Gun Cleaning Brushes

My firearm was filthy after the Defensive Shooting Fundamentals Instructor course. I shot about 750 rounds that weekend and my gun needed to be cleaned before I went… (Let’s just leave it at life has been too busy lately and I slacked on cleaning my gun before class.)

After a rather involved cleaning with cotton swabs and an assortment of brushes, I’m guessing there’s got to be better brushes for cleaning your gun.
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Photo from Midway USA of the Otis All Purpose Gun Cleaning Kit.

What is your favorite gun cleaning brush?

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The nylon brush and bore snake

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I like an electric SpinBrush when I clean my own. When they’re worn out, a new one is around $8-$9 to replace brush heads about $4 for two new ones. Works well with many areas a brush can get to.

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On the rare occasion that I clean my sticks I generally go ALL out and disassemble them to component parts then LIBERALLY hose them down with CLP and let them sit for a couple hours and go after them with a bronze brush. If they are really nasty (like after shooting with Bullseye powder) I will hose them down and let them sit again and scrub them again. Then I will take Brake Cleaner, Carburetor Cleaner or Dry Cleaning Solvent and hose them down and scrub with a nylon brush. One more time with CLP and wipe down, re assemble and grease lube the important parts.

For cleaning barrels I am a fan of Butch’s Bore Shine and a bronze bore brush but if the copper is REALLY bad and I am going back to zero I will submerge/fill with Hoppe’s #9 or even straight ammonia (you need to neutralize ammonia if you use it straight (the solution to pollution is dilution) and HOT water w/ a touch of Baking Soda works well followed by gun oil or motor oil)

Cheers,

Craig6

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@Dawn It’s not your brushes and swabs that do the work, it’s your choice of cleaning fluids. That’s where the magic happens.

Cheers,

Craig6

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In addition to the usual cleaning rod and bore brush, I use old tooth brushes and tooth picks. I was taught to clean guns by my Dad. His method was to use the solvent (Hoppes #9), then clean off any remaining solvent with rubbing alcohol, then a light coat of oil for a lubricant. He thought that if the remaining solvent wasn’t removed it would break down the new coat of lubricant. I can only imagine what he would have to say about CLP :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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I will second that a lot of the work is the solvent…

I use the nylon brush pictured above most of the time. I have a couple of guns that are stubborn in spots, and they get the brass one also pictured above. I use them for one season, then toss them for new ones.

For bores, I use both nylon and brass. I use the nylon ones about 80% of the time on pistols, and 40% of the time on rifles. Yeah, I measured that, scientifically, both ways, and even on Sunday. :smiley:

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“Oral-B Pro-Health Superior Clean Manual Toothbrush” … sounds professional :wink: … it’s just regular tooth brush. Never needed anything harder, however I also keep brass brush.
For bore - I’m using bore brush which came with the gun.

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Nylon brush and boresnake for me too!

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Old toothbrushes, Q-Tips, and a brass brush for the barrel.

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