Unwanted Photography

I was at a Sporting Clay course for a bachelor party last weekend, and some dingus was flying a drone around, seemingly taking video of the action. I didn’t see or find the individual, but I was a bit irritated. I don’t post anything on social media that has to do with guns, and don’t want some stranger to post my photo with a shotgun anywhere. I don’t know how the facility would allow such a thing, and when I asked, no one seemed to know about it. Aside from the overwhelming urge I had to simply treat the thing like any other flying object on the course and blast it out of the sky, what would you do in this situation?

I know that the majority of people at these facilities are responsible, but it is a clear violation of privacy, and it would be uncomfortable to confront anyone (even politely) for breaking rules at a gun range. I’d just like to know the community’s thoughts on the matter.

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There really isn’t much you can do about it. In today’s society cameras are everywhere. And with the advent of social media video sharing you get people who try to instigate or agitate others so thst they can get their 5 minutes of fame and/or a law suit.

All you really can do is your level best to ignore it. If you happen to catch your image online somewhere from that instance then you could try to sue for using your image without permission.

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If it was within the area of the targets and where rounds are being fired…it’s just another target especially if there are signs or anything posted about this not being allowed. I doubt that is the case though as most ranges I don’t think have thought about this topic yet. You also have to consider where the round is going to land (what is behind the target) and whether or not you would be firing in a safe direction.

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That makes sense. You would assume that someone who is spending the day at a gun range has more sense than that. Also, you’re flying an object around at a place where the sole purpose is to shoot flying objects… Next time someone may accidentally mistake it for their “report pair”.

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@Peter33 I agree with the action you have taken but I do not agree with you writing about admitting the resolution to your situation. I think you should edit your posting and eliminate the part where there is an admission of responsibility. Don’t admit things about gun by written words or speech. Think anything you want but once it’s committed to writing or talking you own it.

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It isn’t a violation of your privacy to be recorded in a public place. There are numerous laws about how you can be recorded and how the recording can be used. If someone uses your likeness to make $$ that’s a no-no.

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It might have been someone associated with the range flying the drone to take pictures for “promotional purposes”. Did you have to sign a waiver to participate? That might have been in the fine print…
Good, responsible target identity for not “mistaking” the drone for a flying clay… :smirk:

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There was no waiver, and the management was unaware of the situation.

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There is no presumption of privacy while in public and shooting the drone will likely land you in trouble.

It’s truly a sad statement of our society that we gun owners feel the need to hide lawful activities for fear of repercussion. Gun owners are not second class citizens.

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Isn’t a gun club considered private property? I was under the impression that it was legal to record people in a public setting, but on the private property of a gun club, where the land and the facility are privately owned, it was not legal, and one would have a reasonable assumption of privacy.

Even if it would technically be considered legal, someone should find this person (or others who do the same) and let them know that it is unsafe and unwise to record gun owners using their weapons. It puts them and their families in danger with all of the new “Red Flag Laws” and the general hysteria surrounding gun owners. Those of us who use our guns responsibly shouldn’t have to worry about one of our own taking videos or posting us with weapons for everyone to see.

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Not all gun clubs are private. The specifics are going to vary by location. My rule of thumb is if I’m not at home, I assume I’m going to be video recorded.

This person may not be doing anything malicious. Perhaps they’re just trying out their new drone and live next door to the range. (I’d give them a break if they live next door to the range - they put up with a lot of noise :wink: )

If this person was being malicious, you may be opening up a whole lot of unwanted issues for yourself talking to them. I’d advise the gun club and let them handle it.

Ultimately it is not illegal to be annoyed. Address any range issues to the range staff; do not take matters into your own hands. That is a good way to at the bare minimum get kicked off the range and potentially banned from coming back. When guns are involved you should always take the path of least resistance; 1) don’t be “that guy” 2) know legal vs personal preference vs range rules

If you are bothered by it that much, find a closed range, or a new range and ask those questions before deciding to spend your money and rounds.

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I believe, and someone here might want to research, that drones fall under FAA guidelines now? I’m at work so i’m pretty tied up at the moment but i remember something in the news, very recently, concerning drones and shooting them out of the skies. Person or persons could be prosecuted for under FAA guidelines.

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I belong to both public and private clubs - if its a public range, you’re fair game. If its a private range… now they should have permission to fly and photograph, and if they don’t the property owner can ask them to stop.

here’s a general guideline on when you can and can’t photograph people:

If they are intending to use the photos in a promotional way (say, to promote the range) then there are additional rules around “use of likeness” - here’s some more information:
https://www.rocketlawyer.com/article/when-you-need-a-photo-release.rl

and… all of the above is not official legal advice.

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Yes, drones fall under the FAA and you can be prosecuted FEDERALLY for blowing one out of the sky.

Cheers,

Craig6

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I do not know all the rules and regulations, if you are going to own and fly a drone you should read the restrictions and follow the laws.

Not all drones fall under the FAA. They have to have certain capabilities before they have to be registered with the FAA. If I am not mistaken it has to do with the range at which the drone can be operated from the operator.

A rule of thumb (not law) if you have to have line of sight to fly it “normally” would not need to be registered.

Operation of a drone near an airport, regulated by the FAA or not is a big NO NO and can land you in jail.

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