High End & Most Expensive 1911's

Some of the comments in the EDC thread about Good 1911 brought up high end 1911’s.
Good 1911 - EDC - USCCA Community (usconcealedcarry.com)
Rather than highjack that thread, I thought it would be interesting to have a thread about high end as well as most expensive 1911’s.

To start it off, I found this article about high end 1911’s :
High End 1911s - Jackson Hole Shooting Experience (shootinjh.com)
It was no surprise to see the Cabot Big Bang Set ($4.5M) on the list. I get an email and the opportunity to make a down payment on the latest Limited Edition. With their “run of the mill” entry level models starting at ~$5K, the down payment is still outside my budget - but I still dream :slight_smile:

Christensen Arms don’t list any 1911’s on their website anymore, so I guess I missed my chance to own a new one, but there is half a dozen available on gunbroker.com starting at ~$2k right now.

There is a Dornaus & Dixon Bren Ten on gunbroker.com right now they are asking $15k for. One would think they would offer free shipping at that price point, but no.

So, what 1911’s do you guys and gals dream about that are outside your budget, or at least outside your comfort level for budget?

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I became a very practical man within first 2 years of my shooting journey.
Yes, I remember my dreams about pistols that cost over $5K… but what I would do with them these days?
There was one model I always wanted - Cabot “Lefty 1911”… but only because I wanted to surprise my colleagues on the Range and hit my buddy on the left with empty casings. :crazy_face: But $7K for a moment of fun? Nope.

Pistol must meet one of two functions - it is either in constant use, or will be easily monetized. Because I hate selling my guns, $3K is a maximum I’m willing to spend for a 1911.

However, it is always nice to watch beautiful and unique design. I like Cabot (OAK Collection), Wilson Combat, Nighthawk Custom and Les Bear

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My budget’s definition of high-end is something above $700.

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Exactly, BeanCounter! I am not an organized competition shooter. My main competition is myself and practice improves my edge there. When I was looking for a 1911, I settled on a Springfield Armory Range Officer about the time Brownell’s was having their Grand Opening on I-80. I bought a Wilson Combat compensator, had it machined to fit, added a Kimber guide rod for the extra length and a specially made take-down tool. All totaled now I have less than $1000 (including 4 new 8-round Kimber magazines) invested in a 1911 .45 ACP that shoots like a 9 mm and holds less than 3" groups at 25 yards.

A SA factory rep told me (in answer to my question about the RO’s ability to handle +P ammo), “Hell, yeah! The gun’s built like a tank! I wouldn’t make it the standard diet but for special purposes, go for it!”

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I’m not sure I’m as adventurous as you are. I’m considering a Kimber Ultra II and plan on keeping it stock.

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Wife bought me a Wilson Combat CQB years ago and the gun was a great investment that hat tripled in value from what we paid for it. That gun has satisfied my need for a “premium” 1911 for many years. It f I was going to take the plunge again it would be a 4” Les Baer.

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Adventurism really has little to do with it. It’s more practical IF you are planning to use the gun for personal protection, family protection , plinking or EDC use because: In the case of a personal defense encounter/incident where your attacker is DOA at the hospital, the Police will probably confiscate your weapon as evidence. When you get it back I guarantee it won’t be in the same condition it was in when it left. Fancy, big name guns seem to grow legs and get a lot of range time while in the evidence lock-up.

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As a member one of your benefits is $10,000 for miscellaneous expenses which includes firearm replacement f you lose it to an evidence locker. Thats why I’m not very concerned about carrying my Wilson Combat as a CC gun when I need longer range capability.

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Knowledge is power. Thanks for the info.

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I bought a Cobra 357 magnum in 1984 for $350.00! Now, that was a good investment. NOT FOR SALE! Wilson Combat 1911 is and has been in my sights. I heard about the new 2011’s and I thought @Jerzees might fill us in on them!

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Those are yesterday’s news. :grinning:
Atlas, Masterpiece, Bul, EAA even has a 2311! :wink::grinning:

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Stacatto, Wilson Combat, Nighthawk, Ed Brown, Les Baer, Cabot, theres quite a few out there for high end 1911s. I think my next pistol project is going to be putting together a 7" longslide double stack 10mm 1911 from Fusion.

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I’ll be more than happy to do this… but any particular manufacturer? :slightly_smiling_face:

The name of 2011 is actually reserved to Staccato these days. That’s the reason the other manufacturers started their own naming, like 2311.
However I really like using 2011 for any pistol that meets original 2011 idea and design, meaning - 3 parts of the gun - slide, frame and grip (1911 doesn’t have separate grip module).

There are a lot of new or somehow new 2011-sh products. Some of them are great, some not good and some of them that are still unknown to me.

These below are top of the line:

  • Nighthawk Custom: TRS, SandHawk, BDS9, President DS, Bob Marvel DS
  • Atlas: NYX, Ares, Athena, Hyperion
  • TTI Pit Viper / Sand Viper
  • BUL SAS II

These 2011 style pistols below popped up in recent years… but I’m not happy about them. They aren’t so reliable as Staccato:

  • Cosaint COS21
  • SA Prodigy

These below are still a mystery to me:

  • Oracle 2311
  • Girsan Witness 2311

Along with 2011 style firearms, there are 1911 Double Stack (DS) models that are great and worthy to look at them:

  • Dan Wesson (CZ) DWX and DWX-C
  • Wilson Combat: EDCx9, eXperior, SFT9 and SFX9
  • Kimber KDSc9

This one below is a interesting option, however cannot be considered as high-end model:

  • Stealth Arms Platypus 1911 DS (with Glock magazines)

I excluded Staccato line from these lists… because Staccatos are actually the real 2011s, all of them are awesome and shouldn’t be mixed with their “clones”… :wink:

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Exellent post @Jerzees!

For those of us that like pictures:


2011

Dissembled 1911 Double Stack looks just like a 1911 Single Stack, i.e., slide and one piece frame/grip:
image
1911 Single Stack pictured - I don’t own a 1911 Double Stack. Sorry about the slide and frame/grip being reversed, maybe I’ll take another pic next time dissassembled.

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I bought my Les Baer Monolith 45 about 20 plus years ago. It was over $2k back then. Not really interested in buying another 1911.

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Double stack 1911 frame is exactly the same. Just bulky at the grip part.
A little difference with grip panels, these are not interchangeable with 1911 single stack.

A 2023-12-07 15-38-59

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I can’t tell if that means you bought the best from the get go and no reason to consider another. Or does it mean you learned you don’t like the 1911 platform and moved on to something else?

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I do like the 1911 platform, but for my purposes I prefer guns that are more concealed gun friendly. Lighter and greater capacity. I love shooting the Baer, but the training I do is very tactical in nature, so there are better options for that.

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I think high-end 1911s are for three types of people.

1911 aficionados. Absolute fans of the platform.

Gun people who are not in that fandom but want a prime example of the platform. These are folks who are only going to have one, but want the best example they can afford.

People who are going to have one for EDC or home defense. You get what you pay for, and the 1911 can be finicky. I would be there would a lot of overlap on a Venn diagram of groups 1 and 3.

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No one has mentioned the Springfield Armory Custom/Professional line. Any one with experience with these?

Springfield Armory Professional 1911 - The Armory Life

image

“the magwell funnel draws fresh magazines like politicians suck up other people’s money”

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