Do you rack the slide every time you insert a loaded magazine into your pistol?

For my every day carry my routine is: Remove unloaded firearm from safe; check it’s clear and insert it in holster. Practice presentation 2 or 3 times, Check clear and set it down. Take spare empty magazine into ammo room and insert one round. Return to gun safe, insert mag into firearm and rack slide (putting round into chamber) and remove the now empty mag. Holster firearm. Return empty mag to gun safe and retrieve one fully loaded mag. Insert loaded mag into holstered firearm (admin. reload). Retrieve and secure full back up magazine(s) as needed.

When securing firearm at end of day I eject the chambered round and place it in an empty ammo holder with approx. half a box of identical rounds. A rotate through these each cycle (as described above) to preclude chambering the same round over and over. I measure the length of these rounds every couple of months…if any are approaching minimum length I set them aside for range use. I return loaded mag(s) to the ammo room. Finally, check firearm is clear, give it a quick wipe with a silicone cloth, and return it to the safe.

After a few days it is not as tedious as it sounds, and it provides a little extra security for handling firearms at home.

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That is a lot of steps.

I’d worry that I’d end up carrying 0+1 at some point, holstering the gun without a mag. Once upon a time I spent a day carrying an unloaded gun without realizing so maybe I’m extra sensitive to that

Do you keep a separate gun staged for home defense?

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I always keep a round in the chamber. So, unless I extract a magazine to top it off, yes, I will rack it, drop the magazine and add one more round to it.

If you should find yourself in a situation where you need to use yuor firearm, most likely you will be under stress and having to rack the gun to chamber a round not only takes time but it also can add the possibility of a jam. I dont want to induce any un-needed chances of a jam.

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No, if needed I release slide after loading

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The smiley was supposed to be flagging my facetious comment.

Although when I read an apparently serious description of doing a press check in the dark during a home invasion, I guess I really don’t know what all people might be up to.

Sorry for the confusion.

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I’ll have to take your word for it, altho I’m inclined to @Nathan57’s concern about inducing a problem rather than precluding one.

My routine is:
• Remove holstered EDC from storage and put it on my belt.
• When securing at end of day I remove the holstered firearm from my belt and put it in storage.

If in a holster, it’s loaded and ready to go. If loaded and ready to go, it’s in a holster (or in use).
No variation. Only time I check the condition (i.e. loaded or clear) is during transitions — starting and ending practice or maintenance, basically.

I do unload regularly — but for practice sessions, not for parking. If I was able to present during last night’s or this morning’s dry fire, I will be able to present this afternoon without more confirmation. The only setup check I do is to verify holster and cover garments are organized properly, I check defensive ammo for setback first time I handle a gun each month.

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Whatever you decide is ultimately up to you. Having multiple steps makes you think about what you are doing. A routine is good, but not a mindless one. I do have firearms staged for home defense, and of course a routine of periodic cleaning and maintenance.

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Sounds like a sound routine to me.

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I tend to think that the more complex a process is, and the more steps it has, the more opportunities there are for a mistake.

I do what techs said. Loaded handguns only go in a holster (or in my hand), and all handguns in a holster (unless slide is locked open) are loaded.

Entire holster with loaded gun in it comes off the belt/on the belt and into/out of the safe as a unit. Simple, quick, fewer chances to make a mistake, no rechambering the same round(s)

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Welcome to the Community @Carol25. We are happy to have you.

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Welcome to the family @Carol25 and you are in the right place at the right time.

Welcome to the family @TheNomad and God bless you.

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Thank you @Johnnyq60 ! Have a wonderful weekend and god bless you as well. :+1:t3::us:

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No i do not rack the slide, i leave one in the chamber so there is no need to rack the slide, many years ago i was trained on the 1911 45acp to shoot 7 out of 8 and strip the magazine leaving one in the chamber. I also do this on all my guns that have slide’s it just a little less noise when changing the magazine. Stay Alert Don’t Get Hurt :cowboy_hat_face::cactus::us::sun_with_face::desert::dart::us_outlying_islands::+1:

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When reloading from empty/safe, I lock the slide, drop one round into the chamber, visually verify it is fully seated, release the slide, decock, and insert a fully loaded magazine. My firearm is DA/SA, decocker only. I only use new ammo, never reloads.

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Dropping one directly into the chamber is not a sound practice. Can lead to extractor/extraction problems. Put one round in a spare mag, insert it into your firearm, rack the slide, replace now empty mag with full mag (or perhaps better, a full mag -1 round to prevent over-tensioning the mag).

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That is what I do as well. One can damage the extractor otherwise. Chamber one from a magazine and then top off the mag.

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After my mag is empty and the slide is open I press release and slap in a new mag and push release with my thumb and I’m good to go. And with a well maintained firearm it’s running like a new Cadillac! Now tell me why that is wrong. Thanks, Bobby Jean Back the Blue.

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This is what I teach my wife when the gun is empty and the slide is locked open she drops the empty mag and slaps a new one in and then she uses her thumb to chamber it because she cannot pull back the slide. At least, she can pull the trigger and she’s my backup. And I hope I never need her like that. PS Just in case. God Bless and Happy thanksgiving. Thank you for your service. Bobby Jean and Debbie Ann

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Roger that sir. Thank you very much.

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