Red dot or laser?

What are the pros and cons for them?

And if you had to pick, which one?

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I have found lasers to have limited use and can give you away in some circumstances.
I have red dots on many of my rifles and shotguns, better aiming with both eyes open and faster target acquisition. :us:

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I would use the laser to hunt mountain lions :joy: but I would always prefer to use red dot on my EDC. Quick acquisition and better shots. :red_circle:

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Neither one.
But if I need to choose, I will go with red dot.
So far my eyes are still good enough to use iron sights. But I know the time will come when my eyes will need help, so red dot is the choice.
Laser never worked for me. It even made me more destructed. I actually hate it.
The only laser I can stand is SIRT laser for training. :wink:

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I have both on a number of my firearms. If you choose to install a laser I’d advise the green. Green can be seen better in daylight, red can only be seen very close distance in daylight though ok at dark or indoors.
As others have said red dot optics has shown to get faster acquisition of target also both eyes are kept open. Most of the time for my EDC’s it’s a red dot optic. You can also choose a green dot optic from certain manufacturers.
Note: I’d have to mention not to go cheap on purchasing a red/green dot optic, remember if your putting it on a semi-auto handgun there’s a lot of slamming back and forth. Investigate different manufacturers and especially the glass that they install on their optics.
P.S. - The hours of operating time for the battery is also important, 50,000 hours and up is recommended.

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I have a couple of Romeo 5s on long guns and love them, they have what Sig calls MOTAC systems simply put if it sits still it shuts off as soon as you move it it turns on. One less thing to worry about in stressful situations. As for lasers I have a laser/light on a 92 I doubt I would use it like what was said prior I feel it just gives away your position but if I need it it is there. On a side note I have better than average night vision and night lights strategically placed around the house.

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Laser puts the dot on the target, so you can hold the firearm anywhere so long as you can shoot it safely. Target and those around it can see the dot.

Red dot require you to get your head aligned. No one can see the dot but the actor.

Completely different experiences.

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I would caution that people see colors differently — I find a tiny green dot very hard to find in almost any daylight environment I face, and have never been identified with any color discrimination deficit or abnormality. I find red much more easily.

In my experimentation (CT grip and rail), a projected visible light laser will be effective in diminished light only — indoors, night, dusk, heavy overcast or shadow. Better have a different plan for full daylight.

I expect to end up with a dot, but I’m not in the market for a new EDC right now. An adapter plate puts a dot sight too high for an iron backup. I’m not that good or confident with the dot, yet.

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Ok, the few have what I’ll say is color blindness. ( The few ).
As most of us know most firearms are built for right handed persons. The few South Paws, ( left handed persons ), have problems finding firearms which fit them. My wife is a South Paw so I have experience with this.
Back to seeing colors, the most can differentiate colors ok, we have to work with what the market puts out there and each individual chooses what works for themselves.

Can you explain this? I understand that ejection can be problematic, but fitment? I’m right handed but shoot much better left handed.

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@Brad, I meant the design, biuld of the firearms not fitment to the hand, sorry, I should have explained better.
Revolvers, the cylinder release on most is on the left side, semi-autos magazine release on the left and slide release on the left.
The percentage of firearms made is higher for the right handed people.
That’s all I was saying.

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I pick a red dot.

Pros include:

  • Single focal plane focus/aiming
  • More precise aiming point than irons
  • Better illumination than irons, grabs eye better
  • Allows very easy both eyes open ‘instinctive’ target focus
  • Gives shooter a competitive advantage

There is a reason competitions have separate divisions (and/or higher standards) for optics as opposed to irons.

I have no interest in lasers for a pistol for a number of reasons.

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Great point. Extremely useful if for some reason you cannot visually line up your sights.

I think that’s what I was trying to say. Just pointing out that committing to a choice can be costly, so figuring out what works is best done ahead of time (and using one’s own senses, rather than a vote of “most people”).

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all of my pistols have what i call on demand red lasers by on demand i mean they have a button on the trigger guard that the middle finger fits on and you can press to turn on and release to turn off,i have the pistols zeroed in at 25 yards and the laser is also zeroed in to the rear and front sight,so where the red laser points is where the round will go, I only have a red dot sight on me DP12 double barrel pump shotgun and also have a green lase on demand,like the idea of just pushing a button to turn it on and off,as for my long rifles I have the green on demand lasers on them and also have a clip on day/night thermal that can also be used as a monocular with one hand or on head gear,all of the long rifles scopes are zeroed to where the green light is,i dont use any lights,dont want any aiming points!

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Not even on a good day! lol

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