Range safety

RSOs can’t be everywhere, all the time. And sometimes new shooters just need some assistance. I had two new shooters in the next lane over from me recently. They just needed someone to help them with skills they didn’t have yet and to politely remind them of the basic safety rules. They gladly accepted my help. I could have packed up, complained to management and left. Instead I helped two people gain respect for firearms and a little more knowledge about how to use them safely and responsibly. If they had been belligerent, that would have been a different story. I guess each situation will be different, based on the people involved.

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Welcome @Mark542

You got it!

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How often do you think soldiers flag people with their rifles? All the time.

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Hence the term “friendly fire”!

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If you see an unsafe act at the range you may call a cease-fire. Everyone on the range is a safety officer when it comes to safety.
That should get their attention. Perhaps that will remedy the situation if enough people start calling cease-fires

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To pack up and leave the range would certainly be your choice for the situation. However to do this without bringing it to the violators attention would be less than proactive for that particular shooter and certainly for everyone else utilizing the range. Sometimes people don’t know, until they know. This could have been a very positive moment of instruction for this obviously new shooter. We should all be concerned with our own and everyone else’s safety, ensuring safe handling of any and all firearms are of utmost importance. Yes, calling a “cease fire” on the range may be embarrassing for the shooter and an inconvenience for everyone on the range but, everyone’s safety is of the utmost importance all the time. Most behavior is a learned issue so, try to be positive. Yes, mention the condition to the individual or group but, also report it to the RSO, owner and/or management. This could make you responsible for saving someone’s life along the way and making the shooting experience more pleasurable for everyone concerned and along the way…

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I seldom go to the indoor range and never on a weekend. We get a lot of tourists that are firearm restricted but want to shoot a firearm. They rent a pistol and buy some ammo and targets but have no clue what to do except what they saw in the movies. I have stopped a few of them from hurting themselves or others but it leaves me very nervous to be on the range with them. Consequently I only go if I absolutely need to and at off hours. I have a 20 punch card that is 5 years old and still has 8 punches to go. I usually go to the club outdoor range once a week. Being retired I can choose my times. Our shooting club has an outdoor facility with 4 smaller pistol bays and 1 large one. My wife and I usually have a pistol bay to ourselves. There are 12 firing positions on the 50/100 yard rifle range and I believe 8 on the 300 yard range. Major shotgun facility.

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Everyone on the range is a Range Safety Officer.
Never hesitate to call the cease fire and immediately notify the RSO. Once you call the cease fire, the RSO should immediately come over and solve the safety issue. If they don’t, find a new range.

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That’s how we did it in the Army.

My favorite indoor range is the one managed by my club.
I actually attend the meetings and know about the insurance and how much an accident would affect our dues.
Ours is a private club and members can bring guests, but are responsible.
There are cameras and they do look through them.
I will still speak up to the individuals. They are usually doing unsafe practices out of ignorance.
Guests must watch the safety video. Members are responsible to know the rules.
I do not want to lose my range, so I feel it is my responsibility to speak out.

I am certified as a Range Safety Officer(RSO), but the indoor range is a key card setup and an RSO is not required to be there. The club has been around for since the seventies. My first time shooting was at this range and I was a cub scout.
We have a pretty decent record when it comes to safety.
I want to keep it that way.

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I have seen the literally tens of thousands of holes in the ceiling at our indoor range. It was the bullet imprints I noticed on the ballistic barriers BETWEEN the stalls that gave me willies. As I approached the bench at the back wall, two unsupervised young ladies were handling their 'boyfriend’s weapons while he was on line. When tghey picked them up and were ‘pew pew pewing’ I got the hell outta there. That’s been three years ago. There are NO safe ranges IMO except the ones run by LEO.

Welcome @Jim146 , I often wonder how many holes have been punched in the sky at the outdoor ranges!

I was at the indoor range a couple of days ago and 2 young guys came in and started setting up to share a lane beside me. I casually noticed them taking their guns out at the firing line, 1 of them remained at the firing line and started shooting while the other took their bag to the back table. I honestly didn’t get my RADAR up until I heard one of the ROs telling the one at the back table that nothing comes in or out of the bag except at the firing line. The young guy tried to argue he was only loading magazines, but Kris let him know it didn’t matter what he was doing, it wasn’t happening at the back table. That’s why I choose the indoor range I go to - notice I know the ROs by name :+1:

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That situation is very concerning. You were right to step out and inform a Range Officer. I recommend this young woman get remedial training on the absolute importance of gun and range safety. Especially, trigger finger discipline.
Great topic for discussion.

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I respect your comments about this being a teaching opportunity. However, I am NOT about to approach a stranger with their finger on the trigger. My safety comes 1st and with todays ‘angry’ world I’ll let the RSO handle the confrontation over unsafe actions.

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