Explanation on grain types

I tend to prefer somewhat heavier bullets in a given caliber. While velocity is most important in the energy equation mass is equally important in the momentum equation. Especially when maintaining momentum and avoiding deflection when hitting bone. Important to me since the main target areas on bad guys are surrounded by a lot of bone. There are unfortunately few tests of bullets going through bone and none I have seen with a high enough sample size to factor out all the variables so my decision is largely based on unproven theory backed by a bit of common sense. Though I doubt most LE agencies would use 147gr 9mm if the results on the street showed that lighter and faster bullets were significantly better.

Heavy bullets also tend to better maintain their admittedly slower velocity at longer distances and therefore may be more likely to perform as designed at longer ranges. Fast bullets need to not over expand and fold back at really close ranges and therefore may not open as well when they slow down at longer ranges. I have come across a few tests that indicate this to be likely true. Though this is not an issue at typical SD ranges if the round is well designed.

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Check out Paul Harrel, he tests targets constructed with pork or beef ribs to “simulate” rib bones.

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Grain is important in the sense that it directly impacts the amount of energy delivered at a given velocity. Energy = 1/2mass x velocity squared. This tells us that velocity is the larger driver behind energy and, an illustrative example, a 150 grain bullet at 1000fps would deliver 333ftlbs of energy. Halving the bullet weight to 75 grains, and to equal the same energy, only requires us to step up to 1,420fps, not double the velocity. For home defense, several considerations are important, bullet design and velocity being the most important in my mind. Both of these impact penetration and the last thing we want in a home defense situation is a bullet of a design and such velocity that the entire bullet, or harmful fragments, penetrate walls, in case of a miss, or completely going through the threat and harming our family members or neighbors.

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Welcome to the family @Bjorn and you are blessed to be here.

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I buy the same grains weight bullet for practice as what my conceal ammo has so the pistol will act the same when I need to use it. I use 124 grains hollow points for my conceal and carry pistol.

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You gotten a lot of info from people I would assume are in the know but in the end for me it’s about a hollow point round from a premium manufacture which my gun and I shoot well. When all else is said and done its about proper bullet placement. Because even the most potent round, shot from the best blaster 3000 is ineffective if you can’t hit the target

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Where your bullet hits is far more important than the type of bullet or the weight of the bullet. Most any bullet will do the damage you want if it hits your intended target in the intended spot. The best bullet you can find will not do the damage you want if it doesn’t hit the spot you intend to hit. Your skill is far more important than your bullet. There is no magic bullet and there never will be. Pick a bullet, any bullet. Become familiar with your gun by doing a ton of dry practice; become familiar with your ammunition by doing a substantial amount of live fire. You will be far better served if you direct your attention toward perfecting your skills, shooting skills and defensive skills.

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Yes, I have their site bookmarked and am going to look at it during our impending snowstorm!

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Welcome @Bjorn! This is a great community. As a new gun owner, I have gotten excellent advice and suggestions for any topic I’ve posted.

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That simplifies it for me and puts the focus back on, right now, what is most meaningful to me as a new handgun owner. I dry-fire every day for 15 minutes, and prior to and subsequent to my range time. That alone is challenge enough for me at this point. I’ve gained a much deeper appreciation for the difficulties in being an accurate shooter. In the handgun world, art doesn’t imitate life.

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Dry fire practice is very important indeed. In the morning when I put my holster on and get ready to go, I make it a point to perform 10 good draws from concealment. I also try and get some time in with my AR doing ready-ups from low ready and high ready.

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That’s ok… the word is properly spelled “gist,” anyway. :upside_down_face:

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Good for. Hopefully you are practicing the draw while dry firing. I learned fron others here you should also vary the clothing and also positions…standing, sitting, etc. An eye opener for me was lying in bed simulating being asleep. I was under the covers and timed myself on how long it took me to retrieve my firearm. Needless to say the night time staging area is closer now and easier to operate.

Never stop learning and stay safe.

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At my CCW qualification, I met a retired US Marshall who told me he always used Liberty’s Civil Defense rounds. For him, it wasn’t the “stopping power” that was most important, but the damage done. These bullets in 9mm are only 50 grains, but their muzzle velocity is 2000 fps.

Compared to a 115 grain bullet at 1185 fps, that’s about 27% more kinetic energy expended to arrest the bullet. Plus, they’re designed to fragment across a wide cone.

The Marshall told me, I might think his grouping was bad, but in fact, he trains to place his shots in a broader area, four corners of a box, in order to do even more damage.

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I had a good friend tell me he kept gun and ammo in two different spots (because children). He said “I can get to it and load it in < 30secs”. Now… 30secs sounds like forever to me, but I asked him if he’s tried it and does it actually take 30secs. Turns out he did the test years ago and just remembers it being really fast. Well he went home and tried it with the wife using a stopwatch, and he had forgotten where the key was, then the key got stuck, took him about 5mins on the first try. Second try, was about a minute and he was racing to get there. Needless to say he also reconsidered the staging of his firearms.

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Good Grief!! Some of y’all are getting wayyy too technical. Just put 15 of whatever you got in his chest and he’ll leave you alone. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

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I think that sums it up! :crazy_face:

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I have looked at their website and will order a box to try some. Thanks for that tip.

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Welcome to the family brother @Glenn16 and you are blessed to be here.

So for me it was less about how long it took me to get to the lock box. It was how long it took I got to it. Fiddling with the key, then having to slide the lock box out of the frame that anchors it, etc.

At night it is stored in a custom made hidden in plain site box. It is secured with an RFID lock. I only store it in that while I sleep. While I am awake it is on me unless I am in the shower.

I now use the lock box for the spare I have. If I am travelling to NY, I will also use it to lock both away.

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