Striker-fired Hammer fired

Very helpful images.

The first one shows exactly how I put my M&P away. My primary holster is set up to require safety engagement, so it’s just a handoff from me to the holster with one of us always securing the safety. Some guns have such a stiff detent that I need to shift my grip around to push up with the end of my thumb (lookin’ at you, Kimber). In any event, I am going to engage the safety one way or another before holstering — then just leave my thumb where it is, consciously holding the lever in place until the holster takes over.

The second image shows how the grip shifts to hold the pistol “front to rear” when the thumb is not available to retain a “side to side” grip. I don’t have grip safeties, but I can see how it is disengaged by the hammer hold — I can also see how a combination of large hammer, long beavertail, and short thumbs might make the “thumb over” grip a little precarious.

The photos show exactly what I see, but they might support different solutions to different folks.

Beyond my experience, but I do see how “hammer hold” on the DA communicates when something is up with the trigger. If I understand how it works, the “Glock block” does something very similar for that brand of hammerless/safetyless fans.

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No Kimber - Magnum Research 1911c. AKA Desert Eagle 1911, We in the state of Massachusetts can’t own Kimbers! I love mass firearm restrictions :laughing:

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I was just jabbing at my own armory. Kimber Micro380 is in mostly just a miniature 1911 with most of the modern improvements, but all of the familiar features. My only gripe is a safety detent about twice as strong as it should be, and no extended lever that I have found — took about both hands to engage when new. A bit stronger than I’d like but not a problem getting it disengaged — just no way to reengage with a swipe of the middle knuckle.

Standard magazine is 6+1 with 7+1 available. Not sure why MA would object.

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what about a handgun ( semi auto ) with no external hammer that can be internal hammer fire or striker fire ? Hmmm .
Let me know what your thoughts are.
PS: my first choice is a wheel gun but not my only choice.

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Whoops! :sweat_smile:

Id argue you copied me in the future!

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I’m from the same camp as you are. I have an H&K P30sk (DA/SA)with a LEM trigger. The trigger is very light. My thumb always goes over the hammer when drawing or returning the pistol to the holster. It’s just an added safety feature, and easy to get comfortable with. It’s also ambi, with ambi paddle mag releases too. Great for us southpaws!

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@James1160 welcome to the team

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I love those paddle mag releases. What digit do you use to drop the mag? I settled on trigger hand middle finger

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I absolutely agree. But that does not mean that you need to know or understand the difference between striker fired or hammer fired. Using a belt sander does not require knowledge of using a rotary sander.

Don’t get me wrong, but knowing how your firearm works in important but it is not dependent upon knowing how all firearms work.

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I have both hammer & striker pistols. The only hammer fired semiautos are my 1911s. If I choose to carry one which I will do occasionally, I carry it cocked & locked. I did have a Ruger P89 in the mid-90s which was hammer fired & I must admit that I miss it. I consider my striker fired pistols very safe. Two of my carry pistols do not have a manual safety which is fine with me ( Glock 26, S&W Bodyguard 380). My Walther CCP & Ruger LC9S do have a manual safety. I simply disengage the safety as I am holstering them.

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Sadly, about 90% of new gun owners since the “pandemic” would find themselves in that situation. To date, I have instructed 6 people in Basic Handgun familiarization to include range time. I’ve also instructed a dozen others who claimed to have a working knowledge of gun safety and how their own handgun functions. 90% of those “experienced” shooters were sorely lacking in safe firearms handling before I worked with them.

And zero percent knew anything about trigger break point or trigger reset point on their own handgun.

People tell you how much they know about guns. When we get into the classroom and on to the range, it’s quite a different story. I find it personally edifying to teach brand new female gun owners.

They listen, they come with no bravado, baggage or bad habits. And they almost always end up being the most successful.

Stay safe.

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I definitely encourage everyone to know how the handgun works, not only how to shoot it. Pressing the trigger is an easy action.

I like to help and explain everything to my students but I don’t want to hear the questions “why this pistol doesn’t have this little thing on the back” at shooting class. Something like this should be clarified before or during the purchase.

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My question was in response to learning about other guns, besides their own, in case they suddenly come across a stranger’s gun and need to use it immediately in defense of life.

Definitely learning how their own firearm functions, and drilling the 4 rules from the beginning, is paramount.

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As my father(and mentor) used to say; “I asked you what time it was, not how to build a watch.”

All kidding aside, knowledge of internal workings is important, but I don’t think it’s neccessary. I think practice is much more important with the instrument of choice. As the saying goes, “beware of the man with one gun.” Having several is great, but the focus should be on delivering the round where it’s needed as quickly as possible, with the fewest mistakes.
With regards to new gun owners, I’d guess there’s a fear with having a round in the chamber and the anxiety that goes with it. I know I had that fear when I first began to carry. Thumb over hammer helped me alleviate that issue.
Practice, practice, practice.
PS: it’s 10:43 AM;)

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Same! Trigger hand middle finger. I have some nerve damage in my hands(and arms), and the paddles help quite a bit vs. fumbling with the traditional button release. I adore my .45 Sig Scorpion Carry 1911 too, but it’s cumbersome for me to quickly swap mags.
Health & well-being is doing the best with what you’ve got, right?
Many regards,
-Jim

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I am going off-topic. We have a few villagers already written what about to write. If you are a new gun owner, I feel strongly you need to know your firearm- Maintenance is a priority. Are the new owners learning how to disassemble their guns when taking a class? Do they know anything about oil or CLP for their particular pistol? Are the new guns owners just going to drop off their firearm to a gunsmith every 1000 rounds for them to clean? It is a lethal dam tool you have in the home or on your person. Hmmm, hell yes, I will take my time to understand my firearms! If I have to miss a few episodes of the Witcher, so be it. My rant/ two cents…

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I don’t like strikerfire safeties, but I do like the 1911 safety.

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welcome to the family @James1160 and you are blessed to be here.

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Thank you Johnnyq60!
I am proud to be here.
God bless you and your family!

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image

Work of art?

@Jerzy

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