September Is National Preparedness Month 2023

@MICHAEL_LEE1 I thought this might interest you.
Wilderness Cord | Rope and Cord

2 Likes

Thanks for posting the link! Reminded me that I have been chipping away at my emergency paracord bundle for odd projects and I need to restock it.

1 Like

It sounds like you are thinking beyond putting together a bug out bag or stockpiling firearms/ammo, which is where many preppers fixate.

Consider … My system of 32 ground-mounted panels has now been running since 2016, and produces more than enough energy for my house and wheels the excess power back on to the grid (for which the local utility pays me). My monthly electric bill in 2016 averaged about $200, now, it’s $9 (the minimum connection charge). It came with a $9,000 tax credit, which is my money that I did not have to send to DC to be squandered in social programs and military adventurism. Where I live, I’m restricted to a system that produces 125% of my monthly average usage, otherwise I’d have built something bigger. The more difficult aspects of the construction involved digging the holes for the posts through granite and running several hundred feet of very heavy wire underground to the house. All doable, 'tho.

2 Likes

This looks like a great setup. I am envious.

I have a friend who has been experimenting with a portable solar setup and a battery bank of some kind. He has it connected to run the blower on his furnace. I don’t remember how long his batteries run his furnace fan. But it’s fascinating. I am an electrical ignoramus so I get lost really easy.

I had little emergency kits for the kids. I am in the early stages of rebuilding them since they are older. I don’t really like the term bug out bag because it conjures up images of running for the hills and living off the land when things go south. I don’t think that’s a viable strategy-at least not in my case. Guns and ammo are great, but, as you’ve stated, fixating there is a mistake.

I think “prepping” is a lifestyle of self-reliance and getting one’s head out of the sand when it comes to the bad things that can happen in life. I also think there’s a spectrum in terms of what folks are prepping for. I’m not ready for the zombie apocalypse, but I hope I can cope with at least some of what might be coming.

3 Likes

Just FYI I switched my BOB (Bug Out Bag) to a GHB (Get Home Bag). :laughing:
Slightly less survival items in a lighter bag. :slightly_smiling_face:
Call it whatever you want as long as you have one.

2 Likes

Invest what you can when you can. There’s no immediate urgency, but I fear there will come a time when prepping pays off.

It’s probably best to think in terms of what does your family need to survive. My priorities have been: (1) leave areas that will be dangerous (i.e., cities); (2) water (well, cisterns, roof-top collection, pumps); (3) power (toilets stop working if there is no water pressure); (4) food (greenhouse to lengthen growing season and keep critters out, can’t talk my wife into chickens or goats, 'tho); and, (5) heat (passive solar design of house, wood, radiant floor heat (requires power, 'tho)). Then, a lot of the work is self-education. For example, I did a lot of research into water cleaning/purification filters in the design of my water system.

Proponents of bug out bags and ammo often miss the need to have somewhere to go that can sustain them for a long period of time. Living off the land for an extended period is a fantasy and certainly not something one would subject their family to. My wife isn’t gonna live in a tent and spend the day chewing deer hides to soften them like Indians of yesteryear.

4 Likes

This may interest you and others. :slightly_smiling_face:
I buy a lot of Atwood Rope products from Fleet Farm, Made in USA. :+1:


Amazon.com: Atwood Rope MFG Ready Rope™ 550 Paracord 100 Feet 7-String Core Nylon Parachute Cord Outside Survival Gear Made in USA | Lanyards, Bracelets, Handle Wraps, Keychain (Coyote) : Sports & Outdoors

3 Likes

Black Friday Deals on Amazon.

Amazon.com : prepping supplies survival

1 Like

Agree. Except, I think most people who have a GHB or BOB mostly have it for local, temporary, regional, etc, not, like, the whoel country/world has turned to mad max. Think ice storm, hurricane, earthquake, city riots, etc. The point of the bags mostly is to get from point A to point B and generally there is going to be a viable point B, be it family or friend’s house in another location or merely a hotel room in an area that remains viable.

But, yeah, if things get movie/stephen king book level of bad nationwide…living off the land is pretty much not happening for anyone CONUS for any period of time (let alone east of the mighty miss)

4 Likes

Agree with your thinking completely. Bags I’ve packed for self and family are for just that reason.

