knees. I can run if I need to. But not 1000 FPS.

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I’m in my early 40’s now. I played football in high school but that was a long time ago. I’ve been into strength and conditioning for many years now, so much that I got a MS degree in the subject matter. I’m also a big advocate of Yoga because no matter how strong you are, if you can’t move or can’t move without pain then you’re not going to do well in a tactical situation.

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I’m north of 50 years old. If I get in bad breath range, I’m going to be at a disadvantage, regardless of my fitness level. That being said, I do light cross-training 3-4 times a week, walk every night, and try to squeeze in yoga whenever possible. I’m hoping 50 years of experience will fill in the blanks my fitness won’t!

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@todd30, great idea! Analogous to what my high school basketball coach used to teach us. When we would shoot free throws at the end of practice, he would make us run suicides before shooting. His logic mirrored yours: When you’re on the line, it will be in the middle of a game when you’re tired and sweaty. Train in the conditions you’ll experience.

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I agree. Sometimes I wish that I lived on a lot of land so I could shoot. If I did I’d have a training shed next to my range and the last exercise of a circuit would involve shooting at a target.

Garmin watch. 12,000+ steps a day. 3 mile fast walk daily.
Lifting and moving lots of heavy stuff all day.
Lots of chainsaw with a heavy Stihl 271.
Dream of playing soccer again. Retired from rec 5 years ago at 52, and had played starting at the age of 4.

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Just carry that Stihl around. No one is going to mug you.

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