Rookie gun owner

I appreciate the info. I will definitely check it out. Thanks

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@Kathy25 Welcome to the community. There’s lots to learn, and lots of great people in this community so stay in touch, and great to have you onboard.

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Kathy25 the best advice I can give you is NEVER get complacent about the 4 basic safety rules. Learn at your own pace and practice as often as you can.

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Hello and welcome @Donnie20

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Thank you. Not really new I just almost never post. :wink:

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I will chime in and say I feel I have greatly benefited from dry-fire training in the privacy of my own home. Rehearsing trigger pulls such that they do not change the Point Of Aim (POI) to drawing from a concealed holster are just a couple of skills you can hone without leaving home or spending money on ammo.

The biggest risk/danger is getting lax at confirming the dry-fire gun is absolutely empty. This guy not only broke the 4 rules of safe gun handling, but also failed to confirm his gun was empty:

I personally keep guns in my safe loaded with snap caps. Even though I am the only person that ever goes into my safe, I drop the magazine and lock the slide back to inspect for an empty chamber every dry-fire training session. The reason is every one of those guns have magazines and ammo available, and I have to be sure I never have a brain fart and returned one of them to the safe after loading and carrying them.

Edit: Here’s the link to the article just in case the linked thread gets broken: Dry fire turns deadly after basic gun safety rules ignored – Bearing Arms

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Well even if you hardly ever post, welcome to the community @Donnie20

Hopefully you’ll be able to post often.

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Yup. Keep your firearms clean, even if they are a Glock. (Very reliable)

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Friend told me he is going to try 5000 rounds before cleaning his, says he read it in the manual. We’ll see.

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I missed that in my manual, but keep us posted.

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:grin:
And that the problem with Glock’s reliability.
They can pass 5000 rds no cleaning challenge… but won’t eject magazine when quick reload is needed. :joy:

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That’s a pricey experiment :slight_smile: ~$500+ for a Glock 17 or 19, plus ~$1,250+ for ammo (25 cpm x 5,000) = ~$1,750+, Thank goodness there are folks out there with the disposable income to try it out :+1:

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That makes me curious to know how many folks have required a mag reload under a self defense situation. Makes me wonder how the “self defense” defense would hold up in court. Makes me wonder if these people who have required a mag reload in a self defense situation have sufficiently trained. Things that make you go hmmm. :thinking:

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I’ll have to look up one of those police encounters where the deceased suspect was shot 47 times. :wink:

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I read somewhere that is a feature of the design.

Ever heard of “tap, rack, bang” for an immediate action drill?

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That is the question you never get answer for.

People are using statistics to train for self defense. That is not me.
If statistically self defense occurs with distance 3 - 5 yards, it doesn’t mean I don’t practice self defense scenarios with distances more than 10 yards.
The same is with ammo and reloads. Statistics say 3 bullets. OK. But what happens if i need 8 or 11 or 16 to defend myself? What is my main magazine fails? I don’t want to be another number in FBI statistics listed as a victim. :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

Perhaps nobody needs reloads for self defense… but what if in 1 case in a million somebody does need it and has no idea what to do? :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

I do always train for every possible situation. I want myself and my friends, students to be prepared for each option, to have at least two options to act and be safe.

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Does “tap, rack, bang” fixes bad magazine or top it off if more ammo needed? :wink:

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Better to clean handgun with CLP mixed with sand and shoot 1 mag. It gives the same idea.
I can bet on it - Glock will still shoot. :+1:

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No, but it would fix a full good magazine partially dropped down after the magazine release was accidentally pressed. That’s why I called it a feature not a flaw.

What seems more likely to occur during a self defense situation?
Human error pressing the magazine release?
Using all the ammunition in your mag and needing an additional magazine? Or the quality magazine and ammunition you tested in it suddenly breaking at the worst possible time?

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I don’t calculate what seems more likely to occur during a self defense situation.
I’m always trying to keep in mind all the possibilities.
If I’m missing mag release in my handgun, I’m not using it.
If my shooting performance is bad with the handgun, I’m not using it.
If my handgun malfunction three times with the same part… I’m not using it.
Human error can be fixed or corrected, but I always check why this error occurs.

I do not calculate. I need the best tool, best performance and zero* malfunction.
.* [ American zero - meaning 0% - 5% is still zero] :slightly_smiling_face:

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