Just read a thread on a outdoor forum, pistol break in

Should be interesting, opinions?

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Depends on the gun. My bro in law has a Les Baer 1911 that he hates, we’re on opposite coasts, but sounds like it needs some lapping, maybe running a stone on the slide. Otoh, my Springfield RO, mid level 1911, ran 100 percent from the first round . I’ve built 5 P80’s, and all required a bit, 2 are still happier with NATO ammo and +p hollow points, and the ceracoted .45 was just freaking brutal to get to work…but more like grinding, stoning, sandpaper and scotch Brite than just breaking in. Runs great now. My factory Glocks, Ruger and m&p…nah, load it, shoot it.
Aftermarket barrels sometimes need some attention, but again, not really break in, but a little lapping or stoning to free things up, hopefully just the right amount.
Get the feeling I took this in a direction most weren’t expecting. :laughing:
Looking forward to others experiences. Just had a rough “chat” with family…social distancing just got a lot easier :smirk:

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Some need it, some don’t. All my guns get it whether they need it or not. I need to run 500 or so flawless rounds of mixed profile through any gun that will own real estate on my body.

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As @mattm posted - depends on the gun.

My philosophy is that every firearm needs “break-in” period… this period is as long as user finds out how to efficiently use it and accurately shoot it.
I never handled any handgun that shot perfectly in my hands right out of the box.
A few I shot, really needed break-in (400 - 500 rounds) because they were extremely stiff and hard to operate easily (CZs, M&P9, RIA 1911) but all new handguns, those from better manufacturers, were perfectly fine after first round (STIs, Staccato, WC1911, DW1911, Walther PPQ).
As I mentioned - I always had to spend few shooting sessions to get used to each firearm and that was “break-in” period… firearm’s or mine… didn’t matter…

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If the Les Baer is running at anything less than 100% with factory mags and commercial ammo it needs to go back to Les Baer. They WILL make it right. That’s not the gun for kitchen gunsmithing and at their price point and reputation that gun should be absolutely FLAWLESS!!!

Cerakote is not the right finish for many parts/areas of a gun. It is not a metal finish, it’s a paint and adds significant size to parts. A tight fitting slide that gets Cerakoated will not fit anymore on to the frame, and the finish is so tough that it might require remachining tight fitting parts. You should NEVER Cerakote tight fitting areas of a gun such as rails and such. I’ve seen amateurs destroy guns which could no longer be reassembled after a kitchen Cerakote job.

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My Taurus PT1911 needed a feed ramp and chamber polish before it would feed HP ammo.
The lip of the mags were so sharp they would catch the edge of the rim on the casing and stop the round from feeding out of the mag, a polishing with a hard Arkansas stone. :us:

Trust me, it wasn’t me that ceracoted the rails and inner slide :roll_eyes:. Definite wtf moment.In hindsight, a funny moment .I handed the gun off to my cl. 3 FFL/truck mechanic neighbor,and 2 weeks later he gives me the “I got good news, and I got bad news.” Good news was he got the slide on, bad news is it wasn’t becoming off :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:… fortunately I have some tool making and manual machining in my background, and found, amongst the 4 and 5 axis monsters, that we still had a surface grinder and a Bridgeport (manual vertical mill for those not familiar). Couple slow nights at work and we were good to go.
My background is in turbine engine manufacture. Surface finishes, coatings and tight tolerances we’re my language, and tool making/grinding was often to “press fit” , “shrink fit” or “slip fit” tolerances…so looking at .0002" generally…

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I’m jealous!

I had to choose between table saw and radial arm moving into the retirement house :hushed:

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I think every pistol can be broken in. Some pistols (“duty” pistols Glock, M&P, etc) will run 100% right out of the box. But that doesn’t mean they aren’t a little “smoother” after a few hundred (or thousand!) rounds.

And then there are some pistols that literally won’t run right until you’ve spent a few hundred rounds through them.

My only personal anecdote on a firearm that needed a little “break in” was a Glock 43 that ejected one or two rounds per mag straight back at my face for some reason :crazy_face:. It stopped that after maybe 100-200 rounds.

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I’m assuming you chose “both” right?

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Yeah that would be a WTF moment for sure :rofl: Had a young man, friend of ours, destroy a perfectly serviceable Marlin lever gun by Cerakoating. He tried his damndest to get that bolt and lever back into the receiver and after hours of files, stones, sandpaper, and just about every abrasive he could come up with he figured out he now had a worthless pile of parts. Even screws would not go back in the threads. No one wanted to take on the salvage project, just cheaper to buy a replacement. It’s not the coating an amateur should pick up first.

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Thing that killed me was the delay waiting to get this coated, the assurance it was going to be a top notch job etc…they did do a nice job, just a bit too much of it lol.
I used to work on a lot of overhauled turbines ( O&R) and managed an O&R/weld shop. Should’ve sent us that lever gun. We would’ve weld filled the divots, milled it back to size,helicoiled the blown threads, maybe throw in a quench and temper, given it a nice carcinogenic cadmium finish, and thrown in 5 certificates of conformance verifying we dun did a gud job :sunglasses:…then covered it in ceracoted let your buddy try try again.:stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

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I think all that sexy work would have cost a little more than the gun was worth. But I’m sure it would have been a spectacular piece in the end :rofl:

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Just a thought, but I’ve had a few folks I train report the same experience with the 43 and my belief, and I say this with all the respect in the world, if that the shooter got broken in to the gun, not the other way around.

The Glock 43 is a tough little gun to shoot well and as we speed up shooting folks grips tend to get sloppy, specially at the beginning of ownership. Then they get used to the gun and subconsciously end up doing what they need to do with their grips to gain control over the tiny/light beast and all of a sudden all is well. That process usually takes a few hundred rounds.

My thought process on this view is that Glocks throw their brass precisely the same way every time during recoil (most guns will) so why would a random piece of brass decide to take a different route to the shooters noggin? I can’t think of anything mechanical that could cause this, especially something that would fix itself.

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The only time I have had this happen with my Glocks are with reloads using Hi Skor 700x. The flakey powder sometimes gave me inconsistent pressures.

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Yep, Good point and I can absolutely see that. But not related to break-in in the context of the thread because that’s not mechanical. Assuming good reloads or commercial ammo the ejection process in a Glock is pretty tight. But astute observation nevertheless!

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As far as mechanical break in the only thing I could see is the recoil spring, too heavy or not heavy enough, and/or weak wristing the pistol.

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Yep, weak wristing or not locking the gun with enough bilateral pressure on the grip frame I believe is the key to erratic ejection.

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whatever you do to a Glock, do not try to adjust the ejector angle. Don’t ask me how I know this :laughing:
fwiw, gen 3 and 4 ejectors are interchangeable and slightly different, at least for certain models afaik.

But yeah, total agreement with the above thoughts on spring tension, round hotness, slide resistance and grip…the ejector will be either the same as new…or broken. There is no in between.

I don’t know if a pistol needs breaking in, but after getting past “What do you mean, you bought another gun???” it’s sure a good follow-up excuse to get out to the range. “But now that I have it, I’ve got to break it in.”

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