Be Very Concerned or Propaganda from the main stream press

“The agency is prohibited by law from publicly releasing detailed information about where stolen guns end up. The information can, however, be shared with police investigating a crime.”

So what I read here is, gun owners have a problem but we can’t, by law, really tell you what that problem is.
I’ve read quite a bit of the stuff “The gun safety group Everytown” put’s out and have come to the conclusion, they are really really good at cherry picking government statistics to support their antigun ideology. For example, in this article, the time frames they use are specifically picked to look terrible even though they in many cases are out dated:

“The rate of stolen guns from cars climbed nearly every year and spiked during the coronavirus”

“Nearly 112,000 guns were reported stolen in 2022, and just over half of those were from cars — most often when they were parked in driveways or outside people’s homes, the Everytown report found. That’s up from about one-quarter of all thefts in 2013,”

" the rate of other things stolen from cars has dropped 11% over the last 10 years, even as the rate of gun thefts from cars grew 200%, Everytown found in its analysis of FBI data."

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Let’s think for a moment. With one million guns being sold per month for over the past five years; just over 60k from cars in ‘22. The whole freaking year saw over 12M gun sales and only 60k were stolen from cars! Damn, let’s turn this mole hill into Mallory being lost on Everest.

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While I don’t trust anything coming from “Everytown”, who has a clear agenda, I have seen an increase in car breakins in general. So…don’t be stupid and leave your gun in the car. Simple, problem solved.

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I 100% believe there are two or three times as many guns stolen out of cars vs 10 years ago. I would actually guess it to be even higher.

More people than ever are carrying, more people than ever have permits, more people than ever carry permitless or in a car without a permit…and cars are very easy to break into.

There are simply that many more opportunities for it to happen.

There are a lot of guns out there. There are a lot of cars out there. There are a lot of cars being broken into.

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Are we saying it’s OK to break into a car and take the gun if someone is stupid enough to leave it in there. Doesn’t bid too good for those of us stupid enough to leave our wives at home alone while we go to work, now does it? How about calling the CRIMINAL Stupid, you know, the one that’s actually breaking the law?

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We gun owners in general, IMO, as a whole, we do need to do better in regards to leaving cars in vehicle. It’s fairly common for people to leave handguns in unlocked vehicles and, well, yeah, you “should” be able to do that (I guess, though I doubt there has been an era in the history of all animal species in which theft didn’t exist) but, ya can’t…not without that risk.

Do everything you can to not leave a gun in a car, and lock the car with the gun out of sight if you can’t avoid it…even better have a lock box for the gun.

https://www.center-of-mass.com/car-lockers/

A vehicle is much much easier to smash and grab than a house is, and a gun is a lot different than a person.

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Nope. Not saying that at all. “Call the criminals stupid…” sure, whatever makes you feel better. Are you really going to compare leaving a gun in the car with leaving a spouse at home? Seriously? My wife knows how to defend herself! I’d argue that leaving a gun in your car, knowing that car breakins are at an all time high in many areas, does indeed make that person dumber than the criminal.

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This. Always locked and my weapon is typically with me on my person when I leave the vehicle. If I absolutely must leave it in the car, it’s locked in a safe secured to the vehicle and out of sight.

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What I’m saying is, I grow tired of hearing about how stupid the victim was without hearing how despicable the criminals are.

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I get it and I totally agree but here my point was simply for us ,responsible gun owners, to be just that. Responsible.

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The problem is that the only way to keep the despicable criminals from easily getting what they want is to try and be smart enough to avoid becoming a victim.

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Oh man, and here I thought you were going to say put holes in them and let the meat wagon take them away, :joy:

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Sometimes that can be the smart/only way to avoid being a victim.

Though I prefer to use the few brain cells I have to try and avoid getting into situations where that becomes the only option.

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Hi Bjorn.

The numbers are staggering to me.

Those are the guns on the streets which influence us to “carry”, though legally, ourselves.

I can appreciate your points. Of course a main reason not to have one stolen is it being used later in a crime. I can’t fathom the thought. Of course then many downstream problems; I’d have to report it, the turmoil, aggravation headaches, it would also be a big loss to me - selfish reasons. I hope and wonder if the powers that be would see the dilemma and there would be less “prohibited” signs, “wishful thinking” on my part.

Completely separate topic, this week I wrote my local law makers asking for their support. Felt good.

Stay safe all.

You might be surprised who “speaks and presents” in this vid. (apologies if it was posted above already, I was having IT difficulties viewing all the posts):

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I was told by a friend in local law enforcement that it’s important to know where you are going in advance and if they are gun friendly. People have been caught watching people as they approach someplace that is “no firearms allowed “ and they watch to see the people who return to cars, which door is opened and see if the person merely forgot something or seems to be putting or locking something away. With more CCW’s and the fact I’m in a Constitutional Carry state there are many more opportunities to steal a gun if you know what to look for. They are also usually armed with bolt cutters for the gun safes secured by cable.

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Hear you.

I had my car broken into once, didn’t leave “it” inside the car. They ripped the radio right out of the dash. They were super fast as I was only in the store a few minutes. I suspect they used tools easily found in any dollar or hardware store. I even saw the perpetrator in the lot as I walked in, then when I got back to my car, he and his car were long gone. Costed me a fortune in repairs.

Someone suggested, if you absolutely must lock it in, do it a block away from your stop, because as you point out, they sit/watch us prey come to them - said hunter.

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Problem with parking a block away,…

If they’re watching that lot, they have that much longer head start on “stealing from” you before you return.

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Small thing: Robbery requires threat or use of force. You can’t rob a car/building when nobody is there, robbery requires that you be present.

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You’re a lawyer?

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Not required… easy lookup

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