New out of the box service

Agree with @William377 regarding the ammo and also could be the spring. I would lightly oil the running rails for the slide after a good cleaning.

Great advice! I always strip and clean a new gun. It helps keep the frustration down and even damaging it on the off chance there is an obstruction somewhere.

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As a local range RSO I counsel all our shooters to field strip their new firearms before they arrive at the range. It helps them to (1) ensure that the guns are suitably lubricated and; (2) it provides the new owner with an opportunity to gain familiarity with the firearm. If I am there I do the field strip for them, in front of them, to show them the process.

No one should ever use a firearm straight out of the box, without these simple procedures.

Only truly novice shooters are unaware of this, one of the most basic rules of firearm ownership.

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Great advice.

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I own four firearms from three different companies. Not many compared to some of you out there.
The manufacturers instructions that came with each firearm states to clean the firearm before the first use. Obviously good advice.

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Thomas504, I’ve looked at a hand full of the direction books that came with some of our firearms and all I saw was “Ready to shoot right out of the box.”
Maybe I just don’t have that manufacturers firearm, (Yet). Very good advice from manufacturer.

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I’ve had at least 9-12 different guns from friends or neighbors who ask me to “Fix my new Gun”. Complaints range from failures to feed/eject, vertical stringing & assorted other minor things. On all but one occasion the firearm just needed a extremely good cleaning & proper lubrication. If I can I try to go to the range w/them to make sure they are being safe. Too many new shooters go out on their own… a very poor decision!

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Welcome to the family brother @Jeffrey243 and God bless you.

Hello and welcome @Jeffrey243

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A few years ago, my wife experienced a similar issue with her PK380. I had noted to myself during my pre-range cleaning/inspection that the feed ramp looked a little rough. So when misfeeds started at the range, I immediately suspected the feed ramp. That night after cleaning, I sat and polished the feed ramp for her, by hand, until it shined like a mirror. It took quite the while, but it solved the problem. Never another misfeed with that firearm. Some manufacturers ship with a fully polished feed ramp, others not so much. It can even vary by model from the same manufacturer.

Ironically, my wife hasn’t touched that firearm in years, not since she picked up a Sig P238.

I agree with the original poster here; I always clean and lube a new firearm before taking it to the range. Some need it worse than others, but it’s worth the time. It also ensures you have some basic knowledge of your firearm, and gives you the confidence that you can at least field strip it if the need should occur during your first outing together.

Don’t laugh, but I always review the owners manual before I disassemble a new firearm. There can be subtle differences between makes and models, so I like to make sure I’m aware of them before I encounter them. (Usually, I do this even before I buy a new firearm by downloading a copy from the manufacturer’s website.)

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I’m laughing with you. I have a Baretta PX4 Storm in 40 S&W that doesn’t see much range time. Every year or so I disassemble and clean whether it needs it or not. I have to watch a YouTube video to figure it out almost every time :rofl:

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Ty I have tried cleaning the feed ramp that did not work

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Sometimes cleaning is not enough.
Feed ramp works best when polished to “looks like mirror” state.

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That is what I meant to say, I have taken apart and polished the hell out of it twice now, I was thinking maybe the spring I’m going to try a hotter load before I change spring but I don’t think it’s the ramp

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Since we are talking about polishing feed ramp(s) maybe we should discuss how we do it. I just polished one of mine this morning, two actually because there is one in the frame and another at the entrance to the barrel chamber on a 1911.

I would say the most important part is to not get so aggressive that the original shape nor angle is changed. I started by wet sanding with 2,000 grit sandpaper and using my cell phone camera to zoom in and inspect. The next level of polishing for me is 0000 steel wool. Again I inspect very frequently to ensure I am not reshaping in any way. The last step is car finish polishing compound. I put the polishing compound on a cloth dremel tool attachment and polish away. It is a bit messy but does a nice job.

I used to work the process over and over till it looked perfect under magnification, but I just work it now till it looks like a mirror to the naked eye and feels smooth to the touch.

Feed ramp before polishing:

Feed ramp after:

I will shoot it like this for a while and leave it alone if no feed issues

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I will take mine apart I will try to get some pics of it or better yet I will try a short video

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Good job @Gary_H , but you still do not have mirror. However if this works - nothing more needed.

Steel wool always leaves marks. You can try finish it with Flitz paste, you will be amazed with result.
My barrels with this state :point_down: never failed me.

A 2021-09-18 10-53-08

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Willam377,

That is outstanding advice. That is the first this I do with a new firearm, it is also my way of becoming familiar with it right away. A few years ago I went shooting with a friend who had been in the Marine Corp. He was much older than me so I fully expected to learn quite a bit. He brought out his Baretta 92FS and I got really excited, never shot one. Round after round it stove piped. Right off the bat I asked him about lubrication. He said the Lubricated the gun, then wioed it off. I pull out a can of Rem Oil, sprayed the rails and poof no more stove pipes. We talked about keep the rails lubes to run smooth and he agreed.

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Welcome to the family brother @Mark361 and God bless you.

Hello and welcome @Mark361

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