Follow Up Shot Mistake

I was at the range today and switched between a 9mm and 45. I was working on rapid fire (something I don’t get enough of these days). On one mag with the 45, I messed up trigger reset and brought the finger back a little too early and got a way off target follow up shot.

Any thoughts?

I think it was switching between light recoil of the 9mm, I didn’t give the 45 enough time to get back on target.

I guess I just need to keep training, but it was kind of a bummer for me. I hate to make mistakes like that. It makes me want to go to the range more, but that’s hard to do these days with ammo being so pricey.

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It’s about aim not speed. Slow it down before tearing it up

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@Scoutbob this can happen to anyone because when you are working on rapid fire drills you are rushing your shots. Slow it down a little and more pointing than aiming. Remember you were rapid firing and reset position is harder to pick up. I don’t know if it makes sense but shoot quicker instead of faster.:+1::+1:

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You flinched, anticipating the recoil. Smooth is fast. Slow it down a little. In a gunfight, it’s not the fastest draw, it’s the fastest one to hit the target.

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Call me crazy, but I rarely shoot from the reset.

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Appreciate the feedback y’all. I’ll slow it down :+1:.

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This may actually be smart. There’s a difference between competition shooting and defensive shooting. I want to get all my rounds quickly on target, but I also would rather all shots taken hit the target and expand, and no shots miss. That’s better than most shots hitting, but multiple stray bullets hitting the wrong people.

I remember reading on police training and shooting fast, but then I’ve also heard that police miss tons of shots and conceal carriers usually don’t. I almost wonder if that plays a part :thinking:.

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I like this.

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“Dress me slowly, I’m in a hurry…”
Napoleon Bonaparte

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And do not forget… everybody has a phone and a video recording of everything…

If you fire from reset and fire too quickly, and the threat was stopped… some prosecutors may attempt to charge you… for that last shot… after the threat was ended.

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Our ranges don’t allow it, so I wish I could help!

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I may be new to the game, but I think I can use past experience to this situation to apply for both accuracies and speed.

• back in the day before general public had access to electronic typewriters, manual typewriters were commonplace. High school training, beyond the basics to teach above 40 words/min, used a tape-recorder playing “torture music” (ya gotta love the ol’ days) with great emphasis on song using this reg-u-lar-slow-loud-beat-for-the-dur-a-tion.
• once the fingers gained strength and mind correlation allowed “auto fingers”, it’s just a matter of slowly speeding up the tune of the song. We were never allowed to type out of step w/ beat of song speed…no matter how accurate student claimed or was indeed accurate.

• what’s that song in my head & how does it go? Rythum of the Night.

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Just like others have said, slow down! but also, you have gained step one. That is to say you have recognized a problem and now the answer is, practice. that is why we train to learn and to improve. Another thing to look at is, What was your grip like? I am sure as others have suggested is your finger set on the trigger tied in with the recoil.
Do not stress about making a mistake at the range because that is why we go to the range is to learn. Better to fix your mistakes there than to perform them in a self-defense situation.

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Yeah my range will have none of that! I haven’t had a chance to double tap or rapid fire since I had the pleasure of shooting outdoors! And we are approaching 2 years on that sadly! :triumph::grimacing::pensive:

I like shooting outdoors & I miss doing that. I don’t wanna blow away 3 or 4 boxes of ammo like I used to, but I might if I find a safe place to do so.

:v:t5:

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Yeah, my local range has two options, traditional ranges with one shot every two seconds, but they also have private lanes where you can shoot rifles, practice drawing and rapid fire. It’s a really nice place. They also watch and make sure everyone’s being safe (I’ve been in ranges not watched as close and it makes me nervous with new shooters).

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I think my grip was okay, I have recently changed my grip, I am taking my thumb off the gun because I was having failures to lock back. I think I was using that thumb too much to help me hold the gun (something I found out is really unnecessary). I’m still working to get that grip to be more comfortable. It’s been a good change though, I’ve had zero failures to lock back since.

Thank you for that. I agree, the mistake just gives me something to work on. That’s why I’m there in the first place.

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Switching platforms when going for speed is never a really good idea. On days I run different platforms I always finish up with my EDC and rebuild the training from slow to go fast to override the previous trigger experiences. I know if I go from my 1911 to say the SA XD and start out fast I will lock the SA up several times until I get it figured out, hence I always finish up with the 1911 just to re-tune for business. I can go from my Ruger MK-II in 22LR to the 1911 but they are both single actions with similar trigger weights an resets, throw in a revolver or a striker or DA/SA and I’ve got to think about it. Always finish up with what you are going to carry.

Cheers,

Craig6

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Pretty much what @Craig6 said. It’s kind of the reason I don’t have any pistols in anything other than .45. I have worked for years to get that to feel right and do what I want, when I want it.

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Others have said, “They do not cross train.” I say, train well with your every day carry weapon and shoot other guns too. I have three .45s and each one shoots different. One of them has a light trigger pull, works great on speed shooting. Today I will carry my 9 mm next week I will carry my .45 Springfield, then I will train with my Kimber .45.
The reason I say that is when you train, you train for form and technique and if you can improve your form and technique by finding different drills. These drills will challenge you on your form and technique and it will show you where you are weak. Basic skills transfer from gun to gun.

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Thanks again everyone. I went back to the range today and worked on my follow up shots. I went through more ammo than I wanted to, but I felt it was necessary to build confidence with my carry gun.

No issues. Just shot, got back on target and shot again.

I was also able to practice malfunctions with my snap caps too. It was a great range trip, it’s been a long while since I was able to shoot over a 100 rounds through my carry gun, working on rapid fire and malfunctions (the private suites and ammo are expensive).

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