Weaver vs Isosceles

Isosceles. For me its better gun handling, quicker follow up shots, have found tighter groups. Weaver stance it allows me to get relaxed and not have the control like I have on isosceles.

2 Likes

Welcome @Daniel1!

I’ve seen @KevinM demonstrate with a belt and the heel of the shoe - definitely a good thing to know how to do.

2 Likes

Hook the rear sight over your belt, sole of your boot, edge of a table, edge of a holster or other firm location and, making sure you have enough room, shove down hard and fast. This should load a round into the chamber.

4 Likes

This is a good question, for myself ive never been taught really how to correctly shoot. I had to learn it myself from the internet and luckly my ccw class i took was very informational. Ive tried both and cannot tell the difference. I will say shooting isosceles feels more comforable when shooting at the range.

2 Likes

Use the one that you train with. But both Weaver and Isosceles have a fatal flaw. You are standing still. Over 80% of police officer who won a gun fight MOVED during the fight. Moving toward cover or concealment or just getting out of the line of attack give you a better chance of continuing to live.

2 Likes

Very, very true, @Ralph1! The unfortunate thing about training at a range is you’re not able to move too much usually. Movement should be one of your priorities in your self-defense.

1 Like

Modified Weaver. Years of martial arts with a basic stance of strong foot back, plus 6 months of academy training in a field interview stance has ingrained that into my muscle memory. I also like the fact that if you carry on your strong side at 3 or 4 o’clock, this puts your weapon away from the threat if you haven’t drawn yet.

2 Likes

I’ve had years of martial arts training, but no academy training, @Shepherd. When I did the Proving Ground two years ago I went to an Isosceles stance, even after all of my training. I was really surprised at that.

1 Like

@Dawn, What is your basic stance for martial arts? Mine was a very low stance, with most of one’s weight on the back (strong) foot and the weak foot forward with minimal weight on it. My natural reaction to any use of force situation I encountered on duty, even if I wasn’t in a field interview stance was to assume my martial arts stance. If I was in an field interview stance I just lowered my center of gravity with out thinking.

1 Like

I had a similar stance, right foot back, low, left arm slightly forward of the right. We called it walking stance or geodneun jase. (Tae Kwon Do)

1 Like

I can’t explain why I revert to that, other than thinking it is muscle memory, or that it was years of fighting that way, but it’s what I do. I totally agree with you that people who revert to a full face stance in a confrontation should shoot Isosceles, but in countless encounters I’ve always bladed myself away so will probably always shoot modified Weaver. I’ve trained Isosceles and can shoot just as well that way, but naturally revert back to a modified Weaver.

2 Likes

And in a self-defense situation, I hope we all remember to move to cover as quickly as possible. We definitely won’t have extra time to say, wait, I need to be in XYZ stance before I can shoot.

2 Likes

Exactly! I should have stated that I was thinking up close encounters with limited distance between the two individuals. Naturally, if there is a good distance separating the two, then it is a move to cover situation while engaging. The “dashcam” description in the article put me in mind of either traffic stops or interviewing someone on the street or a public area where you have gotten close to them.

2 Likes

One thing we don’t always consider when we talk about the “best stance” is the fact that we won’t have that time to get into a stance and adjust to have a perfect shot on target. We’ll have to shoot from whatever position we’re in. Training to address the aggressor with a good sight picture will be more important that your stance. And train to move to cover!

2 Likes

Believing in the “train how you will fight” idea. Being a martial artist I tend to step into a modified weaver stance, kind of a “front stance” sideways angle from the assailant. So I do shoot mostly from this position but also shift to isosceles and weak leg forward as well. My thoughts are you never know what “stance” you will be able to step into in a breath sometimes. Be ready from any position. Just my half a cent. :slight_smile:

5 Likes

Very true! And that may include moving. Wish my range allowed move and shoot. Does the one you shoot at allow it, @Michael13?

2 Likes

Yeah to move and shoot I have to go to the gun club with outdoor range.

Unfortunately it’s been in the 115° range, so that’s out. Do you know how hot metal target stands get in 115°+ heat?

1 Like

The range doesn’t but I have a relative that has a range on some property. I learn so much from him, Army vet/sniper & sniper trainer. There is where I can move and fire.
At the range I shoot at it is pretty standard. Stand in your block and fire down range.

2 Likes

I’m cross dominant and find it faster to get sights on target with a Weaver stance.

Mike

3 Likes

That’s not surprising to me, @Michael1. Do you train in multiple stances so that you’re prepared if you have to shoot for a different position?

1 Like