Weekend Training: One-handed shooting

How do you practice one-handed shooting?

4 Likes

I let it hang as if immobilized. I was taught that by a Marine onboard back in the 80’s. His reasoning was that if you were shot in the arm or shoulder and the fight was still going on you would be in pain . To move the arm around would most likely increase the pain making it harder to keep your mind in the fight.

7 Likes

I agree. Tuck it in a pocket or belt or something to help support the weight. That could also help minimize movement and reduce pain. Whatever can help you stay in the fight.

4 Likes

I also agree. My firearms instructor in the SO was a Vietnam era USMC SSgt. who professed that there were very few reasons to shoot one handed, either your cover would not allow a supported hand or one of your hands was inoperable. Either way, that means shooting with your non-shooting hand out of the way, usually at your side.

2 Likes

Yea. I just either let hang to my side or I bend arm and bring tight to body. This option is better for a severe bleeding injury (lower half of arm) and may reduce pain… so I’ve been told.

3 Likes

“to think that people are not even allowed to question the time-honored traditions”… um, ,maybe I missed that part of my indoctrination… er…education … I pretty much question. If things don’t have an obvious reason, I ask and consider for myself.

At the range Friday, practiced both arm at side and on chest.

One instructor of mine had us do our first string of one-handed fire with the unused arm folded behind our waist and gripping our belts at the back from the inside. This was specifically to keep that hand occupied and to give you something to grip and to keep it out of the way, not for self-defense reasons. After that, he had us put it at our side or on our chest.

What I find weird is having the hand open relaxed… if the off hand is in a fist, it can be wherever and it’s fine, but open, it distracts me. I think that may be because if I’m shooting I expect to be gripping with both hands. Noticed that on Friday, so I’ll be practicing that now.

4 Likes

Oh, and speaking for the not-spring-chickens camp, one more reason you might be one handed is using that other arm for bracing against an object, or getting off the ground. Some of us dont have the knees we used to, and while adrenaline will help, it doesn’t give you new knees.

Another reason might be holding a child or supporting a loved one. While I’d want them behind me (if not behind cover) I can imagine scenarios where the 3 seconds time frame doesn’t allow that. Or where someone you love goes down as a first casualty of a shooter and the initial seconds go to grabbing/supporting them before you identify what has happened and respond.

5 Likes

Or the attacker is at close range, and you are holding them off while engaging with your firearm.

I let it hang. Barring using it as support/defensively, if I’m not using it, I’m probably injured. I need to be able to hit what I’m aiming at, with the dead weight at my side.

3 Likes

I am new at pistols. I have been practicing one handed both strong and off handed. HELP. I have noticed that left handed (off hand), my group is right of bulls eye. With strong hand, I am left of bulls eye. With two hands I have a good group around center of target. I expect someone has worked through this problem before. Suggestions on how to solve this problem. What is causing it? I think I have the same sight picture with either hand. Started at 7 yards for this training before I move back. Any help will be appreciated. Drills would also be appreciated.

3 Likes

Here’s why to practice one handed. Shooting, and reloading. Never know when an accident might leave you injured.

Working on my truck. Was cutting a rubber hose, and my hand slipped. In that hand was a Buck 450T. I ran the blade into my wrist, all the way to the bone. Luckily, I missed the artery, and tendons.

3 Likes

OUCH my friend :grimacing: that looks like it hurt :frowning:

2 Likes

OUCH! Looks like that hurt more than just a little @45IPAC!

1 Like

So glad you missed the artery and tendons - it could have been so much worse, @45IPAC!!

2 Likes

Dang @45IPAC, that looks brutal - and as @Dawn said, super lucky you did not hit artery nor tendon!
How is it healing?

Not comparable, but reminds of the time I slipped and stuck my Puma pocket knife about an inch into my thigh. Didn’t do that much damage as it only hit muscle, but I remember it burned. I also remember thinking if I ever get stuck in a knife fight I hope I can divert it into my thigh. :grinning:

Two days later it stiffened up and really hurt. Then I started thinking I hope I never get in a knife fight! :-1:

1 Like

It’s healing well. Got the stitches out on the 30th. Now just some swelling to go down, mostly scar tissue.

1 Like

Glad you’re ok! Good luck on the rest of your recovery.

2 Likes

With something else in my left hand. Usually a knife or flashlight. If I am practicing shooting one handed I am practicing CQB or retention shooting.

2 Likes

I dedicate one handed shooting every time I go to the range. left & right handed.I di the first before I’m a bit worn out. I go to the range every other weekend but I stay for over an hour & shoot 100s of rounds

2 Likes

There are two main types of practice. CQC and distance.
AT distance gun hand fully extended. Body in duelist stance (makes less of a target ). A great tactic in home defense when not CQC.

In CQC gun is usually held close to the body. I find that hard to shoot accurately if outside CQC distance. I practice more on home defense, 21 to 30’ in duelist position.

Try shooting balloons in the wind. Great training.

A firm grip is a must, Right of POA hits usually trigger problem RH shooters i.e.) Opposite for LH shooters.

I have transitioned to two eyes and find it works better. In addition front sight on target is the call. Dry fire at home, pick a light socket or switch, draw gun and put front sight on target. Then check the sight picture with the front and rear sights. You will be amazed at how accurate that is.

Next dry fire at a short distant target,(less than 12") note if the sight remains on target after pulling the the trigger. Another great training action.

If ever in the Phoenix area I can take you to my secret desert spot for shooting of any type.

Cheers

Alan

Email address removed for your privacy. ~Dawn

1 Like

I don’t really have one thing I do with my free hand. Sometimes I find myself placing it on my hip and shooting sideways, like you’d see in old Army photos. I’m not really trying to pose like a tough guy from another era, it just keeps my off-hand out of the way so I don’t do something stupid. Sometimes I put my off-hand in my pocket, for the same reason.

The thing is, there are so many reasons why you might have to shoot one-handed in real life. Maybe you’ve been injured, or perhaps you’ve found cover and you are presenting the smallest target possible. Maybe you’re using your free hand to control a child and keep them behind you. Perhaps your attacker has control of one arm, or is so close that you have to use the “close in ready” position to avoid getting your firearm taken from you. My point is that there’s not a single one-handed stance that covers all possibilities, there are a lot of things that can go wrong in the real world.

2 Likes