New Shooters: What gun should I buy?

No arguments here. The PPQ felt like it was made to fit into my hand. That said, I knew about Walther even as a kid because 007 carried the PPK and Megatron turned into a P-38. As a result, Walther wasn’t my first choice because I didn’t want people to laugh because I bought the James Bond gun (the PPQ was developed from the P99 which was also used by Bond). After trying the PPQ, I changed my mind and haven’t regretted it.

3 Likes

I recommend renting at a range and trying out what you think you want before you buy it. I had my mind set on a Springfield Hellcat at one point. I went to the range and rented one. I ended up renting a few others that day, as well. There was something about the Hellcat I just couldn’t stand; I don’t know exactly what it was. I fired a Walther PPS and a Sig P365 that day, as well, and the Sig was perfect for me. Off topic, I agree the statements made regarding Walther being a great choice, the PPQ is amazing.

5 Likes

I carry my Kimber Micro 9 the most, and it may be a great starter gun. Get the 8 rd extended mags if you need more pasture land on the grips. My Buffalo hands do. And as I’ve mentioned elsewhere these mags interchange with Sig Sauer P 938 which may also be a good starter piece. I have the Equinox version of the P 938, and this one and the Kimber are both great looking models.
The gun you buy should fit your budget, your hand, and your ability to handle it properly.
After training with your first gun, you may decide you want to trade into something different. You’ll be more knowledgeable and experienced about what will work better for you.
Even if your budget is limited, do some research before grabbing a $150 gun. After having your FFL show you some options and get you to grip a few models correctly, you may find that a somewhat more expensive one is more desirable for you. You may want to think lay-away if the cash isn’t quite handy enough.
In my opinion, only if you have an experienced shooter with respectable knowlege should you take a chance on a used gun that you can’t strip and understand the condition of the parts.
One of the best shooters I have owned (still do)
is considered an unpopular brand by some. I paid $238 used, and the internals are in great shape. So if you have a smart, humble friend, go together new and used gun shopping.
Hit every small mom and pop gun shop and pawn shop as well as the shiny big stores.
Long winded, yes I was. Too many have made mistakes on either cheap or expensive guns that were not good matches. Many of these folks have tossed the mistakes in the cabinet, locked away gathering dust. If you buy something that doesn’t seem to work for you, take it to a shop and trade it on something else.
Keep researching and looking until you finally come upon that happy happy treasure that just fits.

3 Likes

Start learning safety and fundamentals of shooting with smaller caliber handguns with a instructor if you can. If you have an immediate need for a self defense firearm, get help from a qualified instructor. Learn to walk before you run. :us::us:

3 Likes

Getting back to the OP’s title:

Answer: everyone you can afford.

4 Likes

Saving enough to buy ammo, of course.

3 Likes

:rofl:

^^^ Good points!

:woman_facepalming:

5 Likes

“Well, son, after you buy this one you’re going to want another, so might as well save yourself some time, and get more than one at a time.”

-my dad

6 Likes

Work out a budget so that after you have purchased each month’s budget for multiple guns, you’ll have enough left out of your paycheck to buy minimal groceries.

5 Likes

Ramen and water🤣

4 Likes

I was just going to say, that’s why the awesome guns get weaker nicknames and the lesser guns get more macho names. Here’s my Hi-Point, “Beefsteak,” and my .50 Beowulf®, “Rice & Beans.” :wink:

2 Likes

Highpoint “beefsteak”?? We don’t need to budget for those…They’re like $10… (I did adopt a highpoint a long time ago)

2 Likes

Ever read Beowulf? Stronger than a beefsteak.

1 Like

I guess I was unclear in what I intended… It’s how much money is left over for buying food that gives them their nicknames. :man_facepalming:

3 Likes

This. Or find a gun club and ask for help. Most gun owners I know are more than happy to let someone else try their firearm, as long as you aren’t burning a whole box of their ammo.

I’m not going to say I’ve never given someone advice, based on what I know about that person. But someone who has never owned a personal firearm needs to find out what their options are. Someone who has never driven a car would be foolish to run out and buy the first auto that caught their eye. Same thing. Find out what you like and then you’ll know what to look for. And ignore the “Ford/Chevy” debates that you see on gun forums.

4 Likes

@Alces_Americanus You got that right too.
That’s a fun idea to consider.
My Springfield is an Equinox. Who would be afraid of the equinox? Why fear a MICRO 9?
45 GAP sounds like it’s missing something lol.

3 Likes

Sig has an “Equinox” P226, but if that’s too balance-of-light-dark for you, there’s also a P226 “Nightmare.”

2 Likes

You’re getting me so confused!

2 Likes

And I thought High Point was named after the lovely NC town.

2 Likes

The best advice I’ve seen has been the posts urging new gun buyers to go to ranges that rent handguns and can coach the shooter.

3 Likes