Anyone have a gun safe in the garage?

Does anyone have a gun safe in their garage?
Do you have trouble with rust or condensation?

I’m not a fan of the golden rod heaters mainly because they call them dehumidifiers.

I guess there’s old fashioned cosmoline.

What about break free collector?

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I had an old stack on cabinet in the garage at the last house. I didn’t keep firearms in it, but I gained a little knowledge from the experience. Two problems with that depending on where you live and habits. South Texas has sauna-esque temperature and humidity most of the year. I had a humidity that I had a terrible time mitigating, to the point of cardboard boxes falling apart at first. Was able to reduce, but not eliminate the humidity. Second would be that I go in and out of my garage often. Everyone can see that there was a gun cabinet in there. They may not know it’s got a bunch of stuff worthless to most of the population inside, but for the right person, it creates curiosity and temptation. If possible, I would just put the safe inside against an exterior wall.

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Our firearms are stored in safes located inside the house walls.
I would never put a safe in the garage as I don’t want to risk a passerby seeing it.

Humidity is not much of an issue where I live so can’t help there.
Good luck :slight_smile:

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I wish I could convince the wife to move somewhere dry.

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Good question. I think about temps going up, down, cooler at night, warmer at day, building up moisture.

One can even feel the coolness of the firearm on one’s hands earlier the morning of.

Remedy might be keeping the garage a consistently same room warm temp all day, but I guess costs an issue to have a 24/7 heated garage.

Guess one can test it out with various metals, but it’s the internal parts of a firearm I can’t wipe down, which would concern me.

I’m trying waxing the outside of my firearms. So far, it seems to help, as the rust can’t take hold or dig deep, but floated on the surface, for an easy wipe down regularly. But the inside is ‘naked to the eye’ until too late.

I also experienced rust in my fishing tackle box, on my terminal tackle gear, and learned the hard way, that it only takes one drop of water, a spec of rust, then it grows and feeds on the other metal. Even with the box stored indoors, in the home. I have to dry off my tackle before re-storing in the box and work on dehumidifying it internally. So far, able to manage it well.

Stay safe, stay dry.

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I live in coastal Virginia, so it gets HOT and HUMID as well as cold and humid. My safe is not a conventional buy it from a dealer, it’s a military surplus one. I have it sitting on a 1" rubber “anti fatigue” mat for industrial purposes so it has one inch holes drilled into it. That is a major factor, get it off the concrete floor.

Next I use desiccant bagged up in some random durable fabric. Once a year or so, usually in the cold months I will take the desiccant in and cook it in the oven at ~125 - 150*F for about 8 hours and hang it back in the safe. Been doing this for 30 odd years with all manner of bang sticks. The only problem I ever had was when I got hurry up deployed after blackpowder season and didn’t properly clean my 54 Cal. 4 1/2 months later the bore was a wreck but it didn’t affect anything else in the safe.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I would hesitate to do so. Garages may be safe for classified material and corvettes but I want my guns to be better protected than that level of security.

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I have a pump action that Id like to keep in the garage but havent made a move on the safe yet. I know I need to.

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I say Hooah! :us: to that

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Well due to the size and weight of the safe, it’s looking like the garage or I don’t get the safe. So 99% sure it’s going in the garage.

We’ve been wanting a tornado shelter, so the two car garage is possibly becoming a 1.5 car garage and the safe will definitely be out of sight at that point. Sounds like a mini man-cave might be in the works too!!!

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There are these things called basements which double as tornado shelters. Reinforced concrete make a pretty good landing spot for the biggest rig in a garage. Make it three times bigger than you need it now and enjoy the ride. If the water table wasn’t 8’ below grade (3’ on a full moon) I’d have been there already.

Cheers,

Craig6