Rookie gun owner

You may notice, that at times, your threads will get high jacked, but not to worry, they mean well.

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I prefer to read. Sorry for the video, but here’s my one recommendation. There’s a lot of worthwhile information in this video beyond the subject in the title.

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Welcome to the community @Kathy25

There are lots of experienced people here and they have already provided some very good advice. One thing I haven’t noticed anyone mention yet is dry fire practice. Not only is it cheap and safe (if you triple check to make sure the pistols are unloaded and there is no loaded magazines or ammo in the same room) but it is also probably the most effective training you can do. Here is an introduction to the topic from a well regarded trainer, Chris Sajnog:

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hey, Brother… there was one person… :stuck_out_tongue:

:wink:

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I started watching Scott Jedlinski, get tips on grip, he’s on the Modern Samurai Project

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Scott is another MUST-TO-WATCH channel for every RED DOT user ! Best classes and advices ever !

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Sorry. I must have tuned out the rest of your post after you started dissing on the Glocks😉

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:pleading_face:

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I appreciate the info. I will definitely check it out. Thanks

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@Kathy25 Welcome to the community. There’s lots to learn, and lots of great people in this community so stay in touch, and great to have you onboard.

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Kathy25 the best advice I can give you is NEVER get complacent about the 4 basic safety rules. Learn at your own pace and practice as often as you can.

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Hello and welcome @Donnie20

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Thank you. Not really new I just almost never post. :wink:

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I will chime in and say I feel I have greatly benefited from dry-fire training in the privacy of my own home. Rehearsing trigger pulls such that they do not change the Point Of Aim (POI) to drawing from a concealed holster are just a couple of skills you can hone without leaving home or spending money on ammo.

The biggest risk/danger is getting lax at confirming the dry-fire gun is absolutely empty. This guy not only broke the 4 rules of safe gun handling, but also failed to confirm his gun was empty:

I personally keep guns in my safe loaded with snap caps. Even though I am the only person that ever goes into my safe, I drop the magazine and lock the slide back to inspect for an empty chamber every dry-fire training session. The reason is every one of those guns have magazines and ammo available, and I have to be sure I never have a brain fart and returned one of them to the safe after loading and carrying them.

Edit: Here’s the link to the article just in case the linked thread gets broken: Dry fire turns deadly after basic gun safety rules ignored – Bearing Arms

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Well even if you hardly ever post, welcome to the community @Donnie20

Hopefully you’ll be able to post often.

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Yup. Keep your firearms clean, even if they are a Glock. (Very reliable)

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Friend told me he is going to try 5000 rounds before cleaning his, says he read it in the manual. We’ll see.

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I missed that in my manual, but keep us posted.

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:grin:
And that the problem with Glock’s reliability.
They can pass 5000 rds no cleaning challenge… but won’t eject magazine when quick reload is needed. :joy:

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That’s a pricey experiment :slight_smile: ~$500+ for a Glock 17 or 19, plus ~$1,250+ for ammo (25 cpm x 5,000) = ~$1,750+, Thank goodness there are folks out there with the disposable income to try it out :+1:

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