New Gun Care

Hello All!

Is it suggested to have a new gun greased and checked before firing? And is this something my USCCA gun cleaning kit will allow me to do with my handgun? Are there tutorials on cleaning a gun on this sight?

I have done dry firing on it only thus far.

Thanks!

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Good Morning,
I can’t do a deep dive right now due to time limits. Just to get you going, start with your owners manual to get you going. I know our other members will be glad to assist you. Have fun.

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Youtube has tons of helpful videos on gun cleaning…

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I recommend it. Quality control at the factory is not always consistent. Field strip, inspect, clean, lubricate. It cant hurt.

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I agree with all of the above posts, doesn’t have to be a deep clean but you can oil and lube it before firing it. I didn’t do it to mine and never had a problem with it. But as soon as I get home from the range it gets wiped, oiled and lubed.

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Definitely field strip, cleaning and lubrication is a good idea.

Please check this thread, you can find ton of advices.

EDIT:

I think the posted link is not enough, not so many info there :wink:
Here is a good reading:
https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/blog/firearms-clean-clean-enough/

and here are “cleaning 101” videos, something you can start with:

Gun Cleaning 101 - YouTube
Basic Semi-Auto Pistol Cleaning - YouTube

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At the very least I like to run a dry patch down the bore to remove any left over preservatives and lubricants.
Study the material that your new gun came with and follow the manufacturer’s instructions.

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Using a Search Engine, like Google, enter you gun information with cleaning and lubing hit search. Select videos at the top. Videos may already be showing. Click on the videos for a variety of examples. Have fun.

Definitely clean your gun first then lube it as suggested. I’ve found most firearms need more oil than some people suggest. AR-15/M16s need a lot more than people let you believe. I’ve found my Taurus PT111G2 works better with more oil.

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Welcome to the gun owning community. Yes, it is recommended to strip, clean and re-lube a new firearm. The grease and oil you feel on a new firearm is designed to be a preservative, not a true lube designed for the stresses of firing and functioning.

What is your new firearm? Maybe we can get a little more specific as to instructions on cleaning and lubing?

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Congrats on your new firearm. I always start with a field strip to get gunk out. Also, it’s the best time to get familiarized with it.

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Yes you should. Gun cleaning is easy. If you have a uscca gun cleaning kit like I do. Then yes it should work for most calibers handgun. You can look up your type of gun on YouTube. There is always somebody there with a video showing you how to clean and take apart pretty much every gun out there.

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Not to confuse any new folks, all the above is good advice. I’ve never cleaned a weapon before using it ( except for surplus ). I’ve always made sure the barrel was clear & wiped any excess oil off. If any part was stiff I dry fired it ( if allowed ) several hundred times until it ran as wanted. Then off to the range & after that cleaned, oiled & checked it.

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Me being me, I will probably have the gun tore down to pieces parts at least 3 times before the end of the first week and probably modified or added something on it prior to the first range trip. I have a brand new Glock43X that I am already contemplating taking a Dremel to so that I can get that safety to sit flush on the trigger and polishing EVERYTHING that rubs slides or moves including the plastic parts. At a minimum I will disassemble and inspect everything to ensure there is no left over machine bits or other junk. After that it may not see anything vaguely resembling cleaning for a goodly number of rounds.

Cheers,

Craig6

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One of the firearms I bought had a note that the oil on the firearm was just there to protect against the environment and that it wasn’t lubed and ready for shooting. After that I just assumed to always take it down, inspect, clean, and lube before shooting it for the first time.

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Thank you, everyone!

I appreciate the amount of support in this community. It been a while since I have felt safety and comradery.

Is anyone in here in Arizona?

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I will field strip the weapon, do a visual inspection and dry fire before sending ammo down range then clean it after the first time I shoot it.

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I’ve been testing SHYF method by not cleaning my guns to see how it fairs over time. It’s my own understanding that if you’re in the middle of chaos constantly on the move you’re not likely going to have time to properly clean your weapon. Just an interesting test. I finally cleaned it. Functioned okay. But I made modifications to reduce other problems. Now to test some more. If you do that you need to live it generously.

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Interesting MikeBKY!

Why do you prefer to shoot it once, after stripping, inspecting and dry fire, before cleaning/greeacing it?

No cleanthe barrell edges and shiney spots if they are there prior to the first shot?

This is like scientific methedology :face_with_monocle:

Thanks!!

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Great input, thanks mdstanzel!

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In 37 years since I bought my first handgun, I have not had a new gun that was not ready for service right out of the box. I should clarify, I clean after the first trip to the range, not after the first shot, and that trip will put 100-200 rounds down range.
After shooting it, I will at least know if there is anything that needs to be tweaked before I fiddle with it.

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