Weapon light or compensator?

So, if you had to worry about ranges where the firearm being pushed out of battery, would you run a weapon light or compensator? Made my choice but could be an interesting conversation.

Not sure the question here.

If I’m in a position where my opponent has the opportunity to push my weapon out of battery, I would not give two $#!+s about any accessories on the gun. I’d care more about;

A: maintaining control of my gun

B: what other weapons can I use and how to regain full control over the situation. (Knee to the guts, elbow to the chin, leg sweep and take it to the ground? Off hand knife?)

C: creating distance because obviously they got to close initially!

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Pushed out by you or a malfunction?

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I hate going to ranges that push my firearm out of battery. find a new range

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I currently opt for the flashlight route. While it wont help as much with recoil mitigation as the comp does, most modern holsters are not setup for muzzle comps yet unfortunately. There are other manufacturers that offer other options for muzzle standoff devices as well. The other side to think about on the Comp, as with ones like radian’s ramjet, if you are point shooting that into someone’s torso at muzzle press ranges, the muzzle blast from that comp is coming straight up under your face.

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Two assumptions that come into play here…

1.that there will always be a choice in disengaging. And that you can control every scenario. How often do you park in clear lane and end up with people no ill intent have now parked all around you? If I was single, I wouldn’t even bother carrying. Now, there is a very real scenario, that I may have to work way closer than I want.

  1. So many arguments are predicated as force on force as opposed to force on mutt. If I’m in a gun fight with someone who is trained on fighting when I pull and rotate up on the hip and jam it in the body cavity then I picked the fight and I picked the wrong opponent.
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Thank you RangeMatt. That is great information.

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The assumption is that my fiancé and I are forced into scenario in a parking lot where pulling back would put me in a lane where it is completely linear and she would be directly in the firing lane. So my option would be to wait and hope for a longer shot at a smaller area or close the distance and jam the muzzle into the targets body cavity.

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do you train with your fiance? if she does not carry, has she practiced down drills? IE, theres a threat, you yell “down” or “move” or whatever trigger word you want to use, she gets the f out of the way?

proofmark’s MSOD is one of the most popular from what i understand. they will still require specific holsters though.

Proof Mark (proofmarkllc.com)

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We’re working our way past decades of abuse, neglect and malnutrition so it comes down to she links her arm through my off arm, she’s always on my off side in public and she understands that if it goes down she’s gonna get thrown around. She’s gonna get yanked into me when I draw and then get pushed to the ground at some point.

Fortunately, we have three decades of history so she understands that I’m not doing that to her for the sake of being rough, it’s necessary in that situation.

I am taking her through the beginning of firearms training to prep her to go into classes and have a baseline to understand.

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Excellent Point. Do we train with our partners, Wife, Kids, Parents…? Do they know what to expect, what to do?
R and I talk about it and occasionally, on the street , practice it verbally, “What’s that guy doing?” “There’s some good cover.” “Don’t go over there that’s a dead end.” “Trade me sides.”. But we have never practiced it physically.

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just like fire drills and home evacuation drills, this kind of stuff is NOT intuitive to most people, so it needs to be gone over with significant others, children, and whoever else you are around on a regular basis that knows you carry. They need to know what to expect, and not just from a conversational standpoint. It honestly amazes me in today’s society how many people don’t recognize gunfire by sound and how long it takes it to register in people’s minds.

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This is the only gun control I’m in favor of!

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While the muzzle getting jammed into the attacker’s body in a struggle is a possibility I wouldn’t intentionally try to do this. Just too many things that can go wrong with the weapon against the attackers body even if it has a light or muzzle device to help keep it from going out of battery.

Based on my limited martial arts training and practice I want to keep the muzzle as far out of reach from an attacker as possible. Sometimes that means not going for my firearm until I can use both my hands to help create space and time to draw or get away and other times it may mean using my elbows, shoulders, head, knees and feet to keep my pistol under my control until I can make an opening to take a shot.

I really like the C.A.R. “High” position for getting a shot off on an attacker that is within a couple feet or closer. It limits the angles the attacker can get to my pistol and allows me to use my shoulder, elbow or head to create space and take a quick shot if needed.

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My EDC does not have either compensator or flashlight. My combat weapon has a compensator on it. Saying that there is CQ or CC training for such situations a person might encounter.

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That is a perfect world theory based on force on force not force on mutt. If that’s your call, I won’t berate you for it. But this is a snap shot of why I take issue with so many trainers.

  1. That’s all well and good until you have scenarios where you’re protecting people who can not run or fight.

  2. That presupposes your engaged with someone professionally trained and you should not have been armed or in that area if that is the case. So much training is predicated on our opponents being at least half trained guys with little to no ego. This is a fallacy. It’s possible to end up against this kind of opponent but not likely.

Ridiculous! Self Defense/Hand to Hand training has exactly nothing to do with your opponents training or abilities. Self Defense training, or at least the stuff we practice and teach is based on maximum damage to the closest target as soon as possible. Size, Strength, Ability can have nothing to do with it, my 65 year old wife against a 25 year old male thug hell bent on destruction is what we train for.

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My young son has been taking martial arts but at his age I don’t expect him to be able to make a rational decision and take the best actions during an attack. My wife has very limited self defense skills and mindset despite my best efforts to nudge her along the self defense path. So I do most of my training under the assumption that I will be protecting my family during an attack and that they may not be making the best choices while I am doing so.

In my mind and with what I have experienced from my training, having to defend others makes keeping control of the direction my muzzle is pointed in even more important. I need to make sure I have control of my weapon to keep it on target, pointed away from my family and out of the hands of an attacker. I can’t guarantee control if I’m sticking the muzzle into an attackers body.

My martial arts coach actually spends a fair amount of time forcing me to use different techniques and hands so I have the option to direct the attack away from my family depending on which side of me they are on. He also presents me with a number of challenges ranging from precise trained attacks to out of control drugged out flailing and everything in between. You never know what level of skill and will an attacker may have so I try to be prepared for as many possibilities as I can.

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That is the definition of “Training a Fighter”, Self Defense is an entirely different game.

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