School shooting in Michigan

I have to go through metal detectors every time I go to the arena at MSU for basketball games and graduations.

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Ronald, I have been advocating this very idea to our local school district for about 5 years. I live in Michigan about 25 miles from Oxford where this tragedy took place. I first attended a school board meeting and reminded them that once the airports began screening all passengers there had been no more hijackings. I get blank stares from these people and the bum’s rush out of the door. One member told me it would be too expensive and inconvenient to put such a system in all of our schools. Apparently they are willing to put up with the inconvenience of attending funerals of slain students.

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If people want to act like children, treat them like children. Close everything until they grow up. :slight_smile:

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Personally I don’t understand how two parents could buy a 9mm for a 15-year-old and apparently treat the firearm pretty much as a toy. The father said they family enjoys shooting sports. But they seemed to lack basic safety procedures in their home. I gave my 15-year-old a .22 rifle as a gift BUT in remains locked in MY safe except when we are going to the range or the field. Even then I carry the ammo and magazines. (It’s a Savage with a detachable 10-round mag.) She’s now 21 and an excellent shot. Even more important, she knows and practices gun safety. Even though she’s got her own place now, she leaves the .22 locked in my safe until she can afford to buy her own safe.

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I think there is a disconnect between what the Prosecutor said were the reasons (including those stated in front of the judge) compared to all the information which the Prosecutor may have evidence.

The reasons as stated were insufficient (IMO) to press any sort of charges. However, there are a lot of rumblings that the kid was “troubled” and the parents knew he was troubled. Both parents upon hearing of a school shooting immediately jumped to the conclusion it was their kid. And then they ran from the cops. In light of that, the question of “should they have been more careful” depends (as always) on who knew what and when.

There is a lot of culpability to go around here. The kid (obviously), the parents, the school administrators, the policy makers (“restorative” practices). I heard early on that several kids stayed home that day because they thought something was going to happen. I haven’t seen any follow up on that, so it may have been just a rumor, but something worth looking into as well if we are going to be assigning blame to anyone who “could” have done something.

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My parents had a different way if I was disciplined “for cause”. They sent a gift certificate to the teacher for a meal at a nice restaurant with a note (to be signed by the teacher and returned) saying “thank you for setting my kid straight”. On the other hand, if my folks determined that I didn’t do anything wrong, they backed me up. This attitude really flattened the learning curve between right and wrong.

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I agree, it is better to be a part of the conversation and be able to possibly direct where the conversation goes rather than be on the outside and the results are forced upon you. I think the NRA is foolish for not wanting to be a part of the conversation. The day will come when they won’t be able to stall or subvert the agenda. Clearly we have a problem with school shootings and it is time to try and find a way to solve it

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A good start might be for parents to teach their children right from wrong. Give them guidelines as to what constitutes good behavior, giving praise for the demonstration of such behavior and commensurate punishment for bad behavior. Today, many parents seem to believe they can raise their kids by remote control, with excessive exposure to TV, video games, social media, etc. They abdicate their parental responsibilities to teachers and others that may not share their values as parents, thus allowing their children to be exposed to negative influences. Teach them respect and compassion for others. Demonstrate these qualities in front of them, that they may recognize them when they see them. Start them young so they can make these qualities a lifestyle. “As the twig is bent, so the tree will grow.”

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@Richard56 - The children today have leverage over their parents with the threat of calling the police and charging them with abuse. Our federal government gave them this threat to use years ago.
By the time it gets straighten out the parents life is ruined even if found innocent.
I was spanked across the ass with a belt and even worse other times.
I learned right from wrong and I’m sure many others of my time also learned.

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My parents never used weapons to administer punishment. I did, however, receive several applications of the open hand to my posterior for the more grievous infractions of their standards of good behavior. The only thing that happened was a slight amount of pain and a significant amount of damage to my pride, after which, the learning curve regarding my behavior was significantly flattened out. Yes. The government did exactly as you say. Today, we are reaping the results of the government approved child rearing. I submit that, for a good, high profile example of government approved child rearing, we need look no further than Hunter Biden.

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i look at things , how they have changed. Like you, most of us had shoot guns in our trucks, on a rack for all to see. And there some that had 22’s. And we never gave a thought about shooing anyone. And we had respect for teachers as well as others. My wife & I used to work with street teens. And must of them was good teens deep on the inside.But they got into trouble because the parents were like friends, NOT PARENTS… And not saying that all parents are bad so don’t get upset. The teens would tell us, wish my parents would quite being my friend, and be a real parent. To tell me NO, don’t act that way, and be in my 8:00 PM , OR PAY FOR YOUR CRIME. And have them tell me, they better not ever have to come looking for me. Thats why I do believe things are changing. To many voices talking to our kids, telling them its ok to punch, hit & shoot others down because they are in the way.

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I agree, this a true example of being a bad parents. Glad to see this action taken on the parents.

We as a gun owner have a large duty to make sure that no one can get their hands on our weapons. Its all on us, no one else. And we all have to know at all times where our weapons are. And better know who has them. Are guns my save our life, but in the wrong hands we can lose our life as well. So its up to all of us to be aware & know where it is 24-7.

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I went to school looooong ago. Things were different. When I was in school my mother was home most of the time after I got home. Today very often both parents work, sometimes more than one job. I was driven to school and walked home, a bit over a mile, unless it was raining. I started walking home very young. Today my parents would probably get an LEO visit about child endangerment. I carried a pocket knife at school from at least 4th grade. No one cared. In our part of town money was tight in all homes, yet we had little violence of any kind.
In high school I heard of heroin use but never saw anything. Most high school age youth in our part of town had some kind of part time job.
There were lots of “sand lot” baseball and football games, no adults around. The ages of participants varied a lot and the younger ones got chosen last. We learned to work out disagreements ourselves. There was a lot of learning value in those games, too bad there is so little of that today.
OK, OK - to sum up, MANY things are different today. There is no “silver bullet” answer.
Oh yes, I got my first .22 rifle at age 12. No, I never even remotely considered shooting anyone.

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When I was in high school, we had our trucks with gun racks & our riffles & shot guns in the rack, and our trucks were unlocked. will not see that now days. And just two weeks ago someone was shooing at a school bus going down the freeway. Really getting bad out there. What is going wrong now days in our towns?

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