Press Checks: Do you or don't you?

My position on this evolved a bit from this thread due to advice from @Zee and @Dawn. I installed a safe next to bed so I eliminated the morning press check.

Now I only press check at range, and if I have not had positive physical control. Such as going to Dr. Office.

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I think, as with so many topics in the gun community, that it’s very situational for me. There are times when I do and times where I know I don’t need to. The main thing for me is working to know how to distinguish between those times and make sure I do everything efficiently and safely.

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I’ve only been shooting for about three years now. I formed a habit of checking the chamber and mag slot every time I take the gun out of, or put it back in the holster or range bag. I primarily use revolvers, so I open and spin the cylinder, making sure all the chambers are empty. But, I believe that’s called “clearing” a weapon, not press-checking, as shown in the video. When I bring the semi-auto to the range, I bring about ten loaded magazines along with it. (I got a good price on some factory mags so I’m flush with them.) I drop the spent mag and insert the new one. Then I try to figure out where I was in the set of five targets and which one I should aim at next. By that time I’m not sure if I actually chambered a round, so I do a press-check to make sure.

When I press-check, I do more than look into the chamber. If the chamber is empty, I take a look at the angle of the top 22LR round in the mag. If it appears to be angled too far up, I press it down to avoid a failure-to-feed event, about the only problem I’ve ever had with my Ruger SR22.

This all reminds me of a story I read about a cafeteria setting, midway through a classroom session at a police station. One cop hands his new revolver to another for a look. He opens the cylinder and spin-checks it, closes the cylinder and accidentally puts a round into the ceiling. He saw it was loaded but pulled the trigger anyway! These guys were experienced shooters and none of them was irresponsible. It just shows how easy it is to believe a gun is empty even when you know it isn’t - just the opposite of the rule.

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A good habit to have, when in doubt, press check it out.

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True!
I’ve been so worried before bed that I would check once, read a book, then have to check again even though I know it is.

I’ve been doing good so far not press checking.

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6 posts were split to a new topic: Glock makes a non traditional .45

The reason I said “no” is my carry weapon has a “loaded chamber indicator” that I can feel with my finger, and also see visually. I still verify before taking my hand off the weapon, but I don’t crack open the slide and take a peek. :wink:

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FYI… Glock LCI
Chambered round…


Empty chamber…

***Always treat a firearm as chambered. This is assuming Centerfire ammo. Not sure about Rimfire ammo.

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Yeah, I would not go by the LCI!

It would scare me half to death!

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This is why I love the M&P chamber hole.

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I press check one time…in the morning before I go out the door. That is all…:slightly_smiling_face:

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Actually, it’s “Always treat a gun as if it is loaded.” That applies to centerfire, rimfire, BB guns and even the colored rubber guns they passed out to us during class! The instructor was making a point, but getting into the mindset that there are exceptions to such rules can be dangerous.

Alex

Handle a gun like your life depends on it - it does.

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@AlexV My two sentences are mutually exclusive.

First, I was questioning if the functionality of the LCI on all Glocks was identical with both types of ammo. I am not an expert and wanted to know. As I wrote, it was an assumption.

Secondly, describing a gun with a round chambered infers the gun being loaded.

Of course never point a gun at anyone. Not sure why your replied required an explanation mark. I take exception to your inference that my post was “dangerous”.

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Sorry. No offense intended.

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@AlexV We are good. I was up late and tired. Sorry for being so direct. I look forward to posting together in the future with you. Enjoy your day sir. :+1:

As a learning experience for me… does anyone here know the history of Glock regarding Centerfire versus Rimfire ammo?

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We have to be careful about this, friends. [I always say this and it’s in contradiction to what we have been taught but TEXT DOES NOT HAVE TONE <----- Example, I was not yelling but rather highlighting for you to see that particular text—just text above all my other words such as these.

I just love this community @TexasEskimo & @AlexV and I’m certain sometimes we take things the wrong way [MYSELF INCLUDED] and perhaps sometimes going privately to them [In peace] and ask, “Hey, that was offensive, what about the punction, ext. ext.”

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This is how I do it as well. My gun also has a peep hole to look inside and see if need be.

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Please, Please forget the peep hole!
When clear, and know your apart of our Choir friend, but always pull magazine out, pull slide releasing ammo[I’ve had times where two[not in glock but still] two ended up in chamber and as you know lock slide and stick finger

YES stick finger in there! [USCCA taught me this and did save my life]

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I completely understand and that is good advice, but I do all that when I unload my gun or before I load my gun, as a precaution. I was referring to when I load, I don’t press check. I put a mag in, chamber, holster and then top off the mag with a round or I have a mag empty of all but one round, put the plus one in, remove the mag and then put the full one in and holster. I have tried putting the full mag in while it is holstered and I have some issues there.

also, my SD9VE won’t close if it is trying to double feed. I have had that happen with snap caps. Pain in the butt to remove the stuck “round”.

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I agree, Dawn. Reading all these posts, I keep wondering why it is so hard to remember if your gun is loaded in chamber or not. This is of course when you are defensive carrying each day. Once you load your gun with one in chamber, then top off mag, it stays that way until you change it. Ok, you know you loaded it, why question it as long as you have control of it. Unloading the gun for whatever reason is another situation. Yes, anytime you unload you gun, you are going to remove the mag, rack the slide to remove the bullet, then lock open the slide and stick your finger in the barrel to verify no bullet. While the gun is unloaded, i will press check anytime i am going to pull the trigger, just to make sure, and it is treated as if it may be loaded always. But while in loaded defensive mode, it is treated as loaded, always, I do not need to press check, because it does not change. I know because I loaded it.

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