When holstering your handgun do you look/glance at the holster?

My opinion: Telling people they don’t practice enough if they choose to look is part of the problem. IMO, creating this idea that more highly trained/experienced/capable people don’t look is doing a disservice in that it pushes some people to not look which is objectively less safe.

Seeing your finger and the trigger and the holster and your clothing, and seeing that everything is where it is supposed to be, even if you just got out of a fight for your life, is useful no matter how many times you have practiced it.

Things might not be where they were at the start.

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It is about muscle memory. I know what my trigger and muzzle is doing when it is in my hand, I do not have to look at it. I have been through numerous training courses with many of the legends in the industry and have never been trained to look at my holster which I can’t see in the first place because of its location on my belt. It has been working for me for over 50 years of shooting but I train and shot competitively for years. I can safely handle my weapons in the dark with blinders on if I need to. If your gun handling skills are not up to snuff and you feel that you need to look, then maybe you have a point. I am not saying that it is for everybody but the question was what do I do.

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yeap…
This guys :point_down: was trained to safely recover pistol into AIWB hostler… he even looked at it… but did he really do this ?
Thousands hours of training never give the same confidence as good look at the thing :wink:

You may be OK with not looking. I’m not negating this. But telling this :

if you have to look, you aren’t practicing enough

it’s not fair for other members. We are not cowboys, we are responsible people, doing responsible things.

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This is hardly about being cowboys which was never mentioned by me. More training is always good and always the responsible thing to do and the responsible thing to suggest.

We have two different approaches to reholstering habit.
Like I mentioned, personal preference and choice. And I’m OK with this.

I just couldn’t understand the statement about not practicing enough.
Anyway, as Instructor I would never teach students to blindly reholster.
The first rule of rehostering → you do this when the threat is over. So why not to look at the holster?

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So much wrong with these statements. I’d like to suggest some companion advice:

If you have to check the chamber before cleaning your gun, your knowledge about the immediate state of your firearm is lacking.

Seriously, this is marginally reckless to suggest as much, that your skills are lacking if you have to look your gun into its holster, especially when there are new gun owners here who might read your comments and adopt them as some goal they should achieve. I completely agree with @Nathan57, telling people this is part of the problem.

And note to anyone who took my companion “advice” seriously, never, never, never, ever clean your firearm without checking the chamber for a live round first!

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Sorry but your companion advice is not applicable and not related. The question is how do I do it. The question was answered. I can’t even see my holster when it is on. You have completely ignored that fact.

Answering the question of how you do it is one thing. Saying that people who look need more training/practice is a different thing.

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Okay, I will go along with that. But training is always a good thing.

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I’ve ignored nothing. My reply wasn’t what you do; it was about you essentially denigrating others as unskilled, as “not up to snuff,” or as lacking in training if they feel the need, or opt as a safer alternative, to look when holstering.

My (entirely sarcastic) companion advice was intended to point out how dangerous your own is in suggesting not looking as a goal of training. Sorry you missed the point.

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I guess that we just have to agree to disagree.

That’s certainly the easy out.

I gotta say — I can’t tell from this clip what the guy’s problem actually was, but I don’t think it helped to make your point @Jerzy. Clearly, he “carefully looked his gun into the holster” just as he was taught in Gunz 101, and it did not help him a single bit. I would say the takeaways from this mishap are:

  1. learn to pick suitable gear;
  2. learn how that gear is properly used; and
  3. learn how to safely unholster and reholster your gun with or without the use of visual cues.

This shooter seemed attentive and methodical at every step as he put his pistol away — not rushed or casual at any point. Looking at the thing is not enough, knowing how to do the thing is what counts.

It is also possible to shoot oneself on the draw with poor equipment and/or poor technique — but I don’t hear anyone insisting to look the gun out of the holster as the only safe practice.

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Actually that was my point. He looked at the holster… but looking doesn’t mean the same as be sure it’s safe.
People train their habits, but muscle memory is not the only thing that comes from that training.
We are not machines to do everything exactly the same way every time.
In this particular case we are talking about - looking your firearm - it is not just looking, but without looking we are not able to determine if holstering is safe or not.
So we do not look at the holster to see where it is, we are looking at it to be sure it is clear from anything that could create problems.
Each person have something between the ears to be used every time. Yes - both eyes and the “thing” located just behind the eyes. :wink:

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IMHO it is possible that if you practice enough the technique of holstering without looking you can become good at it and it will become muscle memory. But as @Jerzy posted video shows that man being careful and holstering slowly that mistakes can still happen. He looked as he was re-holstering and the gun went off while he was bending over. My point is that no matter how much you train bad things can happen. Go with what you are comfortable with, whether it’s looking or not looking when you re-holster. When I’m at home standing in front of a mirror I practice holstering with both techniques and have gotten better with both.

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I’m wondering if something from his wardrobe didn’t get trapped into his AIWB holster in between the trigger and the holster itself? Otherwise, it’s odd to me that this discharge didn’t happen immediately upon holstering. :thinking: After all, that was supposed to be the intent of this thread.

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It’s a possibility that an article of his clothing did get caught in the trigger. I wonder what type of gun it was. I don’t know.

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That has always been my best guess when watching that video. And within that, what jerzy is saying, ‘going through the motions’, and not actually seeing while looking. Like the guys at the range who turn their head side to side after firing, but aren’t really looking at anything, they just turn for the sake of turning without really seeing. Some, you can tell, are actually looking, looking at people, looking at your hands, good habit to have.

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Glock. :smiling_imp:
Really, I’m not kidding right now…
That video was analysed by Kevin M. some time ago.

But whatever reason of that discharge was, I wanted to show that even trained habit may fail. If we can do such mistake with looking at the holster, there’s a bigger chance for mistakes without looking at all.
Training makes us better but thinking helps survive.

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Does “overthinking” count? :wink:

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