Your Take on Smart Guns?

If a “democrat” proposes it, then I want nothing to do with it.

Edited to meeting Community Guidelines. ~Dawn

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The technology is very new. Right now, only a few companies make such a gun - and only in 22 LR. Let Joe Biden’s security team start carrying them. When they do, so will I. I’ve got a feeling it’s gonna be a long wait before that happens.

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My take? NO! NEVER! NO WAY NO HOW!

OH…Smart Guns? You want to know my take on SMERT GUNS?
There are no such things as SMART GUNS. Only SMART PEOPLE, and they would never fall for that government BS!

Edited to meet Community Guidelines. ~Dawn

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Please remember, name calling is not allowed about anyone who is in the Community or outside of the Community. If you have any questions, please review the Community Guidelines.

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uuuuuuuuhhhhhhmmmmmm NO!

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M56 Smart Gun
Yes. PLEASE.

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What would prevent RFID tracking? That would include automatic registry with heavy use of biometrics. Cars, airplanes and even pacemakers have been hacked. Taking it one step further, what would prevent a country like China from a DOS of all weapons systems? Just sayin…

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Heck, they would probably be made in China…

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Rfid blocking holsters :laughing:

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No thank you

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Not very smart. :slight_smile:

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I mean, I wouldn’t be for any sort of gun control that puts it in the hands of someone else especially the government. I feel Red Flag laws have their foot in the door due to our current restrictions on Felons and the optics of “gun violence” before the riots. He also has basically called for another assault weapon ban so I think he’s just trying to be a politician and win by any means necessary.

Now high tech guns? I’m down for something like a personal rail gun or some other high tech weaponry. Lord knows the fording fathers didn’t give a damn what weapon a citizen owned just that it wasn’t stolen from another citizen. The high tech gun designs in games like Cyberpunk 2077 which I’m looking forward to are mostly what I have in mind for good high tech guns.

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If all firearms went to “smart”, I’d be stuck with what I own; technology would have to be perfected, I seriously doubt there’s anything available that could take all the torture tests firearms go through and consistently be dependable.
Regardless, I don’t care for the ideal.

LOL ! Respectfully, totally agree !
(Sorry, thought I was replying to “CCP approves this…”)

I might be totally off base here, but I thought powder lots were already “tagged” in some manner; hardly like getting the rifling off are bullet, but would be an investigative start.

You can identify powder manufacturers, but I’m not aware that specific batches have identifiable markers in them. That just seems overly inefficient and therefore costly so therefore NOT what they’d like to do to increase revenue.

This is an old story, but it discusses that, and here, and here. I only did a quick search, and did also find information on identifying manufacturers, but what I found stated it is not comprehensive. “[W]hile the database has been expanded by the project, the researchers noted that the current database is only a “snapshot” because the manufacturers and types of powders on the market are continually changing.” However, as this report (.pdf) states while the database has been expanded by the project, the researchers noted that the current database is only a “snapshot” because the manufacturers and types of powders on the market are continually changing.) states, it is only for unburned powder.

A “Smart Gun” operated by a human is an oxymoron

Maybe Alexa can help me aim better??

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We have a vending system at work in the break room you take your selection scan it then use your finger to pay for it. Takes at least 5 times to get a scan. So no thanks.

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Somewhat relevant to this (now old) conversation, this stat was given almost as a throw-away while watching Colion Noir on the Joe Rogan podcast.

Maryland had a program running for 15years, spent $5 Million, and solved exactly zero cases. They created a “fingerprint” for every firearm purchased in the state by firing one shot and keeping the case. The hope was that a firearm could be matched based on cases found at a crime scene. This is effectively “microstamping”, like what is required in California (not sure if other states).

In theory, the “fingerprinting” system is sound science. Scratches are etched onto a casing which enables them to be matched to the weapon that fired the shot. The program was expanded from a limited, but successful National Ballistics database which only collected casings from crime scenes.

Throughout its run, the Maryland database helped investigators a total of 26 times, but with each case, they already knew which gun was in question, state police officials said.

Sources: