New Shooter Monday: Point to Shoot?

I recently worked with a student who was cross-eye dominant and could shoot great with one eye closed and turning her head slightly to line up her sights. But when we worked on unsighted fire she was consistent to the left of where she was aiming.

We cover unsighted fire in our Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals classes using examples like pointing our finger as a toddler and aiming a Nerf gun as a child (or adult child :innocent:).

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(From Concealed Carry and Home Defense Fundamentals Page 137)

Going over those examples, I encouraged her to trust what her body is telling her about where her fingers are aimed when she’s at extension and shooting. Her entire next magazine was grouped within 3"" of the spot I asked her to hit. She was defensively accurate and thrilled with how effective (and easy) the change was.

When you train, do you spend more time on sighted fire or unsighted fire?

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My grandfather was in the Army Air Corps, and told me that they were always taught the point method for their .45s. They didn’t spend a lot of time aiming. I get the impression that back then, they figured if the enlisted at the air field had to use their weapons, something had already gone horribly wrong.

I’ve known just a handful of shooters that were comfortable and accurate with this method. Scary good, though.

Maybe I’d be better if I practiced more. I’ll admit I spend most of my time on sighted target practice. I try to time box it so I don’t take all day aiming for every shot, but I probably spend more time than I should if I’m practicing for self-defense.

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Normally I train myself not to focus on the sights, I put the target at self defense range 7 yards down range and point and shoot with both eyes opened. I have been getting more accurate. The M&P series pistols have a natural point of aim that’s why I trained myself to shoot like that. I can shoot the same with my Glock 43. Both guns have decent triggers so it’s pretty easy to be accurate. When I take new shooters out I teach them proper grip, sight focus and target acquisition. I explain the 4 basic safety rules and teach them how to operate the firearm while unloaded. Also comfortable stance is important.

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I’ve only just coming up on a year from when I first started shooting. So for me, accuracy is still my primary goal. That said, the same methodology I’m learning to quickly sight in on my target helps with pointing to shoot.

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Point shooting. I only aim for long, precision shots, and to make sure the sights are properly aligned.

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When I train others I get their confidence up with aimed firing before I get into point shooting. I like to practice point shooting because it exaggerates everything I am doing wrong and if you pay attention, your natural point of aim. I have been point shooting since 1983. Scary good, if I don’t say myself.

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tricky question… :smirk:

One of the fundamentals I’ve been taught and I teach others is to press out the firearm to line up the sights with line between your eyes and the target.
Is it point shooting? Yes, no, maybe? Or it is still sight shooting?

The point is, once you find your natural position and learn how to line everything up then you can easily decide - do I need to see my sights, or do I have enough time to see my sights and take very precise shot?
The difference is how you focus your eyes. If you focus on the target - it’s point shooting, when you focus on front sight - it’s sight shooting. But your body posture and firearm position remain the same.

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I shoot with both eyes open, at 20 feet or so it’s mostly see the target & shoot. Due to practice my firearm comes up flat & makes a little difference to center mass.

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The bottom line, whether sighted or point shooting, is you better be darn sure that bullet goes where you intended it to go. Things usually go sideways under life-or-death induced stress and if your first shot isn’t spot on your goose will be thoroughly cooked.

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Part one of two:

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Very good article. The slight glimpse at the front sight at the start of my trigger pull is what I have been striving for. I find this increases my accuracy over completely unsighted point shooting while slowing me down just a hair if at all.

Focusing on the hands of the threat prior to acting is something I need to figure out how to incorporate into my training. Simunitions/scenario training seems like a great but likely expensive option.

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Thanks for all your comments and suggestions! This discussion has been very insightful!:+1:
I’m feeling like a guitarist who wandered into a music store for inspiration, only to encounter everyone from Hendrix to Van Halen!

As a CRSO and instructor, I’ve found myself often “chanting the mantra” of “where’s my finger”. This has been especially helpful for newer shooters whether point or full aimed shooting… for what it’s worth. :wink:

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Very good article. My father who was 20 years USAF. HE told me when I was young to point at what you are aiming at and you will hit your target. I did this deer hunting and dropped my deer at at least a hundred yards with a rifle.

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Welcome to the family brother @Byron23 and you are in the right place at the right time.

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Blind coordination with ( Flagged ) firearm. Interesting to see position of firearm
Brought into fire position with eyes closed. Can be useful practice for low light conditions and posture memory. Also practice @ close range shooting from
Belt or hip level for close defense to include practice in prone position back or side. A little off track but does have to do with pointing.
Thanks : NIHONGO MASTER
PS: ANATA WA HANASEMASU KA ??? :shinto_shrine:

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I train on both. Depending on the distance the pointed method can be a lot quicker. Don’t believe me, watch Gun Smoke. Works every time. HaHa. All joking aside. I am an ex-fast draw champion from Texas. I do not care how fast you draw and point your weapon. If the weapon is not on target being fast will not help you. We all know that the objective is to get you weapon on target as safely as you can. Remember their could be innocent people in the area. If you do not practice the pointing technique, unless if is a very short distance do not try to use it in a gun fight.

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Indeed, the purpose of point shooting is not for distance shooting. At close distance to the target when the ground that the target can cover to get to you is close to you. I was told when learning about this in 1984, that it is called reaction shooting. A self-defense shooting technique for close combative shooting.
After being confident in your shooting abilities a person could get training then start practicing this technique.
Thamks for your input!

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:scream: why ? Please use original writing… so everyone can understand… :wink:

あなたは日本語を話せますか

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Jerzy


you really should change your name to Poindexter. Good investigation.
KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK.

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I’m a hardworker @Blacky :wink:
:metal:

BTW… did you know that “Poindexter” is very insulting according to Urban Dictionary? :joy: :wink: :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:
Thx God I don’t care… :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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