A worst case scenario where I live would be the melt down of the local nuclear power plant. That would be an “I’m-never-coming-home” scenario for us. We would temporarily relocate to family out of state and try to rebuild our lives in an area of the country where the grid is still up.

I do have an evacuation checklist for the family if we would ever have to leave with 30 minutes notice or less.

We did “bug out” years ago when a hurricane came through. But that was more of a situation where we knew schools would close so we could take the chance to visit out of state family and get out of the area just in case.

I carry a lot of stuff in my work bag. My vehicle also has additional items. I think I could get home from work in what I have with me. Of course, my situation is very unique. I work with a lot of people I consider close friends and several of them live in our neighborhood. So we would all walk home together in that scenario. No. I haven’t talked to them about this stuff. And it is a relatively rural area so we wouldn’t be walking out of a major city. Seems like an incredibly unlikely scenario anyway.

4 Likes

I agree. Even the few people out there with the skills to do it would have an impossible time competing for wild food resources with all the “survivalists” who invested all their money into guns and gear instead of beans and rice.

4 Likes

Read W.W.Z. (not the movie). :thinking:

1 Like

My wife isn’t in to talking about preparedness or self defense issues but she does like zombie movies, books and games. So I can talk about those topics with her as long I keep it all in relation to an actual zombie apocalypse:)

2 Likes

A good deal on 12 mil. tarp I bought 6. :+1: Got the first ones today, nice thickness.
If you don’t like blue you can spray paint them camo. :slightly_smiling_face:

Amazon.com: 12’x16’ Heavy Duty Tarp – Waterproof, 12mil Thick Tarp Cover - UV Resistant, Rip & Tear Proof with Metal Grommets – Multipurpose Use for Camping, Tent, Boat, RV, Car : Tools & Home Improvement

  • 12’x16’

$26.97

  • 8’x10’

$13.47

  • 10’x12’

$17.97

  • 12’x20’

$26.97

  • 16’x20’

$37.77

  • 20’x30’

$58.47

Color Blue
Brand Teal Elite
Material Plastic
Item Thickness 12 Mils
Water Resistance Level Waterproof
Number of Items 1
Product Dimensions 192"L x 144"W
Size 12’x16’
Center To Center Spacing 18 Inches
Ultraviolet Light Protection True
3 Likes

Don’t be this Dog. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

5 Likes

Just in time for the Snow. A vid with some good ideas and a pep talk at the end. :+1:

I have stopped using Duracell battery’s for the same reason about a year ago and switched to Energizer and have not had any blow up. :scream:

Comments.

I have the same experience with Duracell. I use Energizer alkaline batteries for most applications, but Energizer lithium for seldom-used but vitally important stuff like electronics in the bugout bag or Eotechs. I have a lot of Eneloop NiMH batteries to use when things get sketchy. I plan to lend them to neighbors and exchange depleted batteries for charged ones as needed.

1

Reply

@07blackdog

@07blackdog

10 hours ago

Great advice. I had a Streamlight flashlight ruined by some Energizer alkaline batteries. To their credit, they asked me for the serial numbers on the batteries and the model of the flashlight and promptly mailed me a check for a replacement flashlight.

Reply

@stevebishop3796

@stevebishop3796

6 hours ago

Tough lesson for me as well! I switched to Energizer Lithium. Rated for 25 years. Rechargeables are ok but still not to same level.

1

Reply

1 Like

My experience is very similar. I have had noticeably more issues with alkaline Duracell than with alkaline Energizer but have had some Energizers go bad as well. If I have an item that is not going to be used for a long time I try to remember to pull the batteries out of it.

I have never had a set of Energizer lithium batteries go bad. If there is something I need to leave sitting for a long time but need the batteries left in so it is ready to go those are what I put in it.

I’ve had very good luck with Eneloop batteries. But after a decade in storage some of them had issues recharging and or holding a charge when I finally tried to use them. But I had others that I use in my GPS that are still working pretty well despite a decade or so of irregular use.

2 Likes

eneloop - Panasonic

1 Like

We had some pasta set back and rotating through it we found out some moths or beetles had laid eggs in it. Had to give to the chickens.

3 Likes