Range rules

Every range has different rules for people who use their range. Some require you to watch a safety video, some have a list of rules that you have to review with a Range Safety Officer, and others have the rules posted on the wall.

What does your favorite range require the first time someone shoots there? Do you think one way of conveying rules is more useful than others?

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I prefer shooting in safe areas on public land to going to the range for several reasons. I have had many jobs though that require communicating safety and other rules to the public and/or employees.

The one thing I can say with certainty is that signage rarely works. Most people ignore the signs believing they know everything they need to or they think the rules are for other people. Same with signed release forms. Most people don’t read them at all or glance over them at best.

The only signs I have ever seen have some positive affect are the large bold ones that use very entertaining cartoon style images that are designed to get the top few most important points across. It is usually most affective to assume everyone who you don’t already know is clueless and to communicate the rules with them in person in an engaging and none pedantic way. They may not listen but at least you will be able to see that and know that they likely need to be watched closely.

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Indoor range: watch a video then sign form stating your will follow their rules and directives of the range safety officer. Your name and date you signed are in their computerized cash register system so they can check every other time you use the range.

Outdoor range: read their rules on a digital device and sign that you will follow them and obey the range safety officer.

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New or not, indoor range requires everyone to read range rules.

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Read the range rules, and sign a waiver that you have read and understand them.

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My 2 local indoor Ranges have “Range Rules” that has be read and “waiver” to be signed.
Waiver has to be re-signed every 6 months.

I use outdoor Range for classes only with people I know and trust. However - still signature under “Waiver” and “Safety Rules” is required every single time.

I like that “4 Rules of Firearm Safety” are posted on every wall in every room at my indoor ranges.

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I agree @Jerzy. Range rules and a waiver at the 2 I use.

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Well, we have a different way of dealing with rules here.

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Our range is basically for private club use.
Only folks who have had a USCCA course are permitted to enter.
Exceptions are made for current Military, Vets, and family/friends of any of the above.

Range rules are taught in class, and everyone understands them.
We’ve never had to ask anyone to leave.

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I need to find a good rifle range. I found out today the one I planned to try only allows frangible rounds.

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Pass a NICS background check

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New users have the range rules read and reviewed with them. If a total newbie, and not just new to the range, RSO accompanies them to get setup and fire a few live rounds.

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Our club has all new members, regardless of experience, attend a 2 hour orientation and sign a waiver.
This covers everything except Rifle Range.
Those wishing access to Rifle Range attend another orientation, take a test, sign a waiver, and are issued an additional card with gate code.
Any rifle member found allowing another member without rifle cert onto the range without prior approval of Range Manager or Chief Instructor is subject to disciplinary action.

Basic and Safety rules are also posted on numerous permanent signage locations.

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If training doesn’t include a competency test of the basic course objectives, it is just a CYA drill (if free) or a scam (if fee based). For me, a 2 hr course covering firearms safety, range etiquette, and safe firearms handling for the types of firearms authorized for use by the completion of the course is the minimum standard. In a “range card” class for a pistol-rifle-shotgun facility, each participant should demonstrate safe weapons handling fundamentals with a revolver, a semi-auto pistol, a pump, bolt action, lever action, breach loading, and mag fed semi-auto long gun. This course, or an “update” version, should be done annually. Then, each trip to the range begins with a safety briefing. That brief (no more than 5 minutes long), repeats the basic rules to get folks to thinking gun safety and range etiquette. This can be done with a video, a couple of signs, etc., but needs to be led orally by an RSO on duty. During this brief interaction, the RSO is looking for clear signs of agitation or impairment.

That is what I believe all shooting facilities should be providing their paying customers. But it seems to me that very few are.

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My favorite range, the only range within reasonable distance, requires that I park my car in the lot and carry my head to a shooting station. This is a n outdoor range on state wildlife management land with the physical structures being maintained by a local Sportsman’s club. There is a large sign outlining the state rules concerning prohibited weapon, ammo, and target types along with hours of operation and such.

That’s it. In three years, I am unaware of any accident more serious than “slide bite.”

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