New Gun Care

Yea, I caught that 1 shot cleaning ritual. Thought you meant after the range shooting though. Otherwise you’d look crazy. :wink:

BTW: I’m not suggesting people not clean their guns. It’s just a 40 year old question I finally decided to test. V Please! Clean your weapons.

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This is like debating about changing oil in your car.
There are people who claim they drove hundreds thousand miles without changing it.

:wink:

But…please change the oil in your car and firearm :slightly_smiling_face:

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Why would I change the oil on my car? I you never change the air in your tires.

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The same reason you lube your firearm :stuck_out_tongue:

:sweat_smile:

Actually I do. It is not a standard procedure… but after 2 years of driving and adjusting tire preasure (winter / summer) all tires have air replaced

:wink:

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What happened to me once, is I shot my brand new pistol, and the slide started to stick in extreme back position at random. I blamed bits of manufacturing debris mixed with factory preservative, for making the break in more pronounced. The gun took about 300 rounds to break in.

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It’s always a good idea to clean a gun thoroughly when new to remove the protectants they put on the gun when it leaves the factory. They don’t know how long the gun will be stored on a shelf nor in what conditions before it’s sold. Removing the factory protectants is a good idea.

Once the gun is clean, reapply a protectant that you would normally use - a bit of gun oil, CLP, or something similar.

Remember if you’re going to store them for a longer period of time, additional care may be needed in applying a protectant and in extreme cases for long term storage something like Cosmoline might be required. But cosemoline is NOT what you use regularly…

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Is it harmful to over clean if you are still removing residual prior or after the first round shot?

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It depends what is the solvent and how you clean it.
There’s no “over cleaning” . If it’s clean it cannot be cleaner :slightly_smiling_face:
Just be sure the solvent doesn’t stay in the areas you cannot reach. If you are not sure about it, use compressed air. Especially firing pin / striker channel.

Over lubing may be a problem. Be careful with it. Nothing wrong with using too much oil if you clean the firearm frequently. Remember that oil and grease attract the residue and keep it it place… so…just clean it.

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There is no such thing as overclean, as long as after you clean it, you go back and add a proper lube and protectant as needed. Perfect example is my Ruger Old Army revolvers. They are black powder, which is very corrosive if left even overnight. I have been known to just take the grips off after a long range session and just run them through the ultrasonic cleaner to make sure that every bit of black powder fouling is gone. An ultrasonic cleaner is basically chemical stripping and can do bad things to guns and finishes if the wrong solvent is used. Point is, they are as clean as possible, but then I have to go and make sure everything is lubed and protected, even in the lock mechanism.

So, long story short, if you clean it, lube it or at least wipe it down with an oiled patch and then wipe dry. That will leave a thin layer of oil protecting the metal.

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Thank you, for your reply Brian!

An ultrasonic cleaner, wow! What hertz is the frequency in which it cleans?

Do you where your ear protection?

“The general consensus is that a loud enough sound could cause an air embolism in your lungs, which then travels to your heart and kills you. Alternatively, your lungs might simply burst from the increased air pressure. … High-intensity ultrasonic sound (generally anything above 20KHz) can cause physical damage.”

Ultrasound, Wikipedia

I take it you do not have a dog? Or is the frequency contained in this unit?

Very interesting! Thank you for sharing this!

Do you find an all in one cleaner and lube to be sufficient along side wiping tools, brushes and a small air press?

What material is best to wipe during cleaning?

Thank you!

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@Heather16 thanks for your reply, but ultrasonic cleaners are not that exciting, at least in that they are contained within the unit. It does not seem to bother my dog in any way. There are a couple units available branded by major firearms related manufacturers such as Lyman and Hornaday. There are also a whole host of small units designed for doing things like cleaning jewelry. I also know of a few people who have purchased harbor freight units and have had completely satisfactory results for limited lite-duty use.

Here is the unit I have: https://www.opticsplanet.com/turbo-sonic-6000-ultrasonic-case-cleaners.html
Its a tight fit and have to have it just right.

The key is finding the right solution. In my example I use a very mild mostly water-based formula due to black powder fouling being very easy to remove, its just very corrosive if not removed and I am a bit paranoid like that. It is also handy for handgun barrels and such. But it is very easy to remove bluing and various finishes, destroy night sites, damage polymer frames, wood grips, you name it. They are also used by some reloaders (not me, I tumble my brass) to clean brass prior to reloading.

As for your other questions, I have a shameful amount of firearms oils, cleaners, you name it. I wipe it down with a lite oil such as a Remoil. What I also do is lyman has an ultrasonic lube that I run after I drain the cleaner and it will leave a dry film of lube to protect the metal. That keeps me from having to take off the sideplates of the revolver too much.

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On a new gun, I’d suggest a thorough field strip and cleaning before use. When a gun is manufactured they don’t know how long it will sit before being sold. It’s a good idea to remove the factory protectant before shooting. It’s also a good way to learn about your firearm and look for potential issues (rough surfaces, etc.) before taking it to the range.

While it’s certainly not required, I do recommend it. And admittedly, I’ve pulled some out of a box and shot away and cleaned and lined others so I don’t always follow my own advice. :slight_smile:

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In my opinion, always check any gun before firing new or used. That being said it never hurts to field strip a new pistol and clean it up before(and of course after) range day. Putting some rounds through a new pistol could help “break it in” a bit too.

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Why do some people over lubricate their rifles?

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Some people feel that if their rifle has been sitting around for a long time without being fired they need to over lube it. That’s the same way that they would lube their handguns. I wipe my down with a lubricant patch every few months used or not used. Also oil the slide rails and moving parts.

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A little oil isn’t going to hurt your rifle. But it’s not necessary to douse it. Still should be wiped down but won’t hurt it.

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I think its mostly an education issue.

A lack of knowledge and/or listening to others who also have a lack of knowledge. Most folks who don’t know firearms think “its moving, it needs oil” without knowing that only the contact parts really need it and they won’t know what those contact parts are.

Reading the manual that comes with the rifle, it usually tells you the right amount. And if it doesn’t come with one, you can usually find one online.

Having said all that, over-lubing is generally better than under-lubing.

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I hear ya. Oil attracts dust and lint, and I use only the minimal amount in my carry pistols, and wipe/relube whether it was sitting in the safe or in the holster, like @Johnnyq60 said. For rifles, I thought dousing it till it drips was a military habit, that had to do with dusty places… no dust storms in FL so far.

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Overlubing gives assurance that firearm will work in every environment and weather conditions. But as you mentioned, it attracts small particles so frequent cleaning is needed.

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Is it recommended for .308 and above, as well as .223?
Is it recommended for AKs, bolt action, as well as ARs? What about an AR with long stroke piston (per manual, you don’t lubricate that part at all)