What would you do: Car accident

The bloggers for the USCCA are on the same wavelength as the Community :wink:

Check out Dick Blanchet’s latest blog post about securing your firearm in an emergency situation:

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They seem to do that a LOT… hmmm… :thinking:

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An emergency room nurse attended one of my concealed carry classes. When I covered that hospitals are off-limits in Illinois, a student asked about what if they were unconscious. The nurse informed us that either a LEO or Hospital Security will collect it and put in a lock box in a secured area of the hospital until the patient is discharged.

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If I have to be transported to a hospital I know I will have to relinquish my firearm. I would ask for a police officer, and get his name and badge number on a receipt for my weapon. What other choice do I have? If I have to give it up, I feel my best bet is to let an officer take it.

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Let the EMT know so they can secure the pistol or gun until the police arrive.

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Inform emergency personnel so they can remove it and safely store it. Other then that. I had to go to the hospital after a accident but was taken by a friend from the scene. When I got there I still had on my side arm. They asked me to remove my clothes and into a lovely gown. When they came in to the room I had told them my side arm was on top of my clothing and sorry. They looked over at my 1911 and 2 mags. Then at my S&W shield and 2 mags. The nurse laughed and asked where the ear was starting and nicely locked them up. My bad!:us::us::grin::grin::us::us:

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We talk about how for some people everything goes into slow motion in an emergency.

I saw her coming a mile away and was thinking, “Damn they need to slow down”.

It was a combination of hills and rolling prairie in that area near Limon and we ended up on opposite sides of a rise meeting at the top.

50yds away I could see she was all the way over on my side of the road and could see her eyes looking down at her phone and I was thinking, Look up damnit, look up!

She didn’t and all I could think of as she closed the final distance was to close my eyes and turn my head to protect my face from the glass and the airbag.

Didn’t realize how badly I was in shock for a few minutes but I remember looking out my broken widow seeing my mirror gone and thinking, “Damn she broke my mirror”, I then looked in my rear view just in time to see her car hitting the ground 153’ from where she impacted me. It was upside down when it came in contact and rolled three times, two end over end and one right over left and came to rest pointing in the opposite line from travel partially on the driver’s side and partially on the roof.

Stuff like that seems somewhat surreal later but it’s how time dilation works.

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Yep, You can’t have the requisite intent if you are injured/unconscious to be liable.

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@WildRose. Wow Charles that is some tragedy. I’m really sorry that ever happened to you. I had an accident many years ago in 1979 that was a head on type that the day that particular day was very very sunny and a big truck, semi-truck I believe that it’s termed Bomber Truck crossed to my oncoming lane and he hit me head on and I never saw it ever. This was when there was no seat belt laws because back in the day there was lap belts and people didn’t use them; back then seat seat belts had a tendency to crawl under the seats because of non-usage. I’m 69, and seriously with all the serious things that have happened in my life I don’t believe sometimes I still on the top side of the ground. Well, my car was a total loss, looked like a pretzel that had a midlife crisis, I went through the windshield after I broke the steering wheel. Spent 7 weeks in the hospital and had brain surgery (yes the surgeon actually found it) ; back then insurance companies actually cared about people and wasn’t interested in kicking people out the next day or so. Lots of younger people wouldn’t remember those times back then. So there it is, I am happy you are here.

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As a paramedic I would greatly appreciate you letting me know as soon as is practical. If your unconscious we will find it, so hopefully it’s in a quality holster. I would either remove it and hand it off to the officer or have the officer remove it. If you are conscious, I would still prefer to remove it. Not because I think you’re dangerous but because I’ve seen how quickly someone can become violent due to a head injury and never remember it happening.

I applaud those carrying Med kits. Thank you Dawn for putting this idea out there. I hope no one is ever in this situation, but if so please inform emergency personnel and allow them to dictate removal. Most likely they will have a policy in place for such an event.

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Let the emergancy responders know im a licensed consealed carry and that i have my fire arm on my person.

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Welcome to the group @Kristie and @Andrew29. :slightly_smiling_face:

@Andrew29 thank you for sharing your experience. Do you think its different for an EMT who is not firearms-trained?

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I use it to keep Predators away until help arrives.

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@Maceperry,
If you are unconscious, Predators are gonna eat you alive…

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If I’m lucky I won’t wake up in the middle of their dinner.

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I am familiar with the area and can’t imagine how your mind was whirling while you watched the approach. Glad you are ok from that encounter.

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Honestly while a very interesting incident it wasn’t all that bad as I was able to walk away from it temporarily blinded in one eye, looking like I’d been sand blasted from the collar up on one side of my face and with a broken hand.

I made a couple of friends for life out of acquaintances who came to my rescue since I was camped forty miles from town with three horses and 18 dogs and was totally without any ability to care for them due to a lack of transportation.

Certainly taught me a valuable lesson about texting and driving too.

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I would immediately put my gun in the lock box next to me and they would have to cut it out witout the key , my wife will retrieve it for me, we have that in our training plans.

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Wow Charles that’s very interesting, we’re all very much happy you are doing well now.

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If able, I hope I would tell EMTs about the firearm. If not, let them figure it out while they are going through my wallet and find my CPL.
Of course, if I happen to be near the USCCA headquarters, I would simply tell first responders to call Dawn and have her come and take my firearm.:wink:

